Potsdamer Platz, Berlin

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    A former wasteland

    by toonsarah Updated Jun 17, 2011

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    Of all the places in Berlin that has changed since the Wall came down, none has changed more than Potsdamer Platz. The former wasteland in the heart of the city is now a major traffic intersection and the site of Berlin’s most eye-catching skyscrapers. The contrast for us from our previous visit here was tremendous. But of course Potsdamer Platz wasn’t always a wasteland – far from it. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, when Berlin was one of the liveliest capitals in Europe, this was one of its liveliest quarters. But with the advent first of National Socialist rule, and then of war, the parties came to an abrupt end. Potsdamer Platz fell silent, and then, like much of the city, was reduced largely to rubble by the onslaught of Allied bombing raids. By the end of the war, only a handful of buildings remained. But whereas elsewhere in the city post-war reconstruction started to fill in the gaps left by bombs, Potsdamer Platz was left – because it had the misfortune to lie directly on the border between British, US and Soviet sectors. The line between them was marked first in the asphalt (in 1948) and then, in 1961, the Wall was driven through the heart of the city, and through the heart of Potsdamer Platz. At no other point on the Berlin Wall was there a wider death strip than here, and all buildings within the strip had to disappear. Furthermore, on the western side, the Berlin government purchased and destroyed unused ruins as they were considered dangerous, and not worth rebuilding so close to the Wall. This is the waste-landscape that we saw on our first visit, in 1985. Have a look at the postcard from that time which I have scanned as photo 3.

    In 1989 the square became the focus of world attention. Only three days after the fall of the Wall, a section here was removed, a stretch of road asphalted and a border crossing installed – traffic was moving again on Potsdamer Platz. A few months later Roger Waters organised a concert in the no-man's-land between Potsdamer Platz and Pariser Platz (in front of the Brandenburg Gate). It was the largest concert in the history of rock music.

    And with reunification came new life for Potsdamer Platz, its very emptiness becoming its strength, as it offered a blank canvas for the newly unified city planners. Soon this was the largest construction site in Europe, building “a city for the 21st century”.

    Today, with businesses, tourist draws, bars, restaurants, hotels and shopping, it is once again the lively urban hub that it was 100 years ago, albeit in a very modern style. Attractions include the Panorama Punkt viewing point (see my separate tip), a nineteen screen cinema (the CinemaxX), Legoland, a casino, several nightclubs, and the Daimler 20th century art collection (www.sammlung.daimler.com). Of these we only visited the Panorama Punkt, which was fantastic, but even if you’re not especially interested in any of them you should still put Potsdamer Platz on your Berlin itinerary, in my opinion. You won’t find a public square in the usual sense of the word, but rather a series of connected public spaces clustered around the thoroughfare of Potsdamer Straße. The area buzzes with activity – buskers (this is where we first encountered the lively Rupert’s Kitchen Orchestra whom we were to see again the next day in the Mauerpark), tourists taking photos, local workers hurrying (or trying to hurry) through the crowds to get to meetings ... It’s a great place for people watching!

    And as everywhere in this city, even here in its most modern manifestation, the past is with us. Look carefully and you will see the line of the Wall carefully recorded on the ground in a double row of darker stones (see photo in my Local Customs tip about the Wall). And there are actual fragments of the Wall too, which act as supports for a series of information boards about the history of the area (photo 4). Past, as so often in Berlin, meets present ...

    Potsdamer Platz architecture Potsdamer Platz architecture Postcard of Potsdamer Platz divided Tourists at Potsdamer Platz Potsdamer Platz from above
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    Panorama Punkt

    by toonsarah Written Jun 17, 2011

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    One of several skyscrapers at the Potsdamer Platz is the Kollhoff-Tower. A modest (by New York standards) 25 storeys it is nevertheless a striking building due to the way it tapers to a sharp triangular point, to suit the shape of its plot. It has a restaurant and other public buildings on the ground floor, and offices above, but the main reason to visit is the Panorama Punkt, the name given to the public viewing terraces on the 24th and 25th floors. I saw a brief mention of these in our Lonely Planet “Berlin Encounter” book (“the best bird’s eye view in Berlin”) and we decided it sounded worth checking out – and so it proved to be.

