Brandenburger Tor, Berlin

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Pariser Platz, Berlin-Mitte

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  • Maria250's Profile Photo

    Brandenburg Gate

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 17, 2011

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    Brandenburg Gate
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    The Brandenburg Gate, Berlin’s most famous landmark, is over 200 years old. Until 1989 it symbolized the division of Berlin and Germany. Today it is a national symbol of unity.
    The structure is the only remaining city gate in Berlin.

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    Take lots of photos of course! :)

    by jumpseater Written Jul 29, 2011

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    that's me. Brandenburg Gate, Berlin. June 2011

    it's a must to visit Branderburg gate and admire the architectural wonder. Take a photo and learn about its history! It's one of the most famous monumental structures in Berlin.
    Also, the Reichstag Building is less than 1 KM away so you can also visit Reichstag from there by just walking.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Platz des 18 März

    by toonsarah Written Jun 17, 2011

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    Platz vor dem Brandenburger Tor in 1985
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    The semi-circular area on the western side of the Brandenburg Gate used to be called, prosaically, "Platz vor dem Brandenburger Tor" (Place in front of the Brandenburg Gate), and for years was sealed off in the “Death Strip” (No Man’s Land) behind the outer Berlin Wall – this photo 2 was taken on our 1985 visit. But when the Wall fell it was once again accessible, and was the scene of a lot of the impromptu parties that took place at that time.

    In June 2000 it was renamed Platz des 18 März. The name commemorates both the events of the revolution of 1848 and the first free and democratic parliamentary elections in the former GDR on March 18, 1990. Today the line of the Wall is marked, as elsewhere in the city, by a double line of cobbles, but it is hard to make these out as the traffic passes constantly through – and even harder to photograph them!

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Walking through the gate

    by toonsarah Updated Jun 17, 2011

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    Brandenburg Gate from east side
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    On our last visit to Berlin, in 1985, the Brandenburg Gate was completely “off-limits”, stranded as it was in the middle of No Man’s Land between East and West – photo 4 was taken on this visit (and is worth opening to see how young I looked then!). It was one of my main aims on this trip to do what we had been unable to do then, and walk through the Brandenburg Gate. After all, isn’t that what a gate is for?

    So through the gate we went. It was wonderful to be able to appreciate the full grandeur of this structure, and to see the unlimited view westwards from its far side, through the greenery of the Tiergarten to the distant golden gleam of the Siegessäule (Victory Column). Unfortunately the similarly impressive view eastwards, along Unter den Linden, was blocked on this occasion by a large vehicle promoting Amnesty International – a worthy cause but a lousy place to park! Still, we did manage to get some great close-up photos, another pleasure denied to us in the past.

    The Brandenburg Gate was built in 1791, commissioned by Friedrich Wilhelm II as a symbol of peace. It is the only remaining gate of several that once ringed the city, and when built formed the grand entry to Unter den Linden, the famous boulevard of linden trees which in those days led directly to the city palace of the Prussian monarchs. It consists of twelve Doric columns, six on each side, which form the five passageways – citizens originally were allowed to use only the outermost two. On top of the gate is the Quadriga, a chariot drawn by four horses driven by Victoria, the Roman goddess of victory, as seen in my photos.

    Like much of Berlin the Gate was badly damaged in the Allied bombing raids of World War Two, but was patched up in a joint effort by the governments of the two Berlins. It remained accessible for a time, and the people of Berlin could pass through it when crossing between the two halves of the city as the East Germans had a border guard here, but when the Berlin Wall was built in August 1961 the Gate was stranded in No Man’s Land, just as it was when we first saw it 24 years after that.

    The Wall fell on 9 November 1989, and on 22 December 1989, the Brandenburg Gate crossing was reopened when Helmut Kohl, the West German chancellor, walked through to be greeted by Hans Modrow, the East German prime minister. After reunification it was fully restored, and in 2002 opened up in its current majestic state.

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Brandenburg Tor

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Brandenburg Tor (gate) is a triumphal arch and the symbol of Berlin. It is located on the Pariser Platz and dates back to the 18th century when it was loveliest of Berlin's 18 city gates, and is the only one that remains today.

    The gate was incorporated into the Berlin wall during the years of Communist government, and became part of East Germany. When it was re-opened in 1989 it became a symbol of reunification of the two sides of this great city.

    The Brandenburg Gate consists of twelve Greek style columns, six on each side. The 6 metre high sculpture on top of the gate is called the Quadriga. It was created in 1794 as a symbol of peace, and consists of a horse-drawn chariot being driven by the winged goddess of victory.

    This is indeed an impressive landmark, and is looking particularly good after its recent-ish restoration. Though I must say I was a little surprised to see a branch of Starbucks just a few metres away!

