History - World War II, Berlin

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    Platform 17 Memorial at Grunewald Station

    by alancollins Updated Aug 25, 2012

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    Platform 17 at Grunewald Railway Station is a memorial to the 50,000 Jews from Berlin, who were transported from this station to various concentration camps during World War 2. The 2 platforms have been re-laid with metal grilles, which have cast along the edge the numbers, dates and camps the Jews were sent too.

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    The German-Russian Museum

    by alancollins Updated Oct 23, 2007

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    The German-Russian Museum is housed in the former School of Pioneers in the Karlshorst District of Berlin. The building has a historical significance because the instrument of surrender was signed in the former officer’s mess on 8/9th May 1945 that ended WW2 in Europe. The museum covers major parts of the history between Germany and the Soviet Union before, during and after WW2. A copy of the surrender document is on display, together with a uniform of Marshall Zhukov, a film of the signing of the surrender document and the officer’s mess is laid out as on the night of surrender. The staff at the museum are friendly and some English is spoken, there is a small café, cloakroom and entrance to the museum is free. The exhibits only have information in German and Russian so it is essential to purchase a guide book in English that gives an overall explanation of the various rooms and exhibits. Outside the museum there are some artillery pieces and vehicles. This is a little known museum but a must for anyone with an interest in the history of WW2.

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    Gedenkstätte Plötzensee

    by alancollins Updated Sep 22, 2008

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    Gedenkstatte Plotzensee is a place of quiet reflection of what horror took place in the name of so called Nazi justice. The original prison was built between 1868 – 1879 and covered an area of 22 hectares and could accommodate 1,200 prisoners. When the Nazis came to power they set up the notorious People’s Court and the convicted prisoners where sent to various prisons including Plotzensee. An execution shed was set up next to the central prison building called House III, where prisoners were brought before execution. Under the Nazis the number of executions rose with over 1,000 taking place in 1943. After the failed plot to kill Hitler on the 20th July 1944, those who were thought to have been responsible were put on trial before the People’s Court. Most of the trials took place before the notorious Nazis judge Roland Freisler and were mere formalities with little chance for the accused to defend themselves. Many were sentenced to death and were hung with chicken wire in the exection shed at Plotzensee and the event filmed for Hitler to view. After the war House III which had been damaged by allied bombing was knocked down and the memorial built.

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    Die Spiegelwand (Mirrored Wall)

    by alancollins Written Oct 9, 2008

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    This was a controversial memorial when it was first thought of and was almost never constructed. It was erected in 1995 and consists of 18 polished stainless steel plates 9 metres wide and 3.5 metres in height. The memorial commemorates all the Jews from the Steglitz District who were sent to concentration camps. The memorial has the names, addresses and dates of birth of the victims, of which few survived the war. From some angles the memorial almost disappears and is difficult to see. The memorial reflects what is happening around it and signifies that life goes on. The downside to this was on the day I visited a market was taking place and the memorial was surrounded by boxes and stalls. I felt that another location free of market stalls but busy with people may have been better.

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    German Resistance Memorial Centre

    by alancollins Updated Aug 19, 2012

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    The Bendlerblock was originally built to house the German Naval Offices and it was extended to house the Headquarters of the Wehrmacht during WW2. The story would have ended there, had the courtyard not been used to execute some of the failed conspirators, involved in the plot to kill Hitler on 20th July 1944 including Claus von Stauffenberg. There is a memorial to the executions in the courtyard. The profile of the building has recently been raised after the screening of the film Valkyrie some filming of which took place at the building. On the second floor of the building is an exhibition to the history of German anti Nazi movements. The whole exhibition, which is free to visit, is all in German but audio guides are available for free, an id needs to be left. The first floor is used for special exhibitions that are regularly changed.
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    Man without Head

    by Kakapo2 Written Jan 3, 2008

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    Signs of the War.

    This man without head and dotted with bullet holes is sitting in front of Martin-Gropius-Bau. It is one of the few things in Berlin that were left with the damage suffered in the bombings of World War II. Another – and more striking and famous – example is Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedächtniskirche on Kurfürstendamm.

