Alexanderplatz, Berlin

4 out of 5 stars 96 Reviews

Alexanderplatz, Berlin-Mitte

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Alexanderplatz
    by JuliaMac
  • Alexanderplatz
    by JuliaMac
  • Alexanderplatz
    by JuliaMac
  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Alexanderplatz

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Alexanderplatz is a vast square and was the former East Berlin's main commercial hub. It is called 'Alex' by the locals and was one of the most vibrant parts of Berlin prior to the second World War.

    At the centre of Alexanderplatz stands the Weltzeituhr (world time clock) and the - impossible to miss - TV Tower.

    You can also see the Marienkirche, Berlins second oldest church, built in 1270 though extensively remodelled in the 15th century. The small steel cross on the churches spire can sometimes be seen reflected in the TV Tower, which used to cause upset for the East German government.

    Nearby is the Neptunbrunnen - Neptune Fountain - built in 1891-95. The fountain depicts the sea god Neptune, surrounded by four female figures which symbolise 4 German rivers.

    By now you will have noticed the Rotes Rathaus, Berlins town hall, which was built between 1861-69. It is home to the Governing Mayor and Senate. It is nicknamed 'Red Town Hall' due to the colour of the bricks used in its construction, nothing to do with its socialist past.

    If the weather is fine, why not perch on the edge of the fountain and watch the world go by for a while.

    Alexanderplatz inside Marienkirche Marienkirche spire and the TV Tower Rotes Rathaus Neptunbrunnen
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    The heart of East Berlin

    by toonsarah Written Jun 17, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Like Potsdamer Platz, Alexanderplatz was a hub of the city’s nightlife when Berlin was in its heyday in the 1920s, and like it was badly damaged by Allied bombing raids during the Second World War. But unlike its counterpart to the west, Alexanderplatz lay entirely in one sector, the East, so was rebuilt and redeveloped after the war by the German Democratic Republic government. It became something of a showcase of Soviet-style city planning and was consequently one of the places we made sure to visit on our one day in East Berlin back in 1985.

    The centre of the square seems little changed today, although since reunification many of buildings around it have been modernised and new ones have been built, notably a large shopping mall, Alexa. We didn’t check that out, but did have a short stroll around the square itself to relive memories of that earlier visit.

    On both occasions it was a pretty lively place. Last time we were here that was mainly due to the large number of people passing through, and many others lingering here to meet friends by the Brunnen der Völkerfreundschaft ("Fountain of Friendship between Peoples"). This is the rather ugly but much loved centre-piece of the square; it is a protected monument and was renovated in 2002.

    This time round it was a Saturday morning, and we found the square preparing for some sort of fair/exhibition, apparently promoting holidays in the countryside. There were animal pens created with bales of hay, displays of tents and other camping equipment, lots of “fresh from the farm” food stalls ... all a little incongruous in such an urban setting. We left the locals to enjoy all of this and instead headed over to the other iconic monument, the Weltzeituhr (World Time Clock). This shows the names of a number of foreign cities in different time zones. It too has been restored since our last visit (in 1997) and now includes a number of cities that were originally left out for political reasons were added, namely Jerusalem, St. Petersburg and Cape Town. On top of the clock is a model of the solar system.

    Right next to Alexanderplatz, and indelibly associated with it, is the Fernsehturm or TV Tower. This is the second tallest structure in Europe and can be seen from all over the city. When the sun shines it is reflected from the windows near the top in the shape of a cross (see photo 4). In the days of the Cold War and East/West division this effect was nicknamed “the Pope’s revenge” – the Soviet regime might have done its best to stamp out Christianity (and all religions), but the Pope had a way of making sure the Christian symbol could still be seen everywhere in East Berlin.

    Weltzeituhr and Fernsehturm, Alexanderplatz Weltzeituhr and Fernsehturm, Alexanderplatz Fernsehturm reflected in Alexanderplatz building Fernsehturm: the Pope���s revenge
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    Centre of the East has become the Centre of it All

    by Kakapo2 Updated Oct 2, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This was the place where we met up with relatives from the East when we visited Berlin during the times of German separation, mostly at the Weltuhr (World Time Clock) – sorry, forgot to take a picture of that on our last visit LOL

    On and around the Square that everybody calls Alex you find an array of important buildings, as the Fernsehturm (TV Tower), Brunnen der Völkerfreundschaft (Peoples Friendship Fountain), Marienkirche (St. Mary’s Church), Neptunbrunnen (Neptune Fountain), Rotes Rathaus (Red Town Hall), today known and used as the Berliner Rathaus (Berlin Town Hall) and the historic Berolinahaus – today transformed into a huge department store (C&A).

