Graveyards, Berlin

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  • Graveyards
    by alancollins
  • Graveyards
    by alancollins
  • Graveyards
    by alancollins
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    Alter Garnisonsfriedhof

    by alancollins Written Dec 20, 2013

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    The Old Garrison Cemetery covers an area of 0.9 ha is one of the oldest cemeteries in Berlin and dates back to 1706. The cemetery was split between officers and men and was used until 1867 when it was changed into a park. During world war two it was used as a burial site for some 350 war victims. During the 1970s a lot of the graves were removed leaving only some from the later Prussian era, none of the earliest graves survive. There are still some interesting graves that have survived and the cemetery is now a listed monument.

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    Russian Orthodox Cemetery and Church

    by alancollins Updated Apr 16, 2013

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    The Russian Orthodox Cemetery in Berlin is the only one of its kind in Germany. The entrance gate contains 9 bells, the oldest bell dating back to 1898. The bells from the entrance gate were taken during WW2 but later found and returned by the Soviets. The cemetery which is only 2 acres in size was purchased in 1892 and 4000 tons of Russian soil was transported to the site so that Russians could be buried in the earth of their homeland. The centre piece of the cemetery is the church of St. Constantine and St. Helena which was completed in 1894 and is the oldest of 3 Russian Orthodox churches in Berlin.

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    Waldfriedhof, Zehlendorf

    by alancollins Updated Apr 15, 2013

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    Having visited the Willy Brandt Forum I decided I would pay my respects by visiting his grave. It is located in Waldfriedhof, Zehlendorf. This a large cemetery set in a woodland setting so make sure you locate the grave from the plan at the entrance or you will be wandering around aimlessly. Bus #118 stops outside the cemetery. The cemetery is open from 0900 till dusk.
    The orbs in the photos is actually sleet.

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    Grave of Marlene Dietrich

    by alancollins Written Mar 2, 2013

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    Marlene Dietrich is probably better known by older members of VT. Born in 1901 in Berlin, she appeared on stage and acted in films. Her best known German film is The Blue Angel which was released in 1930 and it brought her international recognition. She moved to the USA appearing in more than 70 films including Destry Rides Again with James Stewart and Judgement at Nuremberg with Spencer Tracy. Whilst in London in 1937 she was approached by members of the Nazi Regime and offered large sums of money to return to Germany and become the foremost film star of the Third Reich. Known as someone who was not afraid to speak her mind she refused and applied to become an American Citizen in 1939. When the USA entered WW2 in 1941 she helped the war effort by entertaining troops and helping to sell war bond and is reputed to have help sell more bonds than anyone else. From the 50s onward she mainly appeared in cabaret shows. She returned to Germany in 1960 for a concert tour, which received mixed reviews as many Germans felt she had betrayed Germany during the war. She spent the last years of her life living as a virtual recluse in her Paris flat. She died on 06 May 1992 in Paris. She is buried in the small cemetery 'Friedhof Schöneberg III', close to her mother and where so was born. By public transport the cemetery can be reached from Bundesplatz S or U Bahn Station and then a short walk.

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    Dorotheenstädtischer Friedhof

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Apr 8, 2011

    This cemetary is one of the oldest graveyards of Berlin, dating back to 1762. Although quite small, many influential Germans have found their resting place here, among them writers Bertold Brecht and Anna Seghers, actress Helene Weigel, architect Schadow, president Johannes Rau, the philosophers Fichte and Marcuse, and members of the national resistance who were executed after the failed coup of 20.7.1944. The graveyard features many beautiful grave monuments.

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    Berlin War Cemetery

    by alancollins Written Oct 13, 2009

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    I only found the lesser known Berlin War Cemetery by accident whilst looking for something else on Google Earth. It contains nearly 3600 graves of which some 80% were of aircrew. This quiet location was chosen in 1945 after the war ended. This cemetery in keeping with other cemeteries in the Berlin Area is well tended with neat rows of identical headstones. You can contrast it with Soviet Cemeteries which have large memorials, symmetry and mass graves, and German Cemeteries which have graves and headstones at different angles with lots of trees.

