Potsdamer Platz, Berlin

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Potsdamer Platz, Berlin-Tiergarten

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Potsdamer square

    by Raimix Updated Oct 7, 2013

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    Potsdamer square is like a symbol of Berlin modernity. Here you can see a few skyscrapers, among them - famous Sony center. the name of Potsdamer square comes from a road, that lead to historical town of Potsdam a few hundred years ago.

    During Second World War it was hardly damaged, so almost everything you see now - is modern. anyway, some architecture saves peaces of old style incorporated.

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  • shavy's Profile Photo

    Potsdamer Platz

    by shavy Written Sep 3, 2013
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    A busy intersection located on the site once occupied by the Wall. The wall was in fact built right on the Potsdamer Platz.. Potsdamer Platz has a turbulent history before World War II it was a lively square, after the war was totally in ruins
    And so, when in 1961, the Wall built right on the square. After the fall of the Wall in 1989, Potsdamer Platz was the largest construction site in Europe
    Today there are many new and modern buildings. Examples include DaimlerChrysler Quartier, the Sony Center and Bahn Tower
    In the last building you will find the headquarters of the (Deutsche Bahn), the German railways

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Potsdamer Platz

    by antistar Updated Jun 8, 2013

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    Potsdamer Platz's Glory Days

    "Once the busiest traffic centres in all of Europe, the square was divided in two by the Berlin Wall, and subsequently became a ghost of its former self. In front of the main U-Bahn station we saw one of the few remnants of the wall, a tiny upright graffiti daubed slab, which groups of tourists huddled around for photographs." - from my travelogue

    Like much of what was great in Berlin, the once lively Potsdamer Platz was left in ruins by allied bombing in 1943. After the war it was split by the Berlin wall, and never quite regained its prominence until German re-unification in 1989. The area then became the scene of the biggest construction work in Europe, and during the 90s many of the great buildings that can be seen there today, like the awesome Sony Center, were built. The area now is again thriving, under a skyline of glass and neon that sets it apart from much of the rest of Berlin.

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    Sony Centar

    by croisbeauty Updated Jun 1, 2013

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    I visited Potsdamerplatz during night only and it was fascinating experience. The whole area is perfectly illuminated in a way to highlight the most attractive buildings and the square entirely.
    Central place in the square is occupied by Sony Center building which is designed and illuminated in a way that awakenes the imagination. The vault of the building, I suppose, every viewer sees in his own way. To me personally it resembles the torn sail ship that is struggling with stormy weather. The color changes of lighting only reinforces that impression, at one point it was a lighting stike and in another giant wave that threatens ship.

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  • slothtraveller's Profile Photo

    Modern hub in Berlin

    by slothtraveller Written Nov 2, 2012

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    Potsdamer Platz has been the centre of lots of regeneration over the post-war period, Today it is a thriving transport hub and home to many modern high rise buildings. It is also home to the popular Sony Center with its huge Sony store as well as the Potsdamer Platz Arkaden, a very shiny and modern shopping centre where you can spend money like it is going out of fashion. I didn't loiter in Potsdamer Platz for long- it was a bit too busy and bustling for my liking. I did however take a look at the Berlin Wall exhibits in the square, showing some of the slabs of the wall itself. Unfortunately most of them were covered in chewing gum- quite disgusting!
    Potsdamer Platz is served by U-Bahn and has a large S-Bahn station too.

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  • Twan's Profile Photo

    Potsdamer Platz

    by Twan Updated Jul 30, 2012

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    The Potsdamer Platz is one of the most famous squares in the center of Berlin and also an important traffic hub. The square is named after the nearby city of Potsdam. Before World War II was a lively square, but after the war consisted of a big mess. In 1961 the Berlin Wall built across the square. An interesting detail is that until 1989 just north of Potsdamer Platz a piece East Berlin territory west of the Wall was, namely the Lenne Dreieck. This triangular piece of land between Ebert Strasse, the Lennestraße and Bellevue Road, belonged to East Berlin, but was the east enclosed by the Wall in the shortest possible route from Potsdamer Platz to the Brandenburg Gate followed, namely through the Ebert Straße.

