Saint Hedwig Cathedral, Berlin

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  • Saint Hedwig Cathedral
    by croisbeauty
  • Sankt Hedwige Kathedral
    Sankt Hedwige Kathedral
    by croisbeauty
  • interiors of St. Hedwige
    interiors of St. Hedwige
    by croisbeauty
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    St. Hedwig's Kathedrale

    by croisbeauty Updated Jan 1, 2012

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    Sankt Hedwige Kathedral
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    Sankt Hedwig's Kathedrale is a Roman catholic church situated on a Babelplatz. It is the seat of archbishop of Berlin. The cathedral was built in the 18th century as the first catholic church in Prussia erected after the Protestant Refomation, and by special permission of King Frederick II. The church was dedicated to the patron of Silesia and Brandenburg, saint Hedwigof Andechs. Berlin at that time had alot of immigrants from Upper Silesia who were catholics.
    The building was designed by Georg Wenzeslaus, modeled after Pantheon in Rome.
    After the Kristallnacht pogroms in 1938 Bernhard Lichtenberg, who was a canon of the cathedral, prayed publicly for Jews and was jailed by the Nazis. Lichtenberg died on the way to the concentration camp at Dachau. Today his remains could be seen in the crypt of the cathedral.

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    St Hedwig's Cathedral

    by illumina Written Nov 18, 2009

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    Situated on Bebelplatz, St Hedwig's Cathedral was built between 1747 and 1773, with the permission of Friedrich II, and was the first Catholic church to be built in Germany after the Protestant Reformation. It was designed by by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff, and it said to be modelled on the Pantheon in Rome. It is the bishop's church of the roman-catholic Archdiocese of Berlin.

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    St Hedwigs Cathedral

    by alancollins Written May 29, 2007

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    St Hedwigs Cathedral

    St Hedwigs Cathedral was opened in 1773 and was built to serve the the Catholics of Silesia following defeat in the Silesian Wars of 1740-63. It is one of four cathedrals in Berlin and this is the only one serving Roman Catholics. The building was destroyed in 1943 during WW2 and was completely rebuilt from 1952 to 1963. The crypt holds the tombs of many bishops of Berlin. It also contains the tomb of Bernhard Lichtenberg, provost of the Cathedral who helped the Jews and died on the way to Dachau Concentration Camp and was later beatified as a martyr by Pope John Paul II.

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    St. Hedwig's Cathedral

    by Gerrem Updated Aug 28, 2005

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    St. Hedwig's Cathedral

    St. Hedwig's Cathedral is the diocesan church of the Archdiocese of Berlin and the most important Roman Catholic ecclesiastical building in the city.
    As a sign of the religious tolerance of Prussia, Friedrich II. gave permission for it to be built, financed by donations from all over Europe. The church, behind the »Staatsoper on »Bebelplatz, was built from 1747–73 to plans by Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff, who drew inspiration from the Pantheon in Rome. Johann Boumann the Elder supervised the construction; the dome, initially executed in wood, and the gable frieze were only completed in 1884–87 because of problems during construction. It has served as the cathedral of the Archdiocese of Berlin since 1929. Under the leadership of the dean Bernhard Lichtenberg, who died in prison and who was beatified in 1996, St. Hedwig's Cathdral became one of the centers of Catholic resistance. Badly damaged in the Second World War, the cathedral was rebuilt from 1952–63 to plans by Hans Schwippert, at which time a new, reinforced concrete dome was added. The interior was also extended and modernized during reconstruction. With its unusual dome and valuable inventory, including a Madonna from the 16th century and the Pietà from 1420, the building is well worth a visit.

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  • St Hedwig's Cathedral

    by KituAdventures Written Jan 8, 2005

    St Hedwig's is Berlin's principle Catholic church, boasting a beautiful sculpted front facade and distinctive copper dome. Outside this cathedral, the infamous Nazi Book Bonfire took place in 1938. Unfortunately, this square and the cathedral have been in perenial state of reconstruction of late.

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    St. Hedwigs-Kathedrale

    by Polly74 Written May 24, 2004

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    St. Hedwigs-Kathedrale

    In 1747 King Friedrich II ceded a free area behind the Opera to the Catholic congregation, which did not yet have its own place of worship in Berlin. In accordance with specifications from the king, Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff designed the central structure in imitation of the Pantheon in Rome. Johann Boumann the Elder took over the execution of these plans in 1747-73. In 1929, St. Hedwig's Church was elevated to a cathedral, the church of the bishopric of Berlin.
    Bombings in March 1943 gutted the cathedral down to the enclosing walls. Its restoration in 1952-63 was planned by the D?sseldorf architect Hans Schwippert. The external architecture was restored to resemble its historical appearance; except for the dome, whose new concrete shell construction gave it a new silhouette. The fa?ade is characterized by a simple plaster ashlar, high, unadorned Romanesque windows and an entablature running around the entire structure. The portico is accentuated architecturally, with its triangular gable supported by six Ionic three-quarter columns.
    When the interior was redecorated after the war, the preserved architectural elements like wall niches, double columns and the dome were renovated in contemporary designs. The most noticeable change was that the crypt was inaugurated as a subterranean church, generously expanding the central space.

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