Gendarmenmarkt, Berlin

4.5 out of 5 stars 81 Reviews

Gendarmenmarkt, Berlin-Mitte +49-0-30-227-3-04-31

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Deutscher Dom
    Deutscher Dom
    by EasyMalc
  • Gendarmenmarkt
    by EasyMalc
  • Franzoesischer Dom
    Franzoesischer Dom
    by EasyMalc
  • m-joy's Profile Photo

    Schauspielhaus

    by m-joy Written Jun 13, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Situated right between the German and French dome at the Gendarmenmarkt this beautiful hall of concerts was built by the famous architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel in 1820. Schinkel had a very particular architectural style.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Music

    Was this review helpful?

  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Gendarmenmarkt

    by elpariente Written Mar 5, 2010

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Para muchos es una de las plazas más bonitas de Berlín
    El nombre de Gendarmenmarkt (mercado de los gendarmes) proviene del regimiento hugonote de los Gens d'Armes, que se instaló en la plaza cuando la comunidad hunogote era perseguida en Francia y Guillermo I le dió refugio , derechos ciudadanos y protegió su libertad religiosa a pesar de que Berlín era protestante.
    Federico I de Prusia le concedió, tanto a la comunidad luterana como a la comunidad reformada francesa, un lugar para construir sus respectivas iglesias y así edificaron en cada extremo de la plaza El Französischer Dom (Catedral Francesa)y el Deutscher Dom( Catedral alemana ) que son dos iglesias muy parecidas
    En el centro de la Plaza está la Konzertthaus en la que destaca delante de ella el monumento a Schiller que está alineado con la posición en la que está colocado el director de la orquesta dentro de la sala

    For many people it is one of the most beautiful squares in Berlin
    The name Gendarmenmarkt comes from the Huguenot regiment Gens d'Armes, which was installed in the square when Huguenot community was persecuted in France and William I gave them haven, protected its citizens' rights and religious freedom although Berlin was Protestant.
    Frederick I of Prussia was granted to both the Lutheran community as the French Reformed community, a place to build their churches and they were built at each end of the square , The French Dom (French Cathedral) and the Deutscher Dom (German Cathedral) , two churches that are very similar
    In the centre of the square is the Konzertthaus where highlight in its front the monument to Schiller that is aligned with the position position of the orchestra conductor in the room

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    Schauspielhaus, now: Konzerthaus (Concert Hall)

    by Kakapo2 Written Jan 15, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Schauspielhaus (theatre) which became Konzerthaus (concert hall/philharmony) in 1994 is sitting between the German and the French Dome on the western side of Gendarmenmarkt. It was designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel and built on the ruins of the National Theatre which had burnt down. Construction time was from 1817 to 1821. The Baroque transformation took place in 1903 and 1904.

    Originally the Schauspielhaus was just a brick building. It became a splendid building by screening the exterior with glorious sandstone panels.

    After the destruction of World War II only the exterior was reconstructed true to the original. The interior was completedly altered. Instead of a theatre with a stage they built a concert hall with space for an 1850 people strong audience. Inauguration was in 1984. Ten years later the Schauspielhaus was renamed into “Konzerthaus Berlin”.

    Guided tours on most Saturdays at 1pm, phone (030) 20309-2343, fee 3 Euro

    Free tours with volunteers must be checked on the blackboard on site or on the internet website.

    Registration for group tours:
    press@konzerthaus.de
    Phone (030) 20309-2343

    The Concert Hall was designed by Schinkel. The Concert Hall seen from the German Dome.
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Music
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • johanl's Profile Photo

    GENDARMENMARKT

    by johanl Updated Nov 1, 2003

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The center of Friedrichstad was once designed on the 18th and 19th centuries to become one of the most beautiful squares in Europe. The Contstable's Square.
    The square features the Schauspielhaus, and the French and German Cathedrals.

    PARISER DOM
    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • fipsi's Profile Photo

    Gendarmenmarkt

    by fipsi Written Aug 27, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The most beautiful square I saw in Berlin! On two sides you have churches that look very similar (the French church and the German church), on another side you find one Berlin's most beautiful theaters (Schauspielhaus) and in front of the theater there is quite a nice monument for Friedrich Schiller.

    The name comes from a regiment of guards ("Gens d'armes") that had its station and its stables there. The poet E.T.A. Hoffmann lived at that square from 1815 to 1822.