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    The Brandenburg Gate

    by mallyak Written Dec 6, 2010

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    The Brandenburg Gate was commisioned by Friedrich Wilhelm II to represent peace. The Gate was designed by Karl Gotthard Langhans, the Court Superintendent of Buildings, and the main architectural design of this landmark hasn't changed since it was first constructed in 1791. Ironically the gate was incorporated into the Berlin wall during the years of Communist government. The Brandenburg gate is probably the most well-known landmark in Berlin, it now stands as a symbol of the reunification of the two sides of this great city

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    Day 2 - Encapsulating The City's History

    by johngayton Updated Nov 8, 2010

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    The Gate In Its Restored Glory
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    Since in its construction in 1791 the Brandenburg Gate has played a leading role in all of the City's major historical events. Commissioned originally by Friedrich Wilhelm II as a symbol of peace the statue of Victoria on the Quadriga's chariot on top of the gate was designed with a laurel wreath. In 1806 Napoleon looted the statue and had it transported to Paris. After Napoleon's defeat the Quadriga was returned to Berling and Victoria's wreath replaced by the Germanic symbols of victory - an Iron Cross and an Eagle.

    During Prussian rule and later during that of Hitler the gate came to represent the nation's militaristic stregnth with major parades celebrating military triumphs passing through and down the wide boulevard of Unter den Linden.

    Towards the end of World War II the gate was severely damaged, but remained structurally intact. After the war the gate became located in the Soviet sector and was once again used as a city gate but this time between the now divided East and West Berlin. In 1958 the gate was restored with the East Germans funding the main structure and the West Berlin Senate replacing the Quadriga. However before the Quadriga was reinstated the East German authorities had the Iron Cross and Eagle removed.

    When The Wall went up in 1961 the area around the gate became part of the restricted area of no-man's land between the main wall and the "baby" wall.

    With the fall of The Wall the gate became a symbol of the desire to reunite the two Germany's and on the night of the announcement, November 9th 1989, Pariser Platz hosted a major celebratory demonstration. On December 22nd that year the gate was reopened and symbolically one of the first to pass through was the West German Chancellor, Helmut Kohl, where he was greeted by his Eastern counterpart Hans Modrow.

    After the country's re-unification the following year the gate reverted to its original status as symbolic of peace and that of the re-united nation.

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  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    Brandenburg Gate

    by Roadquill Written Oct 11, 2010

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    The Tor is quite an imposing monument and seems to set itself off as the center of Berlin. There always seems to be a crowd around, thus it is tough to get pictures. A short walk to the Reichstag, the US Embassy and the British Embassy. A little more of a crowd when I stopped by in early October 2010 and the City was hosting a 20 year anniversary party of the Reunification of East and West Germany.

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  • azz8206's Profile Photo

    The Brandenburg Tor

    by azz8206 Written Sep 29, 2010

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    The Brandenburg Tor
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    During the Cold War, the gate sat in the middle of what was then the death strip in the middle of the Berlin Wall. Today it is a major tourist attraction and a monumental entry to Unter den Linden. It suffered considerable damage during WW2 and was fully restored in the early 2000's. In earlier years it was part of a medieval wall. Napoleon took the Quadriga, which sits atop the gate, to Paris after he defeated the Prussians in 1806 and after Napoleon's defeat in 1814 it was restored to Berlin and Victoria's wreath of oak leaves was added with a new symbol of Prussian power, the Iron Cross. It is regarded as one of Europe's most famous landmarks.

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  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    Brandenburg Gate

    by mindcrime Updated Aug 16, 2010

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    Brandenburg Gate
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    Brandenburg Gate is a landmark in Berlin. It used to be the monumental entry that led to the palace of the Prusian monarchy. It was built at the end of 18th century (between 1778-1791) by Carl Gotthard and it’s supposed to be the most beautiful among the 18 gates of the city(the only one we can see today).

    As you can see on pic 1 it has 12 huge Doric columns (in pairs) with tourists come and go non stop. The most interesting/funny moment on our visit there was when we saw the trooper from Star Wars standing in front of the Gate (pic 4)! Strange to see that but definitely better than the wall that was there behind the gate for 30 years. The Gate looks much better during the night when it’s lited up but I have only analog pics.

    On the top of the gate you can see the Quadriga, a sculpture that shows Victory in a chariot that is drawn by four horses.

    The gate is the spot where parades, demonstrations, rallies etc take place.
    Usually, there are people dressed like officers(pic 2) from the Cold Era and for 1 euro you can take a pic with them or buy a “visa” for entering the territory :)

    At the back side we noticed a strange open space that looks like a cemetery (pic 3), we got lost there for a while.

