Fun things to do in Frankfurt am Main

  • Kaiserdom from my balcony, Frankfurt
    Kaiserdom from my balcony, Frankfurt
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    Frankfurt on the Main
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    Alte Opera, Frankfurt
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Frankfurt am Main

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    Frankfurt OperaTalk

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 5, 2014

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    If you speak English, live in or near Frankfurt and are interested in opera, be sure to sign up for Germany’s only English-language opera appreciation course, Frankfurt OperaTalk, at the Volkshochschule (vhs), the city’s non-profit, public service adult education center.

    At Frankfurt OperaTalk, English-speaking opera fans meet at the VHS to get acquainted with each other and with the lively Frankfurt opera scene. Native and non-native speakers of English are cordially invited to enroll. The discussions are friendly and unpretentious, and you don’t have to be an opera expert to take part.

    Often an English-speaking singer or musician is on hand to answer questions about current opera productions and about life on the international opera circuit.

    The seventeenth round of Frankfurt OperaTalk is scheduled to take place on four Monday evenings in the spring of 2015: March 2, March 16, April 20 and May 4. Enrollment has already begun at www.vhs.frankfurt.de.

    Full disclosure: Since I am the teacher of this course, I might be somewhat biased, but I do think it’s a great way to meet English speaking opera fans (and singers) in Frankfurt. This is why I go on teaching Frankfurt OperaTalk, even though it is more work than any of my other courses and brings in the least money.

    Second photo: Baritone Nathaniel Webster at Frankfurt OperaTalk.

    Third photo: Bass-Baritone Simon Bailey at Frankfurt OperaTalk.

    Fourth and fifth photos: Baritone Zeliko Lucic at Frankfurt OperaTalk. See also: New York Metropolitan Opera Live in Frankfurt.

    Address: VHS, Sonnemannstraße 13, 60314 Frankfurt am Main
    Directions: Across the intersection from the new headquarters of the European Central Bank.
    See also: Frankfurt Skyline Countdown, the future # 7 on my Land Hessen page.
    Location of the VHS on Google Maps.
    Phone: (0 69) 212-71501
    Website: www.vhs.frankfurt.de
    See also: Frankfurt OperaTalk on Facebook.

    Composer Jens Joneleit at Frankfurt OperaTalk Nathaniel Webster (on the right) Simon Bailey at Frankfurt OperaTalk Zeliko Lucic at Frankfurt OperaTalk Zeliko Lucic at Frankfurt OperaTalk
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    The Frankfurt Opera

    by Nemorino Updated Oct 14, 2014

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    This new opera house is not one of the architectural wonders of the world, I must admit, but it's a great place to go and see operas. It has one of the largest stages in Europe, with two revolving stages -- a small one inside a larger one -- that can both start turning at the same time if need be. And they have since built a third revolving stage to go on top of the other two.

    If by any chance you are in Frankfurt when they are showing Benjamin Britten's opera "The Turn of the Screw" you can see all these revolving stages in action at once, which is very appropriate considering the title of the opera. Their "Turn of the Screw" is a brilliant production, and it's even in English because they do most of their operas in the original languages. (With German surtitles, if that is any help.)

    Second photo: View from the foyer, with the twin Deutsche Bank Towers in the background and part of the Euro Tower on the right.

    Third photo: Inside the Large Hall of the Frankfurt Opera.

    Fourth photo: Stage entrance, with bicycles.

    Fifth photo: Under the golden clouds in the lobby.

    Video: Have a look at their trailer on Keith Warner's new staging of Hänsel & Gretel by Engelbert Humperdinck as well as trailers on other recent productions.

    Foyer of the Frankfurt Opera, Willy-Brandt-Platz View from the foyer, with metal Large Hall of the Frankfurt Opera Stage entrance, with bicycles Under the golden clouds in the lobby
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    Schloss Johannisburg Castle in Aschaffenburg

    by GracesTrips Updated Aug 29, 2014

    My boyfriend took me to see this castle along the river Main (pronounced "mine"). There were some artifacts and paintings in it, sort of a museum. The architecture was great and the details such as the hinges on the doors and the concave ceiling in the chapel room was very interesting to see. It was built between 1605 and 1614.

