Butzbach Things to Do

  • All restored in 1985
    All restored in 1985
    by Weissdorn
  • Things to Do
    by Weissdorn
  • Things to Do
    by Weissdorn

Most Recent Things to Do in Butzbach

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    St. Wendelin's Chapel

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    This is the oldest half-timbered church in the State of Hesse (built around 1440 on top of the foundation of an older building, probably dating back to the 13th century). Before the year 1375 the city hospital was located at St. Wendelin's (home for the sick, poor and the old), which was put together out of dozens of old buildings. The chapel, restored in 1987, contains the precious St. Wendelin shrine (painted and carved around 1510). The adjacent building contains the work rooms for several clubs (with the interesting home tuba from the Tepl Highlands, Tepl being the sister city of Butzbach).

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    Former "Frankfurt Court" (Frankfurter Hof)

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Built in 1803 as the first private home outside of the city walls, by Johann Jakob Sarasin, a rich Frankfurt restaurant owner and wine dealer, who opened this building as a guesthouse. Friedrich Ludwig Weidig was held prisoner here in 1833 for seven weeks.

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    Solms Castle

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    An interesting building that was built at the height of the late Gothic stone-building period, in 1481, and served as a royal steward’s headquarters. The building was built directly on the city walls. Later it became the city castle for the Dukes of Solms-Hohensolms-Lich. There still is a wonderful Renaissance stairway, built in 1588. Since 1879 it’s been the county courthouse.

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    Landgrave Castle

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    This was once the city residence of the Lords of Falkenstein (approx. 1321-1418), then it became the home of the House of Eppstein-Königstein, the Archbishop of Mainz, and finally a Hessian Landgrave castle. Landgrave Philipp of Hesse-Butzbach (1609-1643) transformed the partially burnt up castle into an opulent residence, which later became the home of his widow. In 1818 and 1824 it was redesigned to be an army base. The Gothic and Baroque elements of the castle are still intact today. The U.S. Army moved out of the castle in 1990. Now it has been planned to be used by civilians.

    The historical grounds of the Butzbach Landgrave castle have been awakened from their nearly two hundred year Sleeping Beauty sleep, and have been given back to their builders – the people of Butzbach. Now it’s being transformed. What still will remain is the historic buildings, such as the castle dating back to the 14th century, the ball (play) room from the early 17th century, and the stalls from the beginning of the 19th century. In addition, it will receive a few new buildings from this century.

    In other areas, the grounds with their surrounding walls will remain a border for the area. The city of Butzbach is looking for investors, who have good ideas of how to effective use this attractive area, and generally promote life in the city. What’s being changed is the castle park grounds and an attractive living and shopping area for the 9.1 hector area in the center of the city.

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    The Baroque House Weide

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Built in 1725 by the city physics doctor, Dr. Fabricius in Baroque style, a half-timbered house with plastering and numerous plaster figures, and a lovely entry way. This was once the home of Weidig’s student, Christoph Rumpf (1815-1899).

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    The Buff Family House

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    This is an example of the few late Gothic, half stone Patrician homes in the city. Portions of the half-timbered construction were altered in the 18th/19th centuries. This was the ancestral home of the Buff Family, who became famous because of Goethe’s acquaintance, Lotte Buff, who was a key figure in the famous novel by Goethe, "The Misery of the Young Man Werther".

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    St. Michael's Chapel

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    This is the late Gothic former relics (bones) house, with the St. Michael's and St. Catherine's Chapels next to it (built around 1433/35). This is an important stone building with late Gothic frescos (around 1475) of St. Michael. After the reformation, it served as a fire department, a flour weighing house, and a hay storage house, etc. From 1907 through 1991 the home town and typical costume museum was housed here.

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    Inside St. Mark's Church

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Their famous dean, Gabriel Biel (approx. 1410-1495) was the founder and rector of the University of Tübingen and the last great theologist before the reformation. Landgrave Philipp of Hesse-Butzbach built this royal crypt (in 1622) and donated the organ (in 1614) and the pulpit (in 1617). This church harbors many wonderful cultural artifacts.

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    St. Mark's Church

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    This church of today probably emerged from a basilica out of the 13th century, and was rebuilt into a Gothic nave church with three naves and choirs with about the same size, around 1500. The original Gothic bell tower roof top was replaced in 1606 with a Baroque one. The foundation of a Latin School in 1470 was the work of the "the brothers for common life" or the "Ball Brothers".

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    City Walls and the Witch’s Tower on Kirchplatz

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Between 1321-1368 a heavily fortified wall surrounding the newly founded city of Butzbach was erected, as part of the massive construction efforts after the city was granted rights (here with typical Schwib arches. Three city gates and several towers gave the well-fortified city additional security. The Witch’s Tower is one of the last remaining city wall towers (14th century), and was built to serve as a prison and a watchtower. People that were accused of practicing witchcraft were also locked away in this tower until they received their sentences.

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    The Weidig House - The Rectory

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The lovely half-timbered house that has been tastefully restored originates from the 18th century. This is the former rectory of the Latin School. Dr. Friedrich Ludwig Weidig (1791-1837), democrat, freedom fighter and martyr for civil freedoms, lived here from 1824-1826. From 1803-1808, 1813 and 1815 Weidig lived in his parents' house at the forester’s office (Griedeler Street 23); in 1814 in the old city school (Kirchplatz 8) and since his marriage, from 1827-1834, in the house at Langgasse 20 (Butzbach Newspaper). Weidig gained particular fame as the co-author and publisher of the famous revolutionary flyer, called "The Hessian Country Messenger" (in 1834), which was published by Georg Büchner. Weidig founded around 1814 the first Hessian Gymnasium on the banks of the Schrenzer River (near Butzbach).

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    Various Half-Timbered Houses

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    All restored in 1985

    Beautifully restored set of houses (with very interesting roof attachments). Around 1708 House No. 15 was built by the music instrument maker, Johannes Scherer, the father of the Europe-wide famous music instrument maker and lathe artist, Georg Heinrich Scherer (1703-1778). Scherer wind instruments and flutes made of ivory are considered rare treasures in all museums around the world. In 1725 Mr. Scherer purchased the back-lot building for House No. 13 and probably set up shop here. An original Scherer flute can be seen in the Butzbach museum today.

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    Old Guesthouse

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Impressive double house with dormer windows (built in 1709 and 1710), with ornate carvings; the house to the left was built by the farrier Johenrich Jung in 1710, the house to the right was built by Georg Karl Happel; which later became the Guesthouse, "To the Golden Lion" (Zum Goldenen Löwen). The ground floor has been drastically changed since 1923. The "German Singer’s Association" (Deutscher Sängerbund) was founded here in 1860.

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    Inside City Hall

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    City hall is still the location for the city council today (this picture is showing the council chambers). This beautiful building has a stately half-timbered construction with stone supporting brickwork going back to 1559/60. The large dormer window on the gable front and both pointed bow portals in the ground floor hall were unfortunately removed in the 19th century. The massive half-timbered construction was made visible again in 1926 . In the ground floor hallway, there are stone memorials discovered in the city from Roman and medieval times on display (from the museum collection).

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    City Hall & Marketplace

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The Butzbach City Hall is the center of all city life since the town’s foundation in 1321 and similar to the older village that was founded back in 773. The marketplace with it’s fountain, city hall (built in 1559/60) as well as numerous important half-timbered building make this place one of the most beautiful and well-known plazas in the State of Hesse (redesigned in 1986/87) . The marketplace fountain (mentioned in documents dating back to 1435) has fresh flowing water (instead of recycled water like many others in the city). Many of the houses surrounding the plaza are even older than city hall (for example the house at Marktplatz 18 has sections that date back to the 14th century).

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Butzbach Things to Do

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