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Brandenburger Tor:La puerta de-Brandemburg- Gate

    by elpariente Written Mar 6, 2010

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    La Puerta de Brandemburgo se encuentra en el centro de la ciudad, separando la zona del Tiergarten y la avenida Unter den Linden
    No es un arco del triunfo, como puede parecer a simple vista, sino simplemente de una puerta de acceso al que era, en el momento de su construcción, el Nuevo Berlín , inspirada en el Propileo o puerta de acceso a la Acrópolis de Atenas
    Las columnas no tienen la misma separación , las centrales son las más anchas , que es por donde pasaba la familia Real , su séquito utilizaba los pasos que están al lado y el pueblo pasaba por los extremos que son los más estrechos
    Encima de la Puerta hay una estatua de cobre conocida como la Cuadriga, en la cual está la diosa de la Victoria montada en un carro arrastrado por cuatro caballos. Esta estatua no estuvo siempre ahí, ya que hubo un periodo en el cual Napoléon se la llevó a París a modo de trofeo bélico (luego sería recuperada por los prusianos).
    Cuando se construyó el Muro de Berlín, este monumento se quedó el la “franja de la muerte”, es decir, entre los dos muros que dividían la ciudad y así permaneció casi treinta años en tierra de nadie, sin acceso desde el este ni desde el oeste, fue el símbolo de una Alemania dividida.

    The Brandenburg Gate is located in the city centre, separating the area of the Tiergarten and Unter den Linden
    It is not a triumphal arch, as it may be seem at first glance, but simply a gateway to that was, at the time of construction, the New Berlin and it is inspired by the Propylaeum or gateway to the Acropolis in Athens
    Columns do not have the same spacing, those in the centre are the widest and is where the royal family passed ; their entourage used the spaces that are next and the normal people passed through the extremes that are the narrower
    Above the door is a copper statue known as the Quadriga, which is the goddess of victory riding a chariot drawn by four horses. This statue was not always there, as there was a period in which Napoleon took her to Paris as a trophy of war (then it would be retaken by the Prussians).
    When they built the Berlin Wall, the monument stood on the "death strip" that is, between the two walls that divided the city and remained so for almost thirty years in no man's land, without access from the east nor from the west, it was the symbol of a divided Germany.

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  • illumina's Profile Photo

    Brandenburg Gate

    by illumina Written Nov 17, 2009

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    The Brandenburg Gate is the only surviving gate of a series of entrances into the city through the wall encircling Berlin. It is the monumental entry to Unter den Linden which originally led to the palace of the Prussian monarchs. It was designed by Carl Gotthard Langhans, and constructed between 1778 and 1791. It consists of 12 Doric columns in six pairs, which form 5 passageways - originally ordinary citizens were only allowed to use the outer two. The sculpture on top of the gate is known as the Quadriga; it depicts Victory in a chariot drawn by four horses.

    It is situated at the junction of Unter den Linden and Ebertstraße, next to Pariser Platz.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Branderburg tor

    by lina112 Written Jul 6, 2009

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    The historical Branderburger tor, a symbol of the division during the Cold War, is now an icon of German reunification. Designed by Carl Gotthard Lanhans, was considered the most beautiful of the 18 city gates. In 1987, against this background, the then U.S. president Ronald Reagan, gave the famous words, "Lord Gorbachow, breaks down this wall."

    La historica Branderburger tor, simbolo de la division durante la guerra fria, es ahora el icono de la reunificacion alemana. Diseñada por Carl Gothard Lanhans, era considerada la mas bonita de las 18 puertas de la ciudad. En 1987, frente a este escenario, el entonces presidente de los Estados Unidos Ronald Reagan, pronunció las famosas palabras, "Señor Gorbachow, derribe este muro".

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  • Emile72's Profile Photo

    Berlin's famous landmark

    by Emile72 Written Apr 27, 2009

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    The Brandenburg Gate, Berlin's only remaining city gate, is the true symbol of the city. Because it was situated in the no man's land just behind the »wall, it also became symbolic of the division of the city.

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  • NeillTate's Profile Photo

    Brandenburg Gate, Berlin

    by NeillTate Updated Mar 7, 2009

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    Brandenburg Gate 2008

    The Brandenburg Gate is the trademark of Berlin. The main entrance to the city, surrounded by the wall for thirty years, was known throughout the world as a symbol for the division of the city and for the division of the world into two power blocs.

    Today's international visitors to Pariser Platz come to re-experience this first gateway to the city, and to enjoy the long-denied freedom to walk through this magnificent work of art and look at it up close.

    We decided to view the Brandenburg Gate as one of our must sees while on our 3 night visit in February 2008 to Berlin.

    We went to the Brandenburg Gate during the day and returned again armed with my camera and tripod. The picture was taken at around 17.30hrs just as the sun was going down.

    The Gate is totally different at night, which is fantastically lit up to highlight the twelve Doric columns, six to each side, forming five passageways and the Quadriga, a chariot drawn by four horses driven by Victoria, the Roman goddess of victory

    Restoration work carried out on the gate from 2000 to 2002 by the Stiftung Denkmalschutz Berlin (Berlin Monument Conservation Foundation).

    Today, it is considered one of Europe's most famous landmarks.

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