Brandenburger Tor, Berlin

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Pariser Platz, Berlin-Mitte

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  • Brandenburger Tor
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  • Brandenburger Tor
    by EasyMalc
  • Brandenburger Tor
    by EasyMalc
  • aeroarce's Profile Photo

    A must in Berlin

    by aeroarce Written Sep 25, 2007

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    Always remember the pictures of the 89 when the wall felt down, I still remember the surroundings of the Brandemburger Tor full of people on both sides of the wall standing on top of the wall, waiting for the time when they could cross the border lines and be free. now days all the landscape has change a lot, just almost 20 years and little resambles of that era, new buildings, magnificent buildings, hotels and embassies are around this wonderful gate. in one side the Tiergarten, on the other side Mitte.

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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Brandenburg Gate

    by smirnofforiginal Updated Aug 22, 2007

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    The last remaining of the city's eighteen 18th century gates. This is the symbol of Berlin.

    On top of the gate is Quadriga, originally a symbol of peace. Quadriga was dismantled by Napoleon in 1806 and taken to Paris. It was returned to Berlin in 1814 and declared a symbol of Victory. The goddess Quadriga then received her (Prussian) eagle and iron cross. It was here, in May 1945, that the Soviet flag was raised. (The gate sits in East Berlin).

    The north room is the Raum der Stille and opposite is a souvineer shop / tourist information.

    In front of the gate is the Pariser Platz upon which sits Hotel Adlon (famous people that have stayed here include Charlie Chaplin & Bill Clinton). From Pariser Platz runs Unter den Lindon. Behind the gate is Tiergarten Park.

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  • zuyao's Profile Photo

    Brandenburg Gate - Symbol of Berlin

    by zuyao Written Aug 10, 2007
    Brandenburg Gate

    Images of Berlin often include the famous Brandenburg Gate. So this gate is a must-visit when you are Berlin. It is not a very grand or magnificent monument. However, it is more admired for its historical value - a symbol of unity and freedom after the unification of Berlin.

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  • mileslunn's Profile Photo

    Bradenburg Gate

    by mileslunn Written Jul 25, 2007

    Built in the 1700s, this has become a major monument in Berlin. It was what divided the city between East and West later on and also was where Reagan gave his famous "tear down this wall" speech back in 1987. It is also right in front of the hotel where Michael Jackson dangled the baby from.

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  • fairestmom's Profile Photo

    Berlin's only remaining city gate

    by fairestmom Updated Jul 13, 2007

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    street mimes in front of Brandenburg Gate
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    Seeing the Brandenburg Gate in person was such an amazing thing. It's so beautiful and grande--the entrance to the Unter den Linden boulevard. It was such a thrill to walk through this gateway and to see all those people going about their daily lives.

    After the Fall of the Wall the Brandenburg Gate was re-opened on December 22, 1989. Johannes, our exchange student in 1991, gave me a piece from the Wall when he lived with us. A true piece of history!

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  • Brandenburg Gate

    by Mariajoy Updated Jun 10, 2007

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    looking west
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    Dating from 1788-91, the "Gate of Peace" designed by Karl Gotthard Langhans is probably one of Berlin's most well known landmarks.

    During the early 70's when I lived here in Berlin it was of course impossible to walk through the arches as the Berlin Wall ran directly in front of it and only the top was visible from the west. It's very different now thankfully.

    It was funny being asked by an American guy to take his picture, standing in front of the gate where the Quadriga faces east. He spoke to me in his best German - I didn't bother explaining that I wasn't.

    Mein Hosts informed me that during the 90's the Pariser Platz on the east side had been transformed into the busy thriving area it is now with the Hotel Adlon and Academy of Arts. Here you can also pick up one of the many Rickshaws that dart around the city.

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  • lashr1999's Profile Photo

    Brandenburger Tor

    by lashr1999 Written Jun 3, 2007

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    The Brandenburger Tor was designed by Karl Langhans and erected from 1778-1791. He modeled it after the entrance of the Acropolis in Athens. Over the years the gate has symbolize a variety of ideas. The gate was originally used to symbolize peace. During the Nazi times it was the site of Nazi celebrations in 1933 and was used to symbolize Hitler’s rise to power. The gate during the cold war became a symbol of the division of East and West Berlin. When the wall fell the gate became a symbol for reunification.
    Location wise it is near the Reichstag, the War Memorial and the Tiegarten. Today, the area around the gate called Pariser Platz has undergone redevelopment and revitalization. The area is very lively with many businesses. However, one business stirred up a lot of controversy when it first opened up. Right next to the gate is a Starbucks. In my option I would agree with other people who complain that it detracts from the history of the place and obstructs the view. When we were there, a variety of street performers where performing around the gate. It was cool to see some German break dancers dancing

    If you are planning a visit to Berlin stop by the tourist center at the Gate which opens from 10AM-6PM. The tourist bus 100 stops near the gate.

    One interesting tidbit is that opposite the gate is the hotel Hotel Adlon. It was here that Michael Jackson dangled his baby over a balcony. You should have heard the jokes everyone told when seeing that hotel. The most popular was: Why did Michael Jackson dangle his baby over a balcony? A: Because his wife asked him to drop the children off somewhere.

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  • trvlrtom's Profile Photo

    Brandenburg Tor and environs

    by trvlrtom Updated May 1, 2007

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    A view from the west

    This monument is, of course, a must see for any Berlin visitor. My recommendation is just to take the time to walk around the gate from both sides to take in the atmosphere of this long time focal point of Berlin. On the eastern side, in Pariser Platz, be sure to peek into the bank building on the south side of the square to see the huge interior sculpture designed by the North American architect Frank O. Gehry, famous for the museum in Bilbao, Spain. The embassy on the north side is worth taking note of, as well as the new British embassy on the side street heading south - with its original and whimsical architecture.
    In case you've heard that the statue on the top had been switched around during the DDR years, as stated in at least one popular guidebook, this is just an untrue rumor - or so say my Berliner friends say.