    Gendarmenmarkt
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    Französischer Dom: Museum of the Huguenots' Life

    by Kakapo2 Written Jan 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The church beside the French Dome is the French Friedrichstadtkirche, named after the suburb Friedrichstadt. (See extra tip.)

    To build the purpose-less French Dome beside this church between 1780 and 1785 the French Huguenots’ cemetery had to be relocated. In exchange the Huguenots got the right to use the dome for all times. They had once fled their Catholic home country for practising their protestant religion after the reformation by Calvin.

    Dome and Friedrichstadtkirche were nearly completely destroyed in World War II but were reconstructed between 1981 and 1987. The Dome is used today as the Huguenots’ Museum (Hugenottenmuseum). It displays the history and the life of the French immigrants.

    Open Tue – Sat 12pm – 5pm, Sun 11am – 5pm
    Entry fee 2 Euro

    The French Dome, seen from the German Dome. A huge dome beside modest Friedsrichstadtkirche.
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Gendarmenmarkt - Französischer Dom

    by sabsi Updated Sep 16, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gendarmenmarkt is often referred to as Berlin's most beautiful square. And with the two churches which almost look alike and the Konzerthaus between them it looks really impressive and it's a nice place to sit down for a drink and some rest from all the walking.

    The French cathedral is the cathedral on your right when facing the Konzerthaus. It was built for the Huguenot in the beginning of the 18th century. There is an exhibition inside nowadays.

    Franz��sischer Dom

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    Schillerdenkmal - Monument of Goethe's Colleague

    by Kakapo2 Written Jan 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Only in the first instant it is surprising to find a statue of Friedrich von Schiller on Berlin’s Gendarmenmarkt, as we Schwaben from the land of Württemberg consider Schiller as “our” poet and philosopher. But in fact he was – together with Goethe – Germany’s greatest classic writer, philosopher, dramatist and poet, and so it is absolutely normal that he has a place in front of Berlin’s former national theatre.

    Schiller was born in Marbach on the river Neckar, near Stuttgart, on 10 November 1759 in the south of Germany, and he died on 9 May 1805 in Weimar, only 45 years old, from acute pneumonia. On Goethe’s request he later was buried at Schiller’s side. In the city of Weimar both poets stand side by side on a monument. He was ennobled in 1802, by the addition of “von” in front of his last name.

    Schiller’s plays are part of the standard repertoire of German theatres. His first big hit was “Die Räuber” (The Robbers) in 1776. The premiere in Mannheim (1782) was a huge success, especially young people loved it. However, the reigning Duke of Württemberg was not impressed and imprisoned the poet for two weeks and forbid him to write comedies and similar stuff.

    Then Schiller wrote “Kabale und Liebe” (Intrigue and Love) and “Don Carlos”, later “Wallenstein”, „Maria Stuart“, „Wilhelm Tell“, and „Die Jungfrau von Orléans“ (The Maid of Orleans). I think everybody at my age and time had to learn “Das Lied von der Glocke” (Song of the Bell) by heart, and my father still knows every word of it.

    Many of Schiller’s poems and dramas became musical pieces. You might have heard “Ode an die Freude” (Ode to the Happiness) which Beethoven used for this 9th symphony. Verdi adapted several of Schiller’s play for his operas, “Don Carlos” is just one of them.

    Schiller in front of the German Dome.
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Gendarmenmarkt

    by Sjalen Written Nov 6, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is often considered the most beautiful square in Berlin and whilst I agree that it is beautiful, it is not stunning in a "Grand Place" style. There are however the two impressive twin churches, the French and the German Church respectively, in either end of the square. The German is used as an exhibition centre today but we never visited as most guides called it a boring place. Instead, we sat in the lovely square and listened to buskers and had a beer at the great Concert Hall. You can also go for horse and carriage rides around the blocks here.

    German Church
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Mikebb's Profile Photo

    Gendarmenmarkt Delightful Square - The 2 Doms

    by Mikebb Updated Jun 30, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Our visit to the Gendarmenmarkt was at sunset, our intention being to view the beautiful Doms , Theatre and other buildings and activities within the square, before having dinner at the nearby German Beer Hall.

    We arrived a little late to take good photos of these beautiful Doms, however it was an ideal time to view the many activities within the square. We sat and enjoyed the activities, particularly the people arriving for the evening performance at the Schauspielhaus (Theatre).