    The Alex was the centre of East Berlin, and thanks to the dominant 368 metres high Fernsehturm we never forgot about our Ossi brothers LOL

    Alex is named after the Russian Tsar Alexander I who visited in 1805. Then it was a suburb and had conserved its rural character. Cattle fairs were held here, and the surrounding barracks used the area as a site for parades. Only when the S-Bahn was finished in 1882 and a central market hall built in 1886, the Alex started to become the most important traffic and shopping area for Berlin’s eastern suburbs. A big department store (1904 to 1911) was added, and also the U-Bahn got a stop there (in 1913). Due to traffic jams and chaos, a roundabout was built around the square in 1928.

    During World War II the area was terribly destroyed, so the square was redesigned, firstly by expanding its size, so it lost its enclosed character. You nearly got lost in the huuuuuuuuuuuge pedestrian area, surrounded by multi-lane roads for the through-traffic.

    Evening atmosphere at Alexanderplatz.
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Gerrem's Profile Photo

    Past & Future

    by Gerrem Written Aug 27, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At the beginning of the 19th century, the Alexanderplatz was one of the busiest squares in the city. Originally it was called the Ochsenmarkt or oxen market, but after a visit by Tzar Alexander I it was renamed to Alexanderplatz. The locals simply call this large square 'Alex'.
    Most of the buildings on the square were destroyed by bombing during the second world war. As the center of East-Berlin, the square was used as a showcase of socialist architecture. This resulted in some plain bulky buildings and a huge television tower.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • MD2nd's Profile Photo

    Build-A-Bear

    by MD2nd Updated Aug 27, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What a big surprise: Build-A-Bear Workshop in Germany's Berlin! I learned about this store way back in Kansas City, Missouri, when I visited there with wonderful friends. Build-A-Bear: One starts by choosing a bear from a huge selection of bears at the shop (choose me). Then one gives choosen bear a voice by recording some words, the mic gets inside the paw (hear me). Then one chooses a heart for bear, and make a wish while putting the heart into bear's chest (back in US my wish did come true, right the next day when I found myself in a piper, enjoying a flight over Missouri and Kansas to a place where I met a person that I haven't seen in years, and that still holds such a special place in my heart). Then the next step, bear with heart will get stuffed with wool by using air pressure (stuff me). Then bear gets a Birth Certificate (name me). Then bear gets dressed with clothes of one's choice (dress me). Eventually bear is not alone anymore (take me home). HAPPY END. Now, may I introduce my loved Missouri bear:
    Date of Birth: October 21, 2004
    Full Name: Dolly Madison Hugs
    Height: 14 Inches
    Weight: 9 Ounces
    Fur Color: White
    Eye Color: Brown
    Belongs to: Maria Daehn

    Build-A-Bear Build-A-Bear Build-A-Bear Build-A-Bear in Missouri Missouri-Dolly and me have your back here too
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Karin1S's Profile Photo

    A View Around Berlin

    by Karin1S Written Sep 6, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Berlin's highest edifice, the Fernsehturm; (TV-Tower), was opend in 1969 and is known to the vernacular as "Telespargel".
    In clear weather you can enjoy a spectacular view over 40 kilometres fro its revolving Panorama café.

    Opend: 9 -1 a.m (March-oct) and 9-0 a.m. (Nov - Feb)
    Price: 6,50 Euro

    TV-Tower
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Family Travel
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    Brunnen der Völkerfreundschaft (Friendship Fount.)

    by Kakapo2 Updated Oct 2, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Although the name of this fountain on Alexanderplatz is Friendship Fountain of Nations (or: Peoples) we had the impression is was a place for gay guys to find and reinforce their friendships LOL We nearly felt like outsiders, being straight LOL

    Well, this might have been a coincidence on this particular day. But it is clear that this fountain is a very popular meeting place. The wide rims are perfect for sitting down, chatting and watching people.