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  • Luchonda's Profile Photo

    Berlin, after November 1989

    by Luchonda Updated Apr 30, 2007

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    Just be nice..... in Berlin
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    Pictures taken in Mechelen, near Brussels, but reminding me at the history of Berlin and Germany in general, the actually "Dream Cars" after the cold war, the car industry had the golden years, Ford... VW...DKW... and of course the friendly people, BTW... In the USA you will find a lot of second car plates like shown in the first picture

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  • stevemt's Profile Photo

    Brandenberg Gate

    by stevemt Updated Apr 24, 2007

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    The Gate
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    The Brandenburg Gate consists of twelve Roman Doric columns, six on each side. This allows for five roadways, although originally ordinary citizens were only allowed to use the outer two. Above the gate is the Quadriga, with the goddess of peace driving it (the Quadriga) in triumph. The gate stands 26 m (65 ft) high, 65.5 m (213 ft) wide and 11 m (36 ft) thick.

    Finally, when the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, the gate symbolized freedom and the unity of the city. It re-opened on 22 December 1989 when the West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl walked through to be greeted by the East German Prime Minister, Hans Modrow.

    I would have loved to have been there when the wall came crashing down.

    The gate now symbolises unity.

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  • alancollins's Profile Photo

    The Brandenburg Gate

    by alancollins Written Apr 22, 2007

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    The Brandenburg Gate was constructed in 1791 and stand as a focal point at the western end of Unter den Linden. It is the only remaining gate of 18 that once stood around Berlin. It was built as a triumphal arch celebrating the Prussian capital. The Brandenburg Gate has been damaged over the years with the last renovation taking place in 2000 at a cost of 3,000,000 dollars. On top of the gate stands a Quadriga with the goddess of peace driving it. Over the years it has had an eventful life from being carted off by the French after the Napoleon conquered Berlin to facing in different directions. During the life of the Berlin Wall it stood in isolation as a sad reminder of those events, but immediately became a place of celebration when the wall came down

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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Brandenburg Gate

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Apr 18, 2007

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    Probably the most photographed monument in all of Germany. In Cold War Times, the Brandenburg Gate was in the Eastern communist part of Germany (GDR). The Berlin Wall was only a few meters apart; no trespassing, so you had to use a viewing platform to get a better view. Hard to imagine nowadays.

    From the Brandenburg Gate, other monuments like the Reichstag and the Government Quarter, the "Siegessäule" and the Holocaust Memorial are in walking distance.

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  • elgin99's Profile Photo

    Brandenburger Tor _ Brandenburg Gate

    by elgin99 Written Apr 3, 2007

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    Brandenburger Tor
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    The Brandenburg Gate is a former city gate and the symbol of Berlin. It is located between the Pariser Platz and the Platz des 18. März and is the only remaining gate of a series through which one formerly entered Berlin.
    It constitutes the monumental termination of Unter den Linden, the renowned boulevard of Lime trees which led directly to the royal residence. It was commissioned by Friedrich Wilhelm II as a sign of peace and built from 1791.
    The Brandenburg Gate consists of twelve Roman Doric columns.The design of the gate was based on the Propylea, the gateway to the Acropolis in Athens.
    Finally, when the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, the gate symbolized freedom and the unity of the city. It re-opened on 22 December 1989 when the West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl walked through to be greeted by the East German Prime Minister.
    The Berlin Quadriga on the gate is probably the most famous in the world.

    It was a wonderful emotion to stroll through under the gate, this time from the West to the East of the town. Reminded same time that last I stood on the east side and could only have a look westward, but not go. :))

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  • heitzenrater's Profile Photo

    Tour this!!

    by heitzenrater Updated Mar 26, 2007

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    Germany's most recognisable symbol is not as large as many visitors expect, yet its history is rich and fascinating. Built in 1791, the Brandenburg Gate was modelled on the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. The Quadriga statue on top of the Gate - designed by sculptor Gottfried Schadow - represents Victoria, the Goddess of Peace, riding a four-horse chariot. This was one of Berlin's original 14 city gates, yet the only remaining evidence of the other gates are the names of underground stations such as Kottbusser Tor and Schlesisches Tor. The Brandenburg Gate and Pariser Platz have played centre stage to numerous turbulent historical events. In 1806 Napoleonic troops took the Quadriga statue back to Paris as a war trophy, only to have it returned to Berlin when the French lost the war. And during the Nazi era Pariser Platz was the Nazis' favourite backdrop for torch-lit processions and military parades. The Gate sustained heavy damage during World War II and was restored in the 1950s. After the Berlin Wall was erected in 1961, the Brandenburg Gate became inaccessible to the citizens of both Germanys and came to be regarded as the symbol of Cold War divisions. When the Wall fell on 9 November 1989, hundreds of thousands flocked here to celebrate the end of the Cold War and the beginning of a new world order. The north wing of the Gate houses a 'quiet room' where visitors are invited to sit and contemplate in peace. The south wing houses a tourist information office (10a-6p Monday-Sunday).

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  • stellar-stella's Profile Photo

    Berlin's Triumph Gate

    by stellar-stella Written Feb 28, 2007

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    This Gate is located in Pariser Platz(Paris Square), which is the most important square in Berlin. It would be another long story why Berlin's most important square is named "Paris Square", yes, you r right, it has something to do with Napoleon... Well, I can't retell this story now...Acturally this is the starting point of the free tour I joined. And I guess it's also a good meeting point for you and your friends to start your hanging-around...

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