History - World War II, Berlin

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  • History - World War II
    by alancollins
  • Stairs up to one of Speer's buildings.
    Stairs up to one of Speer's buildings.
    by alancollins
  • One of the Speer buildings
    One of the Speer buildings
    by alancollins
  • Gillianina's Profile Photo

    Sovietisches Ehrenmal

    by Gillianina Written Oct 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This monument is a memorial to the Soviets fallen during WW2. It's 25 meters high and was built using the marbe extracted from the ruins of Hitler's "New chancellor's office" and two Russian tanks among the first which entered Berlin on April 21 1945.

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    Hitler's Bunker

    by DrewV Written Aug 13, 2003

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    All that remains of Hitler's bunker is the location of the entrance: a parking lot behind a block of flats. Between those three saplings is the steel door leading to Hitler's final presidential "mansion." No plaque marks the spot; no sign records the place.

    Across the street from the Tiergarten, a large expanse that had been split by the Wall was chosen as the site of the new Holocaust Memorial. As the initial work was done to dig the foundation, the construction workers found the hidden entrance to Goebbel’s bunker. Ironic, isn’t it? The place where the Nazi Propaganda minister spent his last days before his, his wife’s, and his children’s self-inflicted deaths will be the monument to the people he helped to slaughter.

    A parking lot marks thesite of Hitler's honeymoon

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  • DrewV's Profile Photo

    Nazi-Era Berlin

    by DrewV Written Aug 13, 2003

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    After he was elected in 1933, Hitler put his personal stamp on Berlin. The trees of Unter Den Linden were cut, SA brownshirts went on the rampage, and Hitler commissioned Albert Speer, his personal architect, to make Berlin a capital worthy of a thousand-year empire. Well, his reign of terror lasted twelve years (substantially less than 1,000), and following Allied bombing, postwar makeovers, the Cold War, and reunification, surprisingly little remains of Hitler’s Berlin. What does still exist serves to remind us of the horrors of the period.

    The only Nazi building to last through the Allied bombing and Soviet reprisals was this one, the former Luftwaffe headquarters, now the ministry of finance. It's built in that big, grand, Albert Speer kind of way, but it's interesting to look at.

    Goering's building, now the treasury offices

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  • DrewV's Profile Photo

    The German War Memorial

    by DrewV Updated Aug 13, 2003

    0.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Moving back in time a little bit, we have the German War Memorial. This moving statue, set inside the former Imperial Armory, is dedicated to all those killed or injured in any war in which Germany has been involved in. Politically correct, yes, but moving nonetheless. The statue sits under an opening in the dome. When it snows, the mother and child are covered in snow. When the sun shines, it beats down upon them. When it rains, the tears roll down her cheeks.

    A touching monument to a tragic past

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  • Soviet Monument in Treptower Park

    by sabsi Written May 24, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Here you'll feel like being in Moscow, there's a huge monument built on a mausoleum, huge sculptures of the USSR Flag and many Sovjet Style stone carvings showing Lenin and fighting scenes or the war.

    The monument shows a huge Russian soldier rescueing a German child and detroying the swastika. Look at the size of the soldier (esp. his hand!) compared to the child. He is way too large in comparison!

    5000 Soviet soldiers who fought in Berlin at the end of WWII are buried there.

    Treptow Sovjet Monument
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Russian war memorial

    by barryg23 Updated May 20, 2003

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    During the Cold War, Russian security guards used to stand here at the Russian War Memorial on 24-hour watch. The memorial is now maintained by the German givernment I believe, and it's certainly an impressive structure. Tanks, supposedly from WW2, stand on either side of the monument, behind which there is a path leading to the Tiergarten.

    Russian war memorial

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Topographie des Terrors

    by barryg23 Updated May 7, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a museum detailing the horrors of the Nazi regime. It's on the site of the (now demolished) former Gestapo headquarters, beneath a surviing part of the Berlin wall in Niederkirchestrasse. Well worth a visit.

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  • Imbi's Profile Photo

    Anhalter Bahnhof

    by Imbi Written Dec 23, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The ruins of this railway station, once Berlins largest, and one of the biggest in Europe, would seem to be a reminder of war damage this city sustained. In fact, the building was only partially destroyed during the Second World War, but it was decided not to rebuild it, and instead the remnants were blown up. Nowadays the sad façade is the only reminder of this stations former grandeur.

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  • TinyTuck's Profile Photo

    "Topographie des Terrors" (Topography of Terror)

    by TinyTuck Written Nov 7, 2002

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This exibition about the Gestapo and the SS is located on the grounds of the former Gestapo-headquarter behind a piece of the Wall. The Wall is conserved in the same state it was after the border opening, that's why it has got so many marks and holes, caused by people wanting to destroy it and/or get a souvenir!
    This open-air exhibition shows original photos with German text. But you can get a walkman and tape in your onw language to listen to while looking at the pictures!
    It's for free!

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  • seraphim's Profile Photo

    Visit the free Topography of...

    by seraphim Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Visit the free Topography of Terror-exhibition.
    This is a very thorough exhibition about the Holocaust, and what came before and after it, with lots and lots of documents and pictures. It's all in German but I think you can get an English translation.

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  • sverige's Profile Photo

    Sachsenhausen...concentration...

    by sverige Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Sachsenhausen...concentration camp. A very important place for a history buff or any humanitarian. It is not what I would call a 'FUN' place to go, but a place I am glad I saw...and I will NOT forget what happened.
    It is a terrible place where many people were killed during the war. Terrible awful deaths. Much has been preserved, many photographs showing the time & era. It is an uncomfortable feeling while you are there, but, I am so glad I went so it is a part of me.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Russian WW11 Memorial

    by mvtouring Written Nov 1, 2008

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    I do not know much of this memorial, but I do seem to remember that it was erected for the Russian soldiers that died here during battle.

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  • Glbtrotter's Profile Photo

    Topography of Terror

    by Glbtrotter Written Apr 4, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A must see. Too bad most of the exhibition was not in English so you can't read interesting documents, but pictures speak for themselves.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

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  • DaveyCakes's Profile Photo

    Soviet War Memorial

    by DaveyCakes Written Mar 27, 2008

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    The Soviet War Memorial is in Treptower Park, about 10 minutes walk from the S-Bahn station of the same name. I visited on a snowy January day, when it was deserted...

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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Bullet holes

    by smirnofforiginal Written Aug 23, 2007

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    As you go around, particularly it seemed, in what was East Berlin, look at the buildings - there are many scars left from WWII - this photo shows many bullet holes.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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