    After the demolition of the Berlin Wall in 1989 was the largest construction site in Europe. There were many new buildings put down on the empty space that had arisen. Examples of this are as follows:

    the DaimlerChrysler Quartier;
    the Sony-Center;
    the Bahn Tower, where the headquarters of Deutsche Bahn is located;
    the Beisheim Center.

    In 1990, shortly after the fall of the wall, was still on the sandy plain a rock concert performed by Roger Waters: The Wall.

    The square is known for its many theaters, movie houses and theaters. There are other two IMAX cinemas located in the largest cinema in Germany, where films can be viewed in 3D.

    Under the square is the station Potsdamer Platz, which through the Tiergarten Tunnel on the railway network is connected. Since May 28, 2006 regional trains stop there, before that it was only an S-Bahn. The square is also reachable by underground (line U2) and several bus lines.

    The former course of the Berlin Wall, in some places with stones in the road below.

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  • Nikolay_Ivanov's Profile Photo

    Modern and classy

    by Nikolay_Ivanov Written Jul 19, 2012
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    At Potsdamer platz are located the tallest buildings in Berlin (except the TV-tower).There are: Sony-centre, The Deutsche bahn offices, hotel Ritz, Kaisersaal, as well as the hall where the Berlin movie festival takes place every year.

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  • alancollins's Profile Photo

    The Sony Centre

    by alancollins Updated May 26, 2012

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    Potsdamer Platz has always been one of Berlins’ important areas and meeting places. The area was laid waste during WW2 and it remained that way because the Berlin War ran across it. After reunification it was redeveloped and became the largest building site in Europe. One of the buildings is the Sony Centre which was completed in 2000 and is considered to be one of the most accomplished pieces of modern architecture in Berlin. The Sony Centre has become a place to meet and sit under its unusual roof. The only problem with the unusual roof is, its not rain proof so you have to pick your spot when its raining.

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  • Twan's Profile Photo

    Potsdamer Platz

    by Twan Updated Mar 15, 2012

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    Potsdamer Platz
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    The Potsdamer Platz is one of the most famous squares in the center of Berlin and also an important traffic hub. The square is named after the nearby city of Potsdam. Before World War II was a lively square, but after the war consisted of a big mess. In 1961 the Berlin Wall built across the square. An interesting detail is that until 1989 just north of Potsdamer Platz a piece East Berlin territory west of the Wall was, namely the Lenne Dreieck. This triangular piece of land between Ebert Strasse, the Lennestraße and Bellevue Road, belonged to East Berlin, but was the east enclosed by the Wall in the shortest possible route from Potsdamer Platz to the Brandenburg Gate followed, namely through the Ebert Straße.

    After the demolition of the Berlin Wall in 1989 was the largest construction site in Europe. There were many new buildings put down on the empty space that had arisen. Examples of this are as follows:

    the DaimlerChrysler Quartier;
    the Sony-Center;
    the Bahn Tower, where the headquarters of Deutsche Bahn is located;
    the Beisheim Center.

    In 1990, shortly after the fall of the wall, was still on the sandy plain a rock concert performed by Roger Waters: The Wall.

    The square is known for its many theaters, movie houses and theaters. There are other two IMAX cinemas located in the largest cinema in Germany, where films can be viewed in 3D.

    Under the square is the station Potsdamer Platz, which through the Tiergarten Tunnel on the railway network is connected. Since May 28, 2006 regional trains stop there, before that it was only an S-Bahn. The square is also reachable by underground (line U2) and several bus lines.

    The former course of the Berlin Wall, in some places with stones in the road below.