    Nothing special about this fountain from GDR times. The main materials are copper sheets, coloured tiles, enamelled plates and glass crystals, reflecting the sunlight in the water.

    The major feature are 17 water-crowned rhombae-shaped bowls on sturdy legs, placed in spiral order in a round two-storey basin. The water fountains spiral their way down from one bowl to the next until it reaches the big upper basin. The outside of this basin has a very colourful enamal design, matching the colours of the nearby World Time Clock, so mainly from yellow over orange to red, and featuring butterflies, flowers and trees. From this basin the water flows into the exterior basin through several openings.

    A colourful meeting place.
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • alancollins's Profile Photo

    Alexanderplatz

    by alancollins Updated Aug 25, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I visited Alexanderplatz a number of times during my visit to Berlin. It is one of those areas that is always seems busy and it is an important hub in the transport system. The whole area was flattened during WW2 and was redeveloped in a typical socialist style during the 1960’s. Though there were plans to redevelope the area again after reunitification those plans have been put on hold at this time though there has been some tinkering around the edges with a new shopping centre. For those in a hurry there are numerous fast food outlets waiting to have their wares sampled. For those in need of retail therapy there is the upmarket Galeria Kaufhof. Two Tall structures dominate the area these are the Fernsehturm and the Park Inn Hotel, but closer to earth are the world clock and friendship fountain.

    World clock with Galeria Kaufhof in the background Park Inn Hotel Friendship Fountain Fernsehturm Fernsehturm

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Der Alex

    by antistar Updated Jan 12, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    "The wide-open and empty space of Alexanderplatz is the focal point of East Berlin, and the subject of major remodeling by this part of the city's former Socialist masters. Der Alex was intended to be the showpiece of a utopian socialist republic, but in retrospect looks a little sorry for itself, and barely merits a mention in my 1100 page guide book to Germany. It was also the scene of the million strong demonstration that led to the tearing down of the wall in 1989, hence its iconic use in the opening titles of the wonderful film, "Goodbye, Lenin!" Personally I loved it, and found its sad reminders of former Stalinist glories quite endearing, but then again I'm a sucker for hard luck stories, and der Alex seemed like exactly that." - from my travelogue

    Der Alex is all hustle and bustle, and has plenty of great places to eat, drink and shop. If you are on the east side, then you'll want to stop off here at some point, or you'll be missing out on a good part of what Berlin is, and was, all about. It also serves as a great starting point for a walk to the Brandenburg gate, taking you along the wide Under den Linden boulevard, across the elegant river Spree, past the nasty old Palast der Republik, and into Pariser Platz. Personally this was one of my favourite parts of Berlin, although it only gets a passing mention of a couple of sentences in my 1100 page Rough Guide to Germany. Der Alex also includes an impressive sight of its own, the unmissable, in many senses of the word, Fernsehturm.

    Since I first visited in 2004 a brand new shopping centre has been added, blocking views from Alexanderplatz to the marvelously socialist House of Teachers.

    World Clock, Alexanderplatz, Berlin Der Alex, Berlin, 2004 Der Alex, Berlin, 2004 Alexanderplatz, Berlin

    Was this review helpful?

  • jenniferchin's Profile Photo

    Alex !

    by jenniferchin Updated Oct 8, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At the beginning of the 19th century, the Alexander-platz was one of the busiest squares in the city. Originally it was called the Ochsenmarkt or oxen market, but after a visit by Tzar Alexander I it was renamed to Alexanderplatz. The locals simply call this large square 'Alex'.

    Fernsehturm

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Alexander Platz

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Feb 4, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the center of former East Berlin - is Alexander Plaz.
    Berliners name its - Square Alex in honour of the Russian emperor Alexander the First on the occasion of his stay in Berlin. The next square is named Marx's and Engels. Very close there are Charles Libkneht and Clara Tsetkin's streets. It is surprising, that Germans have kept names of founders of communism in names of streets and the squares, being guided by which ideas experiment has been put in East Germany . The experiment, thanks to God, has failed. However, there are streets Vilgelmshtrasse and Fridrihstrasse perpendicular to these streets, named in memory of Prussian emperors.

