Frankfurt am Main Shopping

  • A Taste of Britain
    A Taste of Britain
    by Nemorino
  • Shopping
    by mirchica
  • Shopping
    by mirchica

Most Recent Shopping in Frankfurt am Main

  • Joumaky's Profile Photo

    Bären-Treff: Gummy Bears to Chew On

    by Joumaky Written Jun 23, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Where can you find about 100 varieties of gummy bears? Why Bären-Treff of course!
    If you like gummy bears this store is definitely for you and if you think you don't like gummy bears this store will make a believer out of you.
    Don't miss it!

    What to buy: Gummy Bears, Gummy candy, licorice, Gelatin free Bears, Sugar Free Bears, Gift boxes and bags

    What to pay: Average prices: +/- 1 EUR per 100g

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Food and Dining

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    Wacker`s Kaffee: Gourmet Coffee Since 1914

    by Joumaky Written Jun 20, 2013

    A little establishment with big flavours! Wacker`s is both a coffee bar and a retail shop.

    What to buy: Freshly ground coffee, chocolate powder, cake.
    Coffee beans, available in 500 grams bags, include beans from Mexico, Java, India, Nicaragua, Galapagos, Cuba, Brazil, Jamaica, Guatemala and Costa Rica among others.

    What to pay: About average - 4 to 15 EUR

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Women's Travel
    • Singles

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    Kleinmarkthalle: The Little Market That Could!

    by Joumaky Updated Jun 20, 2013

    Notable vendors:
    Schreiber Sausage - Always a line up
    Sausage Dey
    Bakery Huck
    Persian specialties
    House Persie

    What to buy: Food Market Fair: Flowers,meat,bread,vegetables,fruit,olive oils,wine...etc. You can also have lunch upstairs.

    What to pay: Average

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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    Lebkuchen-Schmidt: Ginger Bread Gifts & Other Goodies

    by Joumaky Written Jun 20, 2013

    Incredibly delicious gingerbread cookies and other goodies

    opening Hours:
    Mon - Fri: 9:30 to 14:00 & 15:00 to 18:30
    Sat: 10:00 to 16:00

    What to buy: Cakes & Tarts, Pastries, Praline, Lebkuchen (Ginger bread), cookies and Coffee. They also have items that are Lactose-free and Glutenfree.

    What to pay: 10 - 20 EUR

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    A Taste of Britain: When you just have to have a large jar of Marmite

    by Nemorino Updated Apr 8, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A Taste of Britain

    Somehow in the course of my travels I have developed a taste for a quirky British product known as Marmite. This is a yeast extract, a black, salty substance which is a by-product of beer brewing. The British spread it on toast, but as a non-British person I take the liberty of spreading it on German bread or Swedish knäckebröd, often with cheese.

    I know a German supermarket that sells tiny little jars of Marmite – ridiculously tiny – but the only place I know of in Frankfurt where you can get a large or medium jar of Marmite is a shop called “A Taste of Britain” on Oeder Weg, a block north of Eschenheimer Turm.

    In addition to Marmite, they sell a wide range of British food products such as Twinings Tea, Tetley Tea, PG Tips Tea, Typhoo Tea, Yorkshire Tea, Nairn’s Oat Cakes, Carr’s Table Water, Jacob’s Cream Crackers, Cadbury Chocolate, Walkers Crisps, Colman’s Mustard, Clotted Cream & Scones, Crumpets, Vintage Cheddar, Robinson’s Squash, Self-Raising Flour, Soft Brown Sugar and Branston Pickle, among many others.

    To non-British people, this might not sound like a very promising business plan, but the shop has been thriving since 2004, so there is evidently a market for this sort of thing.

    A Taste of Britain is open (as of April 2013) from Tuesday- Friday 11:00 - 18:00, Saturday 10:00 - 18:00. When I spoke to the owner, he asked me to mention that they also deliver (within Frankfurt, in the evenings after the shop closes) and they have an online ordering service.