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  • alancollins's Profile Photo

    Cinema with films in English

    by alancollins Updated Nov 27, 2011

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    Cinema
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    When I go away on holiday I enjoy a visit to the cinema to catch up on the latest films. It’s a good place to give your feet a rest after a hard days walking and the prices tend to lower than the UK. The problem being that some countries such as Germany dub the films into German. So it was good news to find this cinema that plays films in their original language at such a tourist location as Potsdamer Platz. The cheapest day is on a Tuesday when it costs about 6 euros to watch a film. I have discovered recentlo that it costs more to sit at the back than closer to the front where the seats are cheaper. The price go up a lot more towards the weekend.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Panorama Punkt

    by toonsarah Written Jun 17, 2011

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    View of Brandenburg Gate from Panorama Punkt
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    One of several skyscrapers at the Potsdamer Platz is the Kollhoff-Tower. A modest (by New York standards) 25 storeys it is nevertheless a striking building due to the way it tapers to a sharp triangular point, to suit the shape of its plot. It has a restaurant and other public buildings on the ground floor, and offices above, but the main reason to visit is the Panorama Punkt, the name given to the public viewing terraces on the 24th and 25th floors. I saw a brief mention of these in our Lonely Planet “Berlin Encounter” book (“the best bird’s eye view in Berlin”) and we decided it sounded worth checking out – and so it proved to be.

    There is a charge to go up (in May 2011 €5.50) and in my view it is well worth it. You will be whisked up to the 24th floor in what it is claimed is the fastest lift in Europe, moving at a dizzying 8.4 metres per second. There you can enjoy some great views over the city and also see the exhibition "Views of Berlin" which lines the inner wall of the viewing terrace and which, despite its all-encompassing name, tells the story of the Potsdamer Platz below:
    ” No other city square in the world has undergone as many transformations as Potsdamer Platz: from a quiet green to the pulsing heart of a major city, from the height of luxury to a field of rubble, from a no man’s land to the new heart of Berlin.”

    But we found even better views, and fewer people, by climbing the steps to the 25th floor terrace above. Here you can walk around all three sides of the triangle, giving you a 360 degree panorama over the city. You can pick out famous landmarks such as the Reichstag, Brandenburg Gate, Tiergarten, Siegesaule (Victory Column), Television Tower, Rotes Rathaus and many more. And when you have had your fill of spotting and photographing the sights you can have a drink and maybe a bite to eat in the rather stylish café back on the 24th floor (see my separate Restaurant tip).

    Opening hours are 10.00 am to 8.00 pm, with last entry at 7:30 pm. The café is open from 11.00 am to 7.00 pm. Weather permitting, the terrace remains open until sunset in summer. If, no when, I go back to Berlin I will definitely go up the Panorama Punkt again, but I think will do so late in the day or early evening, as it must be a wonderful place in which to enjoy a cocktail and watch the sun go down over the city.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    A former wasteland

    by toonsarah Updated Jun 17, 2011

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    Potsdamer Platz architecture
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    Of all the places in Berlin that has changed since the Wall came down, none has changed more than Potsdamer Platz. The former wasteland in the heart of the city is now a major traffic intersection and the site of Berlin’s most eye-catching skyscrapers. The contrast for us from our previous visit here was tremendous. But of course Potsdamer Platz wasn’t always a wasteland – far from it. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, when Berlin was one of the liveliest capitals in Europe, this was one of its liveliest quarters. But with the advent first of National Socialist rule, and then of war, the parties came to an abrupt end. Potsdamer Platz fell silent, and then, like much of the city, was reduced largely to rubble by the onslaught of Allied bombing raids. By the end of the war, only a handful of buildings remained. But whereas elsewhere in the city post-war reconstruction started to fill in the gaps left by bombs, Potsdamer Platz was left – because it had the misfortune to lie directly on the border between British, US and Soviet sectors. The line between them was marked first in the asphalt (in 1948) and then, in 1961, the Wall was driven through the heart of the city, and through the heart of Potsdamer Platz. At no other point on the Berlin Wall was there a wider death strip than here, and all buildings within the strip had to disappear. Furthermore, on the western side, the Berlin government purchased and destroyed unused ruins as they were considered dangerous, and not worth rebuilding so close to the Wall. This is the waste-landscape that we saw on our first visit, in 1985. Have a look at the postcard from that time which I have scanned as photo 3.