    Also, inside was a collection of model replicas of the Roman buildings such as the Coloseum and the Pantheon. They were used as examples in the study of architectural design. This was especially wonderful for us to see since we were in Rome the week before.

    There is a fee to visit the interior of the castle but I don't recall how much. Not very crowded so it's fairly easy to visit. Mostly school children on a field trip.

    Related to:
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    • Castles and Palaces

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    Visit Rüdesheim am Rhein

    by GracesTrips Updated Aug 29, 2014

    This is a very quaint, famous, very old city on the outskirts of Frankfurt. I probably should have posted in the Off the Beaten Path category. Anyway, this is a lovely little town with great shops and restaurants. Worth checking out!

    See my travelogue for more pics!

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    Wine Tasting

    by GracesTrips Updated Aug 29, 2014

    Wine tasting in Germany is seasonal. And, oddly enough, the wine tasting/restaurants are only open for a few months to give other establishments the opportunity to have their share of the customers during the time they are open. This particular wine tasting room was (I believe) just selling wine. Germany is better known for their white wines rather than red wines. This particular winery had decent wines and the prices seemed reasonable, too.

    Located just south of Frankfurt, less than 30 minutes.

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    The Mainfest

    by rosequartzlover1 Written Aug 7, 2014

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    (part 2)The Mainfest normally will be held at the beginning of August ,mostly start on Friday evening.There will be live music ,fireworks ,fairground rides,children play ,games.. like in the old days. The event start by a representative from the municipal authorities who will perform the opening ceremony at 6.00 pm , in front of the Fountain of justice which will be transformed into a wine fountain for the occasion. And those of the fairgrounds,snack shops and drinking stall spread from the square until the Main quay.
    The Mainfest was originally a festival for fishermen and boatmen and was supposedly derived from the consecration of the Dreikönigskirche (Church of the Three Kings) on 23 July 1340. The purpose of this festival was to give thanks and pay homage to "Their river and its bounties.
    The opening hours is from 12.00 to 1.00 am on Friday and Saturday ,and from 12.00 to midnight on Sunday and Monday.I was there on Saturday evening and there were really many people of all ages.I enjoyed the festival very much, the atmosphere were so lively and fun,..the weather was perfect ..and people seemed to be very happy.There were many food and drink stalls everywhere.
    There'll be fireworks display on the last day which is the following Monday,I wasn't there ..it's a pity
    There are no car parking facilities for the event, it' sbetter to go by public transport. Take subway (U-Bahn) U4 or U5 to "Römer" or the tram lines 11 or 12 to "Römer/Paulskirche .
    I got off at Hauptwache and did the window shop along the way to kill time before joining the festival at the dusk .

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    The Mainfest

    by rosequartzlover1 Written Aug 7, 2014

    This is the “ Mainfest” a very interesting summer festival in Frankfurt.The festival was held at the Römerberg square and along the Mainkai ( Main quay) of the "Main "river.This year 2014 the festival start from 1-4 August.I was there on Saturday 2 August evening.There was live music at the Römerberg square ,the music stage was between the Fountain of Justice and the Ostzeile ,the row of the half- trimbered housed on the east side of the square.This festival is originally a fisherman's festival and is one of the oldest festivals in Frankfurt, going back hundreds of years to the Middle Ages, when locals celebrated the river Main with roasted oxen on a spit, mystery plays, wine fountains and carriage parades.

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    The Fairy Tale Fountain

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 17, 2014

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    Thanks to VT member wabat (Albert from Canberra, Australia) for pointing out that up to now my Frankfurt am Main page has not included any mention of the Fairy Tale Fountain.