    There could not be a more suitable place, next to where the Wall once separated the East and the West, and next to the SS- and Gestapo headquarters, where all this terror originated that led to World War II and the horrors of genocide, murder and destruction.

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    Memorial to Johann Georg Elser

    by alancollins Written Feb 16, 2013

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    To most people the name Johann Georg Elser is unknown unlike the name Claus von Stauffenberg. Both tried to assassinate Adolf Hitler by setting off bombs and both failed for different reasons. Elser had worked as an engineer and a carpenter and used these skills to make and hide his bomb. Elser opposed National Socialism and did not trust Hitler's claims to want peace. With war breaking out on 01 September 1939 this made Elser more determined to complete his plan.
    Every year on the 08 November Hitler attended the anniversary of the 1923 Beer Hall Putsch in the Bürgerbräukeller, a large beer hall in Munich to give a speech to the surviving veterans of the Putsch. Elser had attended the anniversary speech in 1938 and had judged the security at the hall as poor and decided he would try to assassinate Hitler the following year when he gave his speech. Elser went to Munich weeks before the annual speech and regularly attended the beer hall hiding in the building each night. Each night Elser slowly hollowed out a pillar behind the speaker's rostrum intending to place a bomb inside it. Hitler's speech's were usually long winded affairs that went on for hours. Hitler had intended to fly back to Berlin after the speech but fog caused the flight to be cancelled. Due to the inclement weather Hitler started his speech earlier than usual so he could travel back to Berlin by train. The speech was also much shorter than usual and Hitler left the Beer Hall, 13 minutes before the bomb exploded killing 8 and injuring 63.
    Luck was not on Elser's side and he had already been arrested before the bomb went off as he tried to cross the border into Switzerland. As the parts fell into place and suspicion fell on Elser, he was tortured, confessed and was sent to the Sachsenhausen and then Dachau Concentration Camps. As the war was drawing to a close, Elser was shot dead on 09 April 1945 at Dachau and this was made to look like the results of an air raid.
    As Elser and the assassination attempt, which could have changed the course of history, become more well known several memorials have been erected. One of those was inaugurated on the 08 November 2011 in Wilhelmstraße adjacent to where Hitler's Reich Chancellery once stood . It was designed by Ulrich Klages and the sculpture is a 17 metre high silhouette of Elser and is lit at night giving it an eyrie appearance as you pass it. Close to the sculpture are information boards detailing the assassination attempt.

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    The Myth Germania Exhibition

    by alancollins Updated Apr 21, 2009

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    The Germania Exhibition runs until the 31st December 2009. It displays the Nazi’s ideas for the new world capital of Germania which would have replaced Berlin. The exhibition contains photographs and plans of what the new capital would have looked like. The show piece of the exhibition is a model of how the main area would have looked. The huge model was built for the film Downfall. The staff speak excellent English and there are English translations for all the exhibits apart from the film. The exhibition takes a good 2 hours to view but unfortunately no photography is allowed.

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    The Levetzowstrasse Memorial

    by alancollins Updated Apr 6, 2010

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    The Levetzowstrasse Memorial
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    The Levetzowstrasse Memorial is located at 7/8 Levetzowstrasse and it commemorates the former synagogue and collection point. The synagogue was one of the largest in Berlin and it survived Kristallnacht but was damaged during bombing latter in the war. From 1941 some 37,000 Jews were removed from their homes and taken to the synagogue which was used as a collection point. They were then transported by train to concentration and extermination camps. The memorial has a metal obelisk with the dates of the transports. There is a ramp with people huddling together as they are forced into a cattle car, which stands on rails.

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    Memorial to victims of Nazi military justice

    by alancollins Updated Mar 18, 2013

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    Close to the Bell Tower at the Olympic Stadium there is a little known memorial to commemorate the victims of Nazi military justice at Murellenberg. The hilly area has been used by the military since the 1840s and included barracks and shooting range, part of it is still used by the police. Most of this has now gone and it is now popular for walks and jogging. Between August 1944 and April 1945 approximately 230 soldiers were executed on the Murellenburg having first been tried at the Reich's War Court mainly for desertion or undermining military force. Most of those that were executed at now buried at Fort Hahneberg, Spandau. On 08 May 2002 a memorial designed by Patrica Pisani inaugurated. The memorial starts close to Waldbühne Concert Venue. It consists of a 700m forest path with 104 traffic mirrors placed along the route with 16 of the mirrors have lasered text of the events that happened.