    There is a charge to go up (in May 2011 €5.50) and in my view it is well worth it. You will be whisked up to the 24th floor in what it is claimed is the fastest lift in Europe, moving at a dizzying 8.4 metres per second. There you can enjoy some great views over the city and also see the exhibition "Views of Berlin" which lines the inner wall of the viewing terrace and which, despite its all-encompassing name, tells the story of the Potsdamer Platz below:
    ” No other city square in the world has undergone as many transformations as Potsdamer Platz: from a quiet green to the pulsing heart of a major city, from the height of luxury to a field of rubble, from a no man’s land to the new heart of Berlin.”

    But we found even better views, and fewer people, by climbing the steps to the 25th floor terrace above. Here you can walk around all three sides of the triangle, giving you a 360 degree panorama over the city. You can pick out famous landmarks such as the Reichstag, Brandenburg Gate, Tiergarten, Siegesaule (Victory Column), Television Tower, Rotes Rathaus and many more. And when you have had your fill of spotting and photographing the sights you can have a drink and maybe a bite to eat in the rather stylish café back on the 24th floor (see my separate Restaurant tip).

    Opening hours are 10.00 am to 8.00 pm, with last entry at 7:30 pm. The café is open from 11.00 am to 7.00 pm. Weather permitting, the terrace remains open until sunset in summer. If, no when, I go back to Berlin I will definitely go up the Panorama Punkt again, but I think will do so late in the day or early evening, as it must be a wonderful place in which to enjoy a cocktail and watch the sun go down over the city.

    View of Brandenburg Gate from Panorama Punkt Reichstag seen from the Panorama Punkt Siegesaule and Rotes Rathaus beyond South to what was No Man���s Land
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    Potsdamer Platz

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Potsdamer Platz is located about 1km south from the Brandenburg Gate. In the 1920s & 30s it was a very busy traffic centre and in fact in 1924 it was home to Europe's first (hand-operated) traffic light.

    After World War II it became a desolate wasteland, dissected by the Berlin Wall. In the 1990's it became the largest construction zone in Europe, with mass development creating a 'mini-city' with the city.

    These days it is the heart of the new metropolis of Berlin, attracting tourists and Berliners to its shops, cinemas and restaurants, along with its stunning modern architecture.

    The most interesting building is the Sony Centre, the headquarters of Sony Europe. It consists of several buildings surrounding an inner courtyard which is covered with a steel and glass dome-like structure.

    Potsdamer Platz is also home to the European headquarters of DaimlerChrysler, the famous car manufacturer. Also in the area is Berlin's casino and the city's largest show stage.

    We had a wander around this area, marvelling at the fabulous architecture.

    sony centre sony centre sony centre
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    Architectural Masterpieces on the Death Strip

    by Kakapo2 Updated Mar 17, 2008

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    This glimmering and glittering square is the symbol of the new Berlin, and its new centre at the site of an historic centre. It has risen from nothing. Well, not really nothing… The area was occupied by the Wall, so was a kind of no man’s land on the western side and the death strip in the east. Incredible if you think that this square – in fact a whole quarter of about 50 hectares - had been a hub of busy city life, entertainment and culture for more than 200 years before World War II. In 1900 there were 92 restaurants, 10 distilleries, 13 cafés and 36 pubs. It attracted the rich and the famous, and became Europe’s busiest square.

    To fill the after-war and Wall wasteland with life again was a big challenge, and a real prestige project. World-famous enterprises invested incredible amounts of money into innovative buildings since 1995, star-architects created 19 building complexes. The first massive high-rise inaugurated was the DaimlerChrysler complex in 1998. However, the Sony Center with its circus-like marquee has become the most photographed structure in the meantime.

    Berlin’s biggest shopping centre (Arkaden), a multiplex cinema, an IMEX cinema, a musical theatre, the Philharmonie, a casino, hotels, a movie museum, and plenty of cafés and restaurants attract locals and visitors alike. Europe’s fastest lift takes people to the viewing platform of the DaimlerChrysler complex, 93 metres above the ground.

    To me, Potsdamer Platz is an agglomeration of architectural masterpieces, where you admire the art of architecture, technology, and innovation. However, I did not feel the need to stay for a coffee. Ok, I would not have rejected a drink in one of the indoor-outdoor cafés of the Sony Centre but I do not feel the need to spend a lot of time in such ultra-modern atmosphere, with ultra-professional people around me, and hotel staff in tails and with stovepipe hats bowing low in front of their customers, like at the Ritz-Carlton in the art-deco Beisheim Centre. Everything seems a bit far away from real life.

    Daimler complex and Sony Center.
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  • jenniferchin's Profile Photo

    Potsdamer Platz : A HUGE square

    by jenniferchin Written Oct 8, 2004

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    This landmark square in Berlin was one of the most liveliest and busiest in the world. It was a major public transport hub then and the area in the vicinity contained many bars, cafés and cinemas.

    Left alone after the war, completely flattened with the construction of the wall in 1961 when the demolished buildings were pulled down, it was revived in the 1990s and is now several landmark towers, a shopping arcade, an entertainment center and residential buildings

    Amongst the buildings there currently are the Debis tower, the Sony Center and the Kohlhof building.

    Sony Center at night

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    Sony Center

    by bijo69 Updated Aug 3, 2005

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    The Sony Center is one of the recently built complexes in the "new" centre of Berlin. It was officially opened in 2000 and its most prominent feature is its dome.
    The Sony Center host offices, apartments, restaurants, bars, cinemas (Cinestar & Imax), shops and the Berlin Film Museum
    A little warning: the restaurants I tried belong to the category "Tourist Traps": mediocre to poor food and slow service.

    Sony Center Dome
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    Potsdamer Platz

    by antistar Updated Jun 8, 2013

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    "Once the busiest traffic centres in all of Europe, the square was divided in two by the Berlin Wall, and subsequently became a ghost of its former self. In front of the main U-Bahn station we saw one of the few remnants of the wall, a tiny upright graffiti daubed slab, which groups of tourists huddled around for photographs." - from my travelogue

    Like much of what was great in Berlin, the once lively Potsdamer Platz was left in ruins by allied bombing in 1943. After the war it was split by the Berlin wall, and never quite regained its prominence until German re-unification in 1989. The area then became the scene of the biggest construction work in Europe, and during the 90s many of the great buildings that can be seen there today, like the awesome Sony Center, were built. The area now is again thriving, under a skyline of glass and neon that sets it apart from much of the rest of Berlin.

    Potsdamer Platz's Glory Days

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    Sony Center: Welcome to Mt. Fuji!

    by iblatt Updated Dec 10, 2008

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    On Potsdamer Platz you can't miss the impressive Sony Center with its unusual dome.
    The center is composed of 7 buildings made of steel and glass, each one with its own unique shape; a large plaza in their center, with a pool and fountain; and the whole structure is topped above by the spectacular roof / dome, which is made to resemble Mt. Fuji.

    It is snow-white by day, and from dusk until late at night it glows in purple and blue, in a cycle that alternates every 21 seconds. The ilumination was designed to highlight the roof structure of glass, steel and fabric.
    The construction of the Sony Center took place between 1996-2000.

    The place is bustling with life at all times, day and night. There are apartments, shops, restaurants, cafes and also the German Filmhaus with its Film Museum and the IMAX 3D theater (open daily 10:30 AM - 9:30 PM).

    Sony Center Berlin by Night Sony Center Berlin by Night Mt. Fuji in central Berlin!
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  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    Sony Center - the Star of the Square

    by Kakapo2 Updated Oct 31, 2007

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    The Sony Center is the star among the many spectacular buildings around Potsdamer Platz. It stands out from the skyscrapers of different styles, from the art deco-like Beisheim Center which intends to bring a kind of New York atmosphere into Berlin, and the many mirror-like ultra-modern facades of other buildings. Statistics say that the Sony Center attracts about eight million people every year.

    You have to see the Sony Center in its entity. It consists of seven buildings made of glass and steel, and in the centre of it is a square – an oval forum - with a fountain, several cafés, restaurants, and a cinema. This square is under a roof shaped like a circus marquee, and made of fabric attached to a steel ring which sits on top of the surrounding buildings, so people can sit outside even when it rains.

    Helmut Jahn, an architect from the city of Nürnberg living in Chicago, created this spectacular complex which was built from 1996 to 1999 on a triangular area. The highest building, facing Potsdamer Platz, is 103 metres high.

    On photo 2 you see the forum with its fountain, cafés, and restaurants.

    A complex of glass, steel and light. The atrium under the circus-like marquee roof.
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    Many architects – one great Result

    by Kakapo2 Written Oct 31, 2007

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    The genius idea behind the creation of Potsdamer Platz in the 1990’s was to choose one master plan and then make a joint effort to create diversity. Two architects named Renzo Piano and Christoph Kohlbecker won the design competition, and they were joint by five other designer teams. This guaranteed that the square became a homogenous unity but uniformity was avoided.

    The big complexes are situated around Potsdamer Platz. So the square itself is an open space, and the building complexes are worlds of their own, undisturbed by the streets that cut through the square.

    Four main complexes define the square that was dubbed Europe’s biggest building site during the years of construction. One is the famous Sony Center which ends at the new Potsdamer Platz. Next comes the DB Tower which is the site of Deutsche Bahn (German Railways). To its south is the Daimler complex which dominates the whole area with about 70,000 square metres. (They have changed their name twice since the start (first Daimler Benz AG, then DaimlerChrysler, now Daimler AG). They had purchased the whole area from Berlin’s Senate and initiated the creation of this new business and entertainment centre.

    The Daimler complex includes the debis-Haus (now Daimler Financial Services), the 103 metres high Kollhoff Tower, and as the heart the Marlene-Dietrich-Platz with most entertainment and arts centres. The smaller brick buildings of the Beisheim Center complete the project. And further to the south you find the Park-Kolonnaden – but they are already some steps away from the main square, and not many tourists walk around there.

    The original Potsdamer Platz is an octagon – already in “prehistoric” times it was called “Achteck”. It now sits at the site of the former city gate (Potsdamer Tor), right in front of the city wall (not: THE Wall).

    On the square you also find a replica of the historic Verkehrsturm (traffic tower). It was the first traffic light on the square.

    Obviously Daimler and Sony have just offered their centres for sale (Oct. 2007).

    The replica of Berlin's first traffic light. The New Yorkish towers of the Beisheim Center.
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    Modern architecture near the Potsdamer platz

    by Emke Updated Mar 16, 2004

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    Around the Potsdamer Platz you will find this amazing section with nice modern architecture. Look for the really big seesaws ('wip' in Dutch).

    Can anyone tell me how this street or neighbourhoud is called? Please comment on this page!

    Near the Potsdammer platz
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    Sony Center by night

    by Emke Written Mar 1, 2004

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    The Sony center at the Potsdamer Platz by day is nice, but the Sony Center by night is breathtaking!

    Also take a look at the DB-building (Deutsche Bahn, the German railways) and the Chrysler building, so wonderful!

    If you like modern architecture (like me!) this is a paradise!

    Sonycenter by night

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    The miraculous Reflections in the Convex Mirror

    by Kakapo2 Updated Oct 31, 2007

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    Yes, this is a little bit of fun after all the serious information about Potsdamer Platz. My husband and I were walking around on the square, and although we were miles apart we were doing the same thing, as we later found out. We both tried to spot each other in this convex mirror in which passing people appear miraculously, and depending where you stand you see different people in the mirror.

    This photo was taken in the same moment... ... as this one.
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    Potsdamer square

    by Raimix Updated Oct 7, 2013

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    Potsdamer square is like a symbol of Berlin modernity. Here you can see a few skyscrapers, among them - famous Sony center. the name of Potsdamer square comes from a road, that lead to historical town of Potsdam a few hundred years ago.

    During Second World War it was hardly damaged, so almost everything you see now - is modern. anyway, some architecture saves peaces of old style incorporated.

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    Exciting architecture where west and east meet

    by iblatt Written Nov 19, 2008

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    There are those who like the way Potsdamer Platz was developed, and there are those who don't. I definitely belong to the former, what about you? Go and check it out yourself and then write your own tip!

    Potsdamer Platz was developed in the 19th century, and by the 1920s it is said to have been the busiest square in Europe. It was almost completely destroyed during World War II, and was re-developed and rebuilt in the 1990s.
    There was a heated discussion between architects about the style (and height) of the proposed new buildings in this very central square in Berlin, where west and east meet. Those architects who favored ultra-modern, daring high-rise buildings prevailed, and the result is stunning.

    Besides admiring the feats of modern architecture, you can:
    - Take the elevator to the Panoramapunkt viewing platform. and see East and West Berlin from a height of 100m.
    - Look at the symbolic Berlin Wall fragments with their colorful grafitti and read some information about the wall.
    - Fall into a tourist trap and have your passport stamped with an East Berlin stamp by a guy dressed in a DDR uniform.
    - Enter the huge shopping and entertainmemt complex of Sony Center (see my Sony Center tip).
    - Use the Potsdamer Platz as a starting point to tour the many nearby attractions: Brandenburger Tor, Tiergarten, Holocaust Memorial, Reichstag, the Kulturforum, Marlene Dietrich Square with its restaurants and clubs.

    Memories of the Wall in Potsdamer Platz Modern architecture in Potsdamer Platz, Berlin Potsdamer Platz by night Modern architecture in Potsdamer Platz, Berlin
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