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    Jewish cemetery

    by Rekap Updated Aug 14, 2006

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    The entrance: Memorial to murdered Jews
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    I only recently discovered the Jewish cemetery and it has quickly become one of my favourite places to go in Berlin. I am recommending a trip there to everyone these days. It's a bit out of the way, but definitely worth seeing. It's absolutely enormous: I've been there three times and have the impression that I haven't seen even half of it. It miraculously survived the Nazis and the Communists: although I've read that thousands of graves were damaged or destroyed by the Nazis, I've seen no sign of that. The cemetery is largely "suffering" from neglect due to a lack of funds, but the neglect actually makes it more beautiful: ivy covers everything and you can walk for ages in there without seeing anyone else. Reading the graves is fascinating and gives you and your companion lots to talk about.

    Men need to wear a head covering. A baseball cap is fine. If you don't bring something with you, you have to borrow a yarmulke at the flower shop at the entrance.

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    the grave of Felix Mendelssohn

    by margaretvn Updated Apr 16, 2006

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    the grave of Felix Mendelssohn
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    The composer of wonderful music Felix Mendelssohn was born in Dessau and is buried in Berlijn.
    We had been to Staffa and Fingel's Cave in Scotland; which inspired him to write a wonderful piece of music so we had to visit his grave. It is a very simple little grave in the Jewish graveyard in Berlin.

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  • Dorotheenstädtischer Friedhof

    by sabsi Written Sep 29, 2005

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    Dorotheenst��dtischer Friedhof
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    This small cemetary in Berlin-Mitte is one of the nicest and oldest graveyards in Berlin. Hence many famous people are buried here, among them are Johannes R. Becher, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Friedrich Schinkel, Hanns Eisler, Bertolt Brecht, Helene Weigel, John Heartfield etc.

    The cemetary is from 1762. The oldest grave that still exists is from 1807 (the one of Jacob Fröhlich).

    I liked the quietness of this place. It's very close to the busy setting of Berlin-Mitte but as soon as you enter the graveyard you are surrounded by a very relaxing quietness.

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    Gravestones and Greenery

    by TempNomad Written Jul 29, 2005

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    These were the most unique gravestones we saw.

    If you are like we are, you'll make sure to check out the graveyards. We enjoyed walking through a few and checking out the different stones and dates and names. The ones in this photo are relatively new, but there are some that are a few hundred years old. Very interesting. The graveyards are leafy and green and some are quite overgrown. It's peaceful, hence the name Friedhof.

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    by margaretvn Updated Aug 29, 2004

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    the grave of felix mendelsohn

    We had been to Staffa and Fingel's Cave in Scotland; which inspired him to write a wonderful piece of music so we had to visit his grave. It is a very simple little grave in the Jewish graveyard in Berlin.

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    Jüdischer Friedhof Weissensee (Jewish Cemetery Wei

    by alexberlin Written Oct 14, 2002

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    Construction of the Friedhof Weissensee, the fourth Jewish cemetery in Berlin, began in 1878. The architect Hugo Licht was awarded first prize in a design competition for his plan of yellow brick cemetery buildings and gravesites divided into triangles, rectangles and trapezoids. The intersections of the tree-lined avenues bordering the main path form circles, squares and octagons. Immediately behind the entrance is a circular plot containing a memorial for the six million Jews murdered by the National Socialists. To the right of the entrance, near the hall of mourning, is a row of honor for renowned Jewish personalities from the spheres of culture, science and business. The equality of humankind in death is symbolized in Jewish cemeteries by unadorned tombstones of equal height; gravesites are not reused. Weissensee also grants the right to an eternal resting place, but assimilating Jews adopted the heavily adorned grave fashion common in German cemeteries of the Wilhelminian era. Therefore very elaborate tombstones are located next to traditional, simple headstones. The architecturally designed family vaults are of particularly superior quality. The cemetery survived the Second World War relatively undamaged and is one of the largest of its kind in Europe today.

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    The Jewish cemetary.

    by Olaf_Janssen Written Aug 25, 2002

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    A lot of gravestones on a small area. It was a custom to put a stone with wishes on top of if.
    The museum with drwaings from jewish children who were deported could be emotional.
    Its a part of this city history you should not miss.

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    Visit the Dorotheenstadt...

    by seraphim Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Visit the Dorotheenstadt cemetery.
    If you, like me, are a lover of graveyards this one won't let you down. Numerous famous Berliners are burried here. One of them is playwrite Bertold Brecht, whose house is besides the cemetary: he would've been able to see his grave from his study! But actually I thought his grave was quite disappointing, many others are far nicer. There's also a rather moving mass grave with victims of the bombings at the end of WWII at the back of the graveyard.

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