    In 1989 the square became the focus of world attention. Only three days after the fall of the Wall, a section here was removed, a stretch of road asphalted and a border crossing installed – traffic was moving again on Potsdamer Platz. A few months later Roger Waters organised a concert in the no-man's-land between Potsdamer Platz and Pariser Platz (in front of the Brandenburg Gate). It was the largest concert in the history of rock music.

    And with reunification came new life for Potsdamer Platz, its very emptiness becoming its strength, as it offered a blank canvas for the newly unified city planners. Soon this was the largest construction site in Europe, building “a city for the 21st century”.

    Today, with businesses, tourist draws, bars, restaurants, hotels and shopping, it is once again the lively urban hub that it was 100 years ago, albeit in a very modern style. Attractions include the Panorama Punkt viewing point (see my separate tip), a nineteen screen cinema (the CinemaxX), Legoland, a casino, several nightclubs, and the Daimler 20th century art collection (www.sammlung.daimler.com). Of these we only visited the Panorama Punkt, which was fantastic, but even if you’re not especially interested in any of them you should still put Potsdamer Platz on your Berlin itinerary, in my opinion. You won’t find a public square in the usual sense of the word, but rather a series of connected public spaces clustered around the thoroughfare of Potsdamer Straße. The area buzzes with activity – buskers (this is where we first encountered the lively Rupert’s Kitchen Orchestra whom we were to see again the next day in the Mauerpark), tourists taking photos, local workers hurrying (or trying to hurry) through the crowds to get to meetings ... It’s a great place for people watching!

    And as everywhere in this city, even here in its most modern manifestation, the past is with us. Look carefully and you will see the line of the Wall carefully recorded on the ground in a double row of darker stones (see photo in my Local Customs tip about the Wall). And there are actual fragments of the Wall too, which act as supports for a series of information boards about the history of the area (photo 4). Past, as so often in Berlin, meets present ...

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    Visit The Sony Centre At Night

    by AnnS Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Postdamer Platz and The Sony Centre is a great place to visit if you like modern architecture. I visited in the evening when the huge glass buildings were all illuminated and it was wonderful.

    Just inside the entrance to the Sony Centre is the Kaisersaal, which was once part of the nearby Grand Hotel Esplanade, a luxury hotel which was almost destroyed in World War II. What remained was carefully moved to its current position and is now preserved behind a glass screen.

    Once inside the central Piazza, the most stunning part is the ornate glass roof which is lit with colours and looks truly spectacular. The Piazza is lined with restaurants, shops, Sony offices and a multiplex cinema and in the centre is a pool and fountain. Walk through to the back of the centre to see more impressive glass buildings.

    Outside the Centre, and just across the road is the Potsdamer Platz Arkaden, which is a large shopping mall.

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    Potsdamer Platz

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Potsdamer Platz is located about 1km south from the Brandenburg Gate. In the 1920s & 30s it was a very busy traffic centre and in fact in 1924 it was home to Europe's first (hand-operated) traffic light.

    After World War II it became a desolate wasteland, dissected by the Berlin Wall. In the 1990's it became the largest construction zone in Europe, with mass development creating a 'mini-city' with the city.

    These days it is the heart of the new metropolis of Berlin, attracting tourists and Berliners to its shops, cinemas and restaurants, along with its stunning modern architecture.

    The most interesting building is the Sony Centre, the headquarters of Sony Europe. It consists of several buildings surrounding an inner courtyard which is covered with a steel and glass dome-like structure.

    Potsdamer Platz is also home to the European headquarters of DaimlerChrysler, the famous car manufacturer. Also in the area is Berlin's casino and the city's largest show stage.

    We had a wander around this area, marvelling at the fabulous architecture.

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  • Roadquill's Profile Photo

    Modern Architecture of Potsdamer Platz

    by Roadquill Written Feb 6, 2011

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    Rising from the ashes of World War 2, the contemporary design and driving heartbeat of the metropolis of Potsdamer Platz is a fun and interesting place to visit. Boutiques, the Berlin Filmmuseum, Sony Center, a Cinemaxx and casino. Plus and stunning glass overstructure.

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