    He noticed this because on his recent visit to Pyongyang, the capital of North Korea, he was given a tour of the Mansudae Art Studio, a huge operation which produces all the millions of statues and paintings of North Korea’s first two “leaders” Kim Il-sung (1912-1994, now officially known as the Eternal President of the Republic) and his son Kim Jong-il (1941-2011).

    In addition to great masses of official artwork portraying the Kim dynasty of North Korea, the Mansudae Art Studio also produces statues for clients in other countries. As wabat explains, “there is now a worldwide shortage of socialist realist artists” following the collapse of communism in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, “so up and coming Africa dictators and others have turned to North Korea for their statues and such like. This work has become quite a lucrative source of foreign exchange for North Korea.”

    He says that this overseas work includes statues and monuments in Botswana, Senegal, Namibia, Benin, Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    And then comes the Frankfurt connection: “On a more modest scale the current incarnation of the Fairy Tale Fountain in Frankfurt am Main, Germany was (rather controversially, in Germany) produced by the Mansudae Art Studio in Pyongyang.”

    After writing his tip on the Mansudae Art Studio, wabat sent me the link and added:
    “Would have linked to your page but can’t see a related tip/review there!”

    I wrote back: “LOL. I ride past the Fairy Tale Fountain every time I go to the opera here in Frankfurt, because it is on the same square as the new opera house, right next to the bicycle stands by the stage entrance, but I was unaware that it was made in North Korea and never thought to do a tip about it.”

    The next time I rode to the opera house the sun was shining, so I took some photos (including the first four photos on this tip), and subsequently did some research on the Fairy Tale Fountain.

    It took me only a few clicks to find an article from BloombergBusinessweek which tells the whole story. The article explains that the Fairy Tale Fountain was “an art nouveau relic from 1910 that had been melted down for its metal during World War II.” Since no blueprints of the original fountain could be found, the city of Frankfurt “needed sculptors who could work from old photographs to re-create the naked beauty gazing down on an array of cherubic children and enormous water-spewing reptiles and fish.”

    For this task, Frankfurt chose the Mansudae Art Studio in Pyongyang. The deputy director of Frankfurt’s Museum of Applied Art, Klaus Klemp, explained: “It was a purely technical decision. The top tier artists in Germany simply don’t make realist work anymore. North Koreans on the other hand haven’t experienced the long evolution of modern art; they are kind of stuck in the early 1900s, which is exactly when this fountain was made.”

    In November 2005, two German officials flew to Pyongyang to check on the progress of the sculpture. According to the Bloomberg article, the “quality of the work was impeccable, but the Germans did have one complaint: Their art nouveau fountain had been rendered with a slightly hard, angular communist touch.” One of the Germans was quoted as saying that the woman on the statue had kind of a cement block hairdo. “We explained to the head sculptor that the socialist realist style wasn’t really in vogue in Frankfurt at the moment. He was very receptive and softened the look accordingly.”

    Second photo: The lady at the top of the fountain. The metal construction off to the left is the stage tower of the Frankfurt Opera.

    Third photo: In this corner of the fountain, a boy seems to be torturing a fish, which is squirting out streams of water. To me, this part of the fountain looks much older, perhaps even a surviving part of the original fountain from 1910.

    Fourth photo: The fountain from behind, with a corner of the Frankfurt Opera and some skyscrapers in the background. (For details of the twenty-five tallest buildings in Frankfurt, please feel free to have a look at the Frankfurt Skyline Countdown on my Land Hessen page.)

    Fifth photo: A few days before hearing from wabat, I took this photo of VT member Emily2410 with the Fairy Tale Fountain more or less accidentally in the background. Actually we should have taken a closer look at it, because the lady at the top of the fountain is supposed to be a water nymph, and by coincidence we were on our way to see an opera about a water nymph, namely Rusalka by Antonín Dvořák.

    This was Emily’s first opera, by the way. After the performance we went around to the stage entrance so she could meet some of the singers.