    Alexander Plaz Alexander Plaz
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    A big Building Site for quite a While

    by Kakapo2 Updated Oct 2, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When we visited in August 2007 the square was a huge building site, with fences, cranes, diggers and ditches everywhere. You could already imagine that some day also this monumental square will get new life.

    Quite good examples of reviving Alexanderplatz are the huge renovated department stores Kaufhof and C&A, the latter now being in the former Berolinahaus.

    There is still a lot to do at Alexanderplatz. Clothes store C&A in the former Berolinahaus.
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    The former Architecture of Alexanderplatz

    by Kakapo2 Updated Oct 2, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A lot of buildings have been demolished around Alex after the reunification but you can still see the character of the 1960s architecture. Ugly concrete skyscrapers adorned by even interesting facades with colourful painted scenes of socialist life. A very propaganda-like look.

    But I must admit, I liked it on my revisit, as it reminded me of the time long gone by, and the days when we succeeded to smuggle pocket calculators and Led Zeppelin LP’s into the East, and queued in front of the bookshops on Alex to spend our East-Marks we were forced to exchange on entering GDR, and everything was so cheap that spending the money was really a problem if you did not want to have lunch three times within an hour ;-)

    Colourful propaganda facade of the East.
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • EasyMalc's Profile Photo

    'Alex'

    by EasyMalc Updated Jan 23, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Alexanderplatz, or Alex, as it’s known to Berliners is a windswept pedestrianised plaza doubling up as a meeting point and transport hub in what used to be East Berlin.
    It was the downtown centre for the locals when it was behind the Iron Curtain and it still is today and no visit to Berlin would be complete without visiting Alex.
    It’s more than likely that you’ll arrive by one of the many modes of transport that converge here. If you arrive by S Bahn head north out of the station away from the monumental TV Tower, cross the road and walk through to the plaza where the Park Inn towers over the square below.
    Named in honour of a visit to Berlin by the Russian Tsar Alexander I in 1805, it started life as a cattle and wool market in the Middle Ages and has been a focal point ever since.
    The square has seen many ups and downs - being seedy one minute, and upmarket the next. The 1920s and early thirties were probably its apogee when re-development brought some modern architecture of the day into the arena. Two of the buildings - the Alexanderhaus and the Berolinahaus - survived the 2nd World War and are still standing today.
    What we mainly see now though is largely a product of the GDR’s idea of a downtown centre for East Berlin that could rival anything that West Berlin could do, and the large department store known as Centrum (now Kaufhof) was one of the best stocked shops in Eastern Germany.
    The Hotel Stadt Berlin (now the Park Inn) was built in the late 1960s, as was the World Clock and Friendship among Nations Fountain. The Fountain is near the Park Inn and the clock is in the eastern part (far side) of the plaza.
    Being a focal point meant that it attracted a fair number of demonstrations over the years but none bigger than the anti-government rally just before the wall came down in Nov 1989. It’s been estimated that up to a million people joined the demonstration.
    Now that the wall has come down it has become popular with Berliners and visitors alike. It also means that it hasn’t escaped the attention of developers either and several of the buildings around the square have had a makeover. So far no major development has taken place to alter the GDR concept of the square but on the other side of the railway station construction work has already started next to the TV Tower.
    I’ve always regarded this area as an extension to Alexanderplatz and has its own appealing features and so I wouldn’t like to see it change too much either.
    During the communist years it could well have seemed quite a soulless place at times but I don’t think it’s necessary to rush headlong into transforming it into just another commercial square like so many others - and I’d like to think that Berliners see it the same way and keep Alex as a special part of their extraordinary history.

    Related to:
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Alexanderplatz - Worth Visiting

    by Mikebb Updated Jul 6, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A large square in the former East Berlin surrounded by high rise buildings. The morning we visited we caught the metro from Stadtmitte underground station for a quick ride to Alexanderplatz. The train arrived at the square and as we emerged from the underground we were greeted by a fairground atmosphere.

    A very busy platz, colourful activities that would please both adults and children. Market stalls, food vendors plus the cheap German sausage in a bun.

    Alexanderplatz Subway Entrance German Sausage Vendor  GrillWalker, Alexanderplatz Centre Fountain, Market Stalls & Office Buildings
    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Berlin

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

41 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Alexanderplatz
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
12 Reviews
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
Show Prices

View all Berlin hotels