    The Gendarmenmarkt was established during the 17th century.

    Gendarmenmarkt  - Dom Gendarmenmarkt - Dom Inscription - Gendarmenmarkt Dom Dom - Gendarmenmarkt
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    Deutscher Dom: Exhibition of Democracy

    by Kakapo2 Written Jan 15, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The German Church beside the later added dome-shaped building on Gendarmenmarkt was built from 1701 to 1708. Already 80 years later it crumbled, so it was demolished and reconstructed in Baroque style.

    The purpose-less dome-crowned tower was added from 1780 to 1785. It was badly damaged in World War II and reconstructed between 1982 and 1996. In 2002 it even got a purposed. The building is used for an exhibition of German parliament, telling the story of Germany’s parliamentary democracy. The title is: “Wege, Irrwege, Umwege” – paths, meanders, deviations.

    If you are not interested in this exhibition there is not more to do than to have a look up to the top of the tower where you can see the sky through a round skylight.

    Not sure about the entry fee. On the internet I read it is free but I think to remember that you would have had to pay a fee.

    Open Tue – Sun 10am – 7pm (October to April only until 6pm), guided tours at 11am, 1pm and 4pm

    Not very different to the French Dome. The German Dome, the church on the left.
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Gendarmenmarkt

    by Nemorino Written Oct 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Photos:
    1. French "Dom" at the Gendarmenmarkt
    2. Concert House

    The German word "Dom" usually means cathedral, but the German Dom and the French Dom at the Gendarmenmarkt are not cathedrals at all, they are just, well, buildings with domes.

    In the German Dom there is a museum of the German parliament, and in the French Dom (first photo) there is a museum devoted to the Huguenots, French Protestants who fled from France to avoid persecution at various periods starting in the sixteenth century.

    The Protestant rulers of Berlin welcomed the Huguenots with open arms, not only because of their religion but also because most of them were skilled workers in a variety of trades -- and because they spoke French, a particularly suave language that every self-respecting German aristocrat wanted to learn.

    The Concert House (second photo) was originally built from 1818 to 1821 by Karl Friedrich Schinkel as a theater. The original building was destroyed in the Second World War. After a long hiatus it was rebuilt as a concert house from 1979 to 1984.

    1. French 2. Concert House
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Gendarmenmarkt

    by croisbeauty Updated May 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There excist interesting story regarding name of the square, its current name is derived from the Regiment Gens d'Armes who had their stables here from 1736 to 1773. Starting from 1777 the square was redeveloped under the plans by Georg Christian Unger.
    Nowadays the square is quiet place surrounded by three landmark buildings; Franzosisher Dom, Deutcher Dom and the Konzerthaus. In the central part of the square is a statue of Friedrich Schiller, a most famous German poet.

    Gendarmenmarkt Gendarmenmarkt Gendarmenmarkt Gendarmenmarkt Gendarmenmarkt

    Was this review helpful?

  • Poda's Profile Photo

    pacefull place....

    by Poda Updated Jun 19, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    it was the center of Berlin during 1900 period.
    One of the place where you can breath the old Berlin.

    Just to sit there and look at what happened is nice... all kind of people and situation.. it is amazing.

    Claudia, yes it is a nice square!!!

    Was this review helpful?

  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Wandering The City #11 - Churches With Bars!

    by johngayton Updated Oct 11, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Having kicked the robots' ball away from them for a final time my wanderings took me up the shop-lined boulevard of Friedrichstrasse just off of which I came across the Gendarmenmarkt. This is one of Berlin's classical European-style squares and features a trio of stunning 18th century buildings, two of which were churches and the third is the Schinkel Konzerthaus.

    The concert hall is home to its eponymous orchestra (formerly the Berlin Symphonic Orchestra) whilst the churches (the Deutscher und Französischer Doms) are now museums with terraced bars overlooking the square.

    I'd already done my museum bit for the day and so a quick beer was enjoyed at the aptly-named Refugium cafe of the French Cathedral. This is a pleasant spot to sit and watch the world go by even if the world is mostly my fellow tourists!

    Bar At The French Church Bar At The German Church No Bar At The Concert Hall!
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Beer Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Berlin

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

22 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Gendarmenmarkt
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
11 Reviews
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
0.1 miles away
Show Prices

View all Berlin hotels