    The Fairy Tale Fountain The Fairy Tale Fountain Part of the fountain Fountain and skyscrapers Emily at the fountain
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    AIRPORT: A380 Spotting

    by Kathrin_E Written Jun 6, 2014

    The A380 planes use the new "Z" wing in terminal 1, the back front of the bay behind the A gates. Looking into that bay is rewarding, often there are two or even three Lufthansa A380's docked to the gates. I also saw a Thai Airways one.

    I admit that spotting these big fat planes excites me. Frequent flyers may shrug their shoulders but I feel like a 10 year old again if I see them...

    We landed in Frankfurt on the way back from Stockholm and they put on a show for us.There were two Lufthansa A380's at the gates and while we waited for disembarkation, they both went out and got ready for takeoff. The disinterested rest of our party prevented me from waiting to actually watch the start and catch photos, but at least I caught a glimpse of one of them taking off. I know it is just physics, but still amazing to see such an enormous mass of steel airborne.

    Family photo A380 Portrait of A380 A380

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    Bridge: Eiserner Steg

    by Joumaky Updated Jan 26, 2014

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    Eisner Steg is a pedestrian bridge connecting the two banks of the main river. It should be renamed "Lovers Bridge" because of the hundreds of locks hanging on either side. Lovers engrave their initials and hang the lock to ensure everlasting love

    Eiserner Steg
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    Former Boerneplatz Synagogue/Old Jewish Cemetery

    by Airpunk Written Jan 21, 2014

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    Frankfurt's main synagogue was built in 1882 on the spot of a hospital in the former Jewish Ghetto. On November 9th 1938, it was destroyed by Nazi mobs and pulled down afterwards. Boerneplatz (Boerne Square) itself was renamed “Dominikanerplatz” in 1935 already – Ludwig Boerne was a Jewish literary critic.
    When post-WWII reconstruction began, the streets around Boerneplatz were not rebuilt in their original way. The big Kurt-Schumacher-Strasse was built and on the spot of the former synagogue, a flower market hall and a gas station were built. Only a marble tone placed by the Allied troops in 1946 commemorated the spot of the former synagogue. The former Boerneplatz became isolated from the main streets. In the late 1970s, the flower market was demolished and Boerneplatz got its original name back again. However, it took until the 1990s, to give the area a more dignified appearance. The remains of the former Jewish Ghetto were preserved as part of the Judengasse Museum (see separate tip), a metal frame showing the shape of the former synagogue was placed in the ground. The Old Jewish cemetery was encircled with a wall, including commemoration plaques for every Jewish Frankfurt citizen who was killed during the shoa/holocaust. A monument in form of a stone cube and trees is located behind the cemetery at Rechneigrabenstrasse. All these spots form the so-called “Gedenkstätte Neuer Boerneplatz” (Memorial Place New Boerne Square).

    The Old Jewish cemetery is the second oldest of its kind in Germany and was in use since the late 12th century. In the mid-19th century, it was given up. The Nazis destroyed many of the graves in the 1930s and 1940s, especially to use the tombstones as building material. However, they did not succeed in a complete destruction and some tombs and tombstones (especially 17th and 18th century) were still intact when the war ended. The cemetery is permanently closed. A key can be borrowed from the Judengasse Museum (you'll need a passport or national ID card for that). Guided tours are provided by the museum on request as well.

    Wall of remembrance, Jewish Cemetery Frankfurt Wall of remembrance, Jewish Cemetery Frankfurt Shape of the former Boerneplatz synagogue Rubble of former tombstones at the cemetery
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    Hammering Man

    by Airpunk Written Jan 13, 2014

    Jonathan Borofsky has placed different versions of this metal sculpture in several cities over the world. The sculpture's arm moves and in some cities, it looks like the man is hammering against a building. Frankfurt's Hammering Man is free standing and does not hit anything at all with his hammer. It was placed in front of the exhibition halls (Messe) in 1991. With 23 metres, it is the tallest of the Hammering Man series worldwide.
    The Hammering Man is often placed in business districts of wealthy cities. The sculpture stands for solidarity