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    Topography of Terror

    by Karlie85 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Topography of Terror

    The Topography of Terror is an open-air exhibit that stands on the land where the Nazi regime was headquartered from 1933 to 1945, including the Gestapo and SS offices. The Holocaust and many aspects of the Second World War were controlled from the buildings that used to be here. Now, it’s an exhibit with dozens of poster boards explaining in detail the history of the buildings and what happened in those building in the infamous time leading up to the war and during it. There are also some very interesting profiles on individual victims of the war as well as information about prisoners from different countries or ethnic groups. I underestimated how long the exhibit would take as there is a lot of detail and a lot of reading. I found most of it incredibly interesting and we spent at least an hour and a half reading the panels, and we skipped several of the less interesting looking ones. They are building a museum to replace the open-air exhibit, but it was still under construction in August 2009 when we visited.

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    Führerbunker

    by Karlie85 Written Sep 29, 2009

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    These days it's just a non-descript parking lot, and for years anyone who walked by wouldn't know what dark place used to lie beneath. It wasn't until Germany hosted the World Cup in 2006 that a plaque was put up to remember this spot. This is the site of one of Adolf Hitler's bunkers, the bunker where he spent the last few weeks of his life and where he and his companion, Eva Braun, committed suicide in 1945. Even though there's nothing to look at now other than the plaque showing the layout of the former bunker and explaining the rooms and history of what went on there, I think it is worth visiting. If you use your imagination and realize that this is where one of the most prominent figures in history that had so much influence over the world killed himself, it's pretty mind-blowing.

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    Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp (Oranienburg)

    by der_geograf Updated Dec 13, 2003

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    Sachsenhausen concentration camp, Oranienburg

    Sachsenhausen was the earliest concentration camp constructed during the Third Reich and it is in Oranienburg, north of Berlin. It was a prototype for later more notorious camps such as Auschwitz, and was later used by the Soviet Union as a prison camp. It is a truly powerful and moving experience to walk the grounds, and there are handheld listening devices that can be purchased at the entrance booth to guide you along. Two museums detailing the site's history, original barracks, the original entry gate and watchtowers are also there. There is a small historical marker along the route to the camp dedicated in memory of the April 1945 "Todesmarsch."

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    Empty Bookshelves: Here the Books Were Burnt

    by iblatt Written Oct 14, 2008

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    The empty bookshelves: Bebelplatz, Berlin
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    Berlin has a quiet but eloquent way of commemorating the terrible events perpetrated by the Nazis during the Third Reich.
    Over 20,000 books were burnt on May 10, 1933, according to the command of Goebels, the Nazi Propaganda Minister. These were books written by Jewish authors, by communists and by other opponents of the Nazi regime. This event took place on what used to be Opera Square, now Bebel Platz on the Unter den Linden boulevard.
    Heinrich Heine, one of the Jewish writers whose books were burnt, said a century earlier: "Where books are burned, in the end people will burn".

    The monument commemorating the burning of the books consists of white, empty bookshelves under the square stone surface, covered by a transparent ceiling.
    It was conceived by the Israeli Micha Ulman in 1995.
    It is both simple and powerful.

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    Topography of Terror

    by Mandy23 Updated Aug 13, 2005

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    Its an exhibition initiated by the Topography Of Terror Foundation and provides historical information about National Socialism and its crimes and wants to hhm kind of initiate active confrontation with this history and its impact since 1945.
    Its currently an open air exhibition that you'll find near the Martin-Gropius Building. Its placed along the excavations in the Niederkirchnerstrasse. Behind this exhibition or its projects is still a remaining section of the wall.

    They've also a little office where you can buy books, leaflets, catalogues etc and you can also get an audio tour in English/German. That means a little device with headphones, to wear while walking along the exhibition. On some of the exhibition "objects" you will find numbers that you enter on this audio device and then you will get a variety of information about the things you see there.

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