Holocaust Memorial, Berlin

4.5 out of 5 stars 68 Reviews

Cora-Berliner-Straße 1, 10117 Berlin +49 (0)30 / 200 766 - 0

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  • elpariente's Profile Photo

    Memorial del Holocausto/ Holocaust memorial

    by elpariente Written Mar 4, 2010

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    Al lado de la Puerta de Brandemburgo, como un ondulado mar de miles (2711) de columnas de hormigón se despliega el llamado 'Monumento a los Judíos asesinados en Europa'
    El arquitecto judío estadounidense Peter Eisenman decidió que los bloques de hormigón se hicieran con un material especial que los protegía de las pintadas , pero se enteró de que la única compañía en el mundo que tenía este material era la que fabricó el gas Zyklon B, usado en las cámaras de gases para el extermino de los judíos.
    Estaba a punto de renunciar a su proyecto , cuando comentando esto con su dentista , este le dijo que si dejaba su proyecto porque esa compañía había colaborado con los Nazis tendría que cambiarle y quitarle todos los arreglos que le había hecho en su boca , pues todas las compañías que fabricaban los materiales habían colaborado con ellos también

    Next to the Brandenburg Gate, like an undulating sea of thousands (2711) of concrete columns is displayed the called "Monument to the Murdered Jews of Europe '
    The American Jewish architect Peter Eisenman decided that the concrete blocks were made with a special material that protected them from the graffiti, but learned that the only company in the world to have this material was that which produced the Zyklon B gas, used in the gas chambers for the extermination of the Jews.
    He was about to give up his project, when discussing this with his dentist, he was told that if he left his project because the company had collaborated with the Nazis , he would have to change, and remove all the arrangements he had made in his mouth, because all companies that manufactured the materials had collaborated with them also.

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    Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe

    by illumina Written Aug 11, 2009

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    In 1988 a proposal was made for establishing a 'highly visible memorial for the murdered Jews of Europe' in Berlin; in 1999 after long debates the German Bundestag passed the resolution to build the Memorial, based on the design by a New York architect, Peter Eisenman. It was opened to the public in 2005. The Holocaust Memorial comprises 2,711 concrete stelae and a subterranean information centre; it honours the up to six million Jewish victims from throughout Europe.

    It's quite an eerie place to wander around, especially in the snow, and I found that the stelae reminded me very strongly of tombs, which I imagine was the architect's purpose. The ground level changes, so that while from the outside the tops of the stelae give the impression of being all more or less the same height, they vary considerably as the paths dip down towards the centre. Once you are several metres in, it becomes a real labyrinth as the blocks rise around you. I rarely like modern sculpture, but I found this place both fascinating and moving.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    The memorial

    by lina112 Written Jul 22, 2009

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    The monument was inaugurated on May 10, 2005. This a great maze of concrete columns in 2711, aims to bring tourists to the horror experienced by the Jewish community during the Holocaust.

    Located between the Brandenburg Gate and the Potsdam Square, near the Reichskanzlei of Adolf Hitler. The field of 19,000 square meters and 2711 blocks of concrete, is intended not only to remember the six million Jewish victims of Nazi horror, but "a place of hope for the future," as stated by the architect Peter Eisenman.

    El monumento se inauguró el 10 de mayo de 2005. Es un gran laberinto de 2711 comumnas de hormigón que pretende acercar al turista al horror vivido por la comunidad judía durante el Holocausto.

    Localizado, entre la Puerta de Brandeburgo y la plaza de Potsdam, cerca de donde estaba la macabra Reichskanzlei de Adolf Hitler. El terreno de 19.000 metros cuadrados con 2711 bloques de hormigón pretende, no sólo recordar a los seis millones de víctimas judías del horror nazi, sino “ser un lugar de esperanza para el futuro”, como declaró su arquitecto Peter Eisenman.

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  • kmohandas's Profile Photo

    Memmorial To The Murdered Jews Of Europe

    by kmohandas Updated Apr 10, 2009

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    Stiftung Denkmal Fur Die Ermordeten Juden Europas (Memmorial To The Murdered Jews Of Europe) consists of 2711 grave stones which are like huge columns. The archtect of this monument is Peter Eisenman.
    If you visit this memmorial, you get a feeling of anger and despair and feel mentally disturbed. You might get lost between the concrete blocks.The architect has deliberately designed the memmorial in to invoke such feelings, so that you remember the victims of holocaust.

    Memmorial For Real Martyers Of WW-II
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  • alancollins's Profile Photo

    Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe

    by alancollins Updated Jan 27, 2009

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    When I last visited Berlin in May 2003 the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe was just a building site with an observation and information area. It would another 2 years before the monument was complete and open to the public. The monument is unusual with a field of 2,711 different sized concrete stelae, arranged in undulating rows and at slightly different angles. The Memorial is open to the public from all four sides and 24/7. As far as I’m aware the site has no connection with the Holocaust but it has a strange eerie silence with its strange grey stones and long shadows in the late autumn sunlight. There is an underground information and exhibition centre in the south east corner of the memorial. Though you have to wait to be admitted and pass through the security checks the information centre is well worth a visit

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  • iblatt's Profile Photo

    To Remember and Never Forget!

    by iblatt Written Oct 22, 2008

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    Over 2,700 concrete stelae are laid in a grid pattern over an area of 19,073 square meters. A huge "field of stelae". I walk up and down the aisles between the long rows of stelae. When the path slopes down the concrete slabs rise high above me. When it climbs gently up I get a view of the whole field and its surroundings.
    It lies in a very central area of Berlin, very close to the Brandenburg Gate, Bundestag and government district, near embassies and official buildings. Just across the road is the Tiergarten park. The memorial is telling every visitor and passer by that history cannot be ignored, it is there to stay; that the mass murders perpetrated by the Nazis should be remembered, and the lesson should be learned, by everyone.

    Stairs lead to the underground information center. The Holocaust with its inconceivable numbers of victims receives human proportions with the accounts of individual communities, families, persons.

    During my visit to the memorial numerous tour buses stopped there, and I saw tourists from all over the world walk among the stelae, reflect, visit the information center.
    I was thinking: this is the best assurance that events like the Holocaust will never happen again, anywhere on our planet.

    Memorial to the murdered Jews of Europe, Berlin Memorial to the murdered Jews of Europe, Berlin
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  • piglet44's Profile Photo

    very moving

    by piglet44 Written Jul 26, 2008

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    This monument, right next to the Brandenburg Gate is a moving and chilling reminder of the tragedies of the Twentieth Century. The huge granite slabs are arranged in such a way as to create a labyrinth which disorientates you as you walk around and casts dark shadows in between the walls.You can really feel like you are lost inside a dark, threatening forest.
    Below it is a really informative and well laid out exhibition,which gives background to the Holocaust and also traces the specific histories of a few families from different European countries, and tells what happened to the different members of each family. There are even postcards and letters sent from inside the camps to families outside, which make it quite clear what was going on inside.
    Well worth a visit even if you find it hard to go round the whole place, at least see some of it.

    the monument
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  • darkjedi's Profile Photo

    Block City

    by darkjedi Written Jun 7, 2008

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    Standing on a 19,000 sq m patch of land sandwiched between the East and West Berlin of the Cold War, the new memorial is an undulating labyrinth of concrete plinths. It consists of a site covered with 2,711 concrete slabs or "stelae", arranged in a grid pattern on a sloping field. Visitors can move through the tilting featureless stones - each one a unique shape and size - from any direction. There are no plaques, inscriptions or symbols along the way.

    This is certainly the largest memorial of any kind I have seen. Wandering in its depths as the sun setted, the noise of the city was completely muted and at the end of the rows seemed so far away and unreachable. Only a momentary glimpse of someone passing across a line of sight before vanishing again in silence.

    According to designer Peter Eisenman's project text, the stelae are designed to produce an uneasy, confusing atmosphere, and the whole sculpture aims to represent a supposedly ordered system that has lost touch with human reason.

    An attached underground 'Place of Information' holds the names of all known Jewish Holocaust victims.

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  • wanderingbilly's Profile Photo

    SPEAKS FOR ITSELF

    by wanderingbilly Updated May 29, 2008

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    AFTER A LOT OF PLANNING AND TALKING THE HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL OPENED TO THE PUBLIC ON 8TH MAY 2005.
    BUILT TO HONOUR THE JEWISH VICTIMS OF NAZI GENOCIDE IT WAS DESIGNED BY ARCHITECT PETER EISENMAN.. THIS MEMORIAL COVERS A 4.7 ACRE SITE AND COST SOME $25 MILLION.. THE WHOLE THING CONSISTS OF 2,711 CONCRETE SLABS..SOME ARE ANKLE HIGH AND SOME TOWER ABOVE YOU..
    THE WHOLE MEMORIAL IS DESIGNED TO PRODUCE AN UNEASY AND CONFUSING ATMOSPHERE..
    I CAN SAFELY SAY MR EISENMAN GOT WHAT HE PLANNED.
    THERE IS NO RIGHT WAY OR WRONG WAY TO WALK AROUND THE MEMORIAL..YOU JUST WALK WHERE YOU PLEASE..ONLY STOPPING TO LOOK AND THINK..YOU WILL DO A LOT OF THINKING HERE...PLUS YOU MAY GET LOST HERE....MOSTLY IN THOUGHT !!
    THE INFORMATION CENTRE IS OPEN FROM10AM TO 8PM
    ADMISSION IS FREE.
    TOURS ARE AT 10.30AM AND 2PM SAT & SUN AND COST $3

    HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL
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  • Greggor58's Profile Photo

    See it For Yourself.....

    by Greggor58 Updated Apr 11, 2008

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    This controversial Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe...is a 19,000 square- meter area covered with 2711 stones placed on sloping, uneven ground in an undulating wave-like design.

    The Memorial is somewhat "modern" in nature...and was designed by architect Peter Eisenman and was dedicated on January 27, 2000. The opening ceremony actually occurred May 10, 2005.

    There is lots of information written about this Memorial...and so I wont go into more detail here.

    I think it is a little unusual way to represent the intended meaning behind this important idea!

    Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe,Berlin. Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe,Berlin. Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe,Berlin.

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  • Glbtrotter's Profile Photo

    Holocaust victims

    by Glbtrotter Written Apr 4, 2008

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    The 19,000 square-meter Memorial for the murdered Jews of Europe, which was opened to the public on May 12, 2005, consists of 2711 stones placed on sloping, uneven ground in an undulating wave-like pattern, giving visitors the feeling of insecurity as though the stones were on unstable ground.
    Visitors can enter from all four sides, day or night, and wander on their own through the maze of stones, as though visiting a graveyard with nameless tombstones. The columns are sunk into the ground to various depths and at some places, they are higher than the heads of the visitors. There are no set paths or sign posts to guide viewers
    To make this a fair game we're only missing a memorial to the other victims, such as homosexuals, gypsies and immigrants.

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  • Helga67's Profile Photo

    Holocaust memorial

    by Helga67 Updated Mar 27, 2008

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    The Holocaust Memorial is situated in the city centre, near the Brandenburger Gate. It was designed by Peter Eisenman, a New York architect. There are 2,711 concrete blocks of different heights, structured in a grid pattern and covering nearly 19,000 m2 of gently sloping ground. There is also an underground Information Centre, similarly designed by Eisenman in an equally impressive style, housing an exhibition with background information on the victims and detailing other historical memorial sites.

    Free access.

    Holocaust memorial Holocaust memorial Holocaust memorial Holocaust memorial

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  • azz8206's Profile Photo

    Holocaust Memorial

    by azz8206 Written Dec 4, 2007

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    A visit to the Holocaust Memorial is a must, it costs nothing, only the museum costs some money but not much.
    I recommend taking the time to go into the memorial and take your time in it and really try to get the message that the architect gives. It is a very disorienting experience.
    I also liked the concept of the museum and how it told the survivors stories.

    Are we there yet?
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  • MichaelFalk1969's Profile Photo

    Holocaust Memorial

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Nov 5, 2007

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    Just 300 metres away from the Brandenburg Gate, built by the architect Peter Eisenmann. You can walk right into the monument (just be careful not to bumb into school kids playing hide and seek there). The remembrance monument is made from a few hundred steles of different size and height.

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  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    Perfect Reflection of this sombre Part of History

    by Kakapo2 Written Oct 31, 2007

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    There was a lot of controversy about this memorial for Europe’s murdered Jews, located just some steps from Brandenburger Tor, towards Potsdamer Platz, at the corner of Ebert- and Behrenstraße, and opened on 10 May 2005. Some people were just sick of getting another such memorial, as there are plenty in Germany, others thought it is the ugliest memorial they have ever seen, and again others were against such a huge area being occupied by a monument.

    So I was rather interested to see it with my own eyes and make up my opinion.

    Well, I was rather impressed. I think those 2711 rectangular grey concrete columns of different heights, lined up on a slightly wave-shaped area of 19,000 square metres, reflect perfectly the sombre feeling that lies over this part of history.

    You can access the paths between the columns from any point around the site, and wherever you are, it always looks different. While you walk along the tracks and lose the feeling of where exactly you are, your thoughts go back to the past. Looking over the columns from the outside you see the tree-lined horizon, and some attractive buildings of Berlin. The other world, the better world that was so close and even visible but yet out of reach for the Jews in the Third Reich. In that sense the monument is a fabulous place to reflect this tragedy, with its monotony and sadness.

    One thing, I think, the American artist and architect Peter Eisenmann had not planned is that some steles would sink and start leaning.

    There is a subterranean documentation centre – called Ort der Information (information site) at the side of Cora-Berliner-Straße. We did not visit because it opened at 10am and we were there earlier, and apart from that we have visited enough such documentation centres and concentration camps to be well informed.

    Documentation centre open Tue – Sun 10am – 8pm (April – September), and from October to March from 10am to 7pm, entry free.

    Guided tours (3 Euro) Sat 11am and 2pm, Sun 11am, 2pm and 4pm.

    Loneliness, monotony, sadness. Dead concrete blocks and green Tiergarten scenery. The Memorial and Potsdamer Platz skyscrapers.
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