    The word Marmite, by the way, comes from the French, where it means a big covered cooking pot. But I have never noticed any French people eating Marmite, have you?

    The Australians have something similar (or identical?) but they call it Vegemite and claim it is superior to Marmite. Fortunately for them, there is also an Australian shop in Frankfurt, where genuine Vegemite is sold.

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    British Book Shop: Books in English

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 28, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    British Book Shop

    This is a small centrally-located bookshop with a good selection of books in English.

    Also they are very nice about letting English-speaking people put notices up in their window -- for a small fee, if it's something commercial, or for free if they consider it to be in the public interest. So their window is a good place to start looking if you want to trade English for German lessons, or if you want an English-speaking baby sitter or an English conversation club.

    At certain times of year you can even see a notice there about Germany's only English-language opera appreciation course, "Frankfurt OperaTalk."

    What to buy: For example you could buy a copy of the novel Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut, to read on the train on your way to Dresden.

    What to pay: Since the books are imported, they cost somewhat more than you would pay in the UK or the United States.

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    Musikalien Petroll: Sheet music and music books

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 28, 2012

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Musikalien Petroll

    This is one of the best places in Frankfurt to get sheet music and music books. They also have “coaching CDs” which just contain the accompaniment to opera arias, so aspiring singers can practice singing the arias themselves.

    Related to:
    • Music

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    Open till eight! No, till ten!

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 28, 2012

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A typical HL store, Frankfurt am Main

    Open till eight! -- "So what else is new?" you might ask.

    Let me explain that until quite recently the opening hours of stores in Germany were strictly regulated. They all had to close promptly at 18:30 (6:30 p.m. to you) on weekdays and at 13:00 on Saturdays.

    For people like me -- working full time, and not an early riser -- that meant it was not easy to find a time to go shopping. All of us in this situation tended to go shopping around 11:00 on Saturday mornings, which meant that the stores were all packed at that time. You couldn't even get a shopping cart, and there were long lines at all the check-out lanes. Very stressful, aside from the fact that I sometimes had other things I wanted to do on Saturday mornings.

    So now it is a great relief that a normal store like this one is open until 20:00 Monday through Saturday.

    This particular store is the closest one to my house, right in front of the S-Bahn station. It is only a medium-size supermarket, which means for example that they stock creamy peanut butter but not crunchy. Fortunately there are several larger stores within easy cycling distance that have both kinds, so I don't have to do without.

    Update: The store in the picture is now open till 10 p.m. six days a week. Who ever would have thought this could happen in Germany, of all places? (It's no longer a HL store, by the way. Name changed to Minimal and now to Rewe.)

    And they now stock crunchy peanut butter as well as creamy. Still no Marmite, however.

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    Zweirad Ganzert: Excellent bicycle sales and service

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 28, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Ganzert's bicycle shop, Frankfurt am Main

    Frankfurt has several excellent bicycle shops, but Ganzert's is the one I go to most often.

    For one thing, it's close to my office. If something is wrong with my bike I can just leave it off on the way to work and pick it up the same day on the way home.

    I even used to do this with flat tires, but now I don't have flat tires any more since they put MARATHON tires on both wheels. These are really a great invention and well worth the extra cost.

    Recently they had to send the back wheel of my new bike back to the factory to get it fixed under the guarantee, and they lent me another bike for about three weeks. The whole thing didn't cost me a cent, and my bike has been working fine ever since.

    The only time they didn't have a substitute bike for me was on 911, but that's a whole nother story.

    At the workshop entrance at the back of the store they have a sign reading (rough translation): "We do not repair bicycles bought in supermarkets, building materials stores or coffee roasting shops."

    And that's a good policy, because these cheepo bikes are really low quality and no self-respecting mechanic would be willing to take responsibility for them being in good repair.

    Last year I was in another German city, Zwickau, and saw a bicycle shop with a nice slogan in English: "Life is too short to ride a sh!tty bike!"

    What to buy: A bicycle, if you haven't got one already. And a good lock, of course, and a helmet.

    What to pay: You can get a decent bicycle for EUR 500 or upwards -- with no upper limit that I know of!

    I tend to stay towards the lower end because I cycle the city daily year-round, and an expensive bike would get stolen sooner or later.

    Related to:
    • Cycling

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    Euro Information centre & bookshop: Books about money in several languages

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 28, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    ECB bookshop and info center

    Well, not only about money, but that's of course the emphasis because money is what the European Central Bank is all about, and this is their bookshop on the ground floor of the Eurotower.

    They also have a small but interesting selection of other books in several languages.

    What to buy: Aside from books, you can also buy a European Central Bank T-shirt or sweatshirt if by any chance you don't have one already.

    Another item that might be useful if you are looking for a gift for a Rich Relative Who Has Everything is a brick made of Deutsche-Mark-banknotes that were once worth DM 100,000.00 before they were shredded and pressed together very firmly in the shape of a brick. This costs EUR 9.00 and looks somewhat like a large piece of Weetabix. It might also be an appropriate gift for a disgruntled German who doesn't like the Euro and wishes Germany hadn't given up its national currency.

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    Lebkuchen Schmidt: Ginger Bread all year around

    by dircelo Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    shop front
    3 more images

    A very nice shop for the unique ginger breads and other candy and sweets, not only for Christmas though, but for all year around.

    Filled Chocolate Eastereggs are the popular thingy right now. But still available, and a very extraordinary and great gift: the ginger breads in special boxes.

    Also store locations in Stuttgart, Munich and Nuremberg (which is the Main production site).

    What to buy: "Dominosteine" or "Marzipankartoffeln"

    What to pay: pay more than average for exclusivity.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

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    DOM: Fun Gifts etc.

    by dircelo Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Shopfront in Sandhofpassage
    1 more image

    Always changing merchandise to bring fun and/or something new to your home, great gifts items from around the world, jewelery, some cds, china, schnick schnack, party stuff always trendy and nicely designed.

    Some of it you do not really need, but still fun watching and considering changing home- interiors very other month..

    What to buy: Not only in Frankfurt but at several other locations in the world...

    What to pay: average

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    My Zeil: One of the big trade centers

    by mirchica Written Jan 9, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    This is a shopping complex located on Zeil in a nice office complex with a hotel also. It’s glass with the shape of a vortex. The interior is even more spectacular with irregularly shaped ramps and glass columns.

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    Zeil: The Mall street

    by mirchica Written Jan 9, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    First I thought it was a trade center or a mall but actually it’s a street, boulevard, area, district or whatever you’d like to call it. This is the biggest and most famous shopping area in Frankfurt, located in the center of the city – shops, restaurants, cafes, everything. There is something for everybody

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  • All shops offering duty-free checks: Don't try to get your V.A.T. back in Frankfurt

    by dshachar Updated Sep 3, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What to buy: Many shops in Germany will offer you a tax-free check after you complete your purchase. This supposedly means you will get almost 20% of your money back when you leave Europe. However, the company that returns your money to you takes half of your refund, leaving you only 10%. Also, that company is pretty well hidden within Frankfurt Airport. We spent several hours looking for it, only to find that they would only return 10% of one purchase, and nothing on another purchase, as we couldn't find the original receipt, even though we had a copy printed by the store. If you can find a customs official at the airport, they will give you a form which you can mail back to the original store. If I had a suspicious nature, I would think that the German government is trying to dissuade people from getting their tax back...

    Here's my advice for enjoying your shopping experience in Germany in general, and in Frankfurt in particular: When you shop at stores, save your receipts together with a list of the exact address of each store. If you find a customs officer when you're leaving Europe, get a special tax-return document for each purchase. However, while shopping bear in mind that the price you're paying is probably the final price, with no refund.

    If you really feel like getting something duty free, buy it AFTER you pass through the border controls on your way to the plane,. Everything on that side of the border is already V.A.T. free. Unfortunately, this takes away the fun of shopping on Frankfurt's main shopping streets, like the Zeil. Next time, I'm just going to shop without worrying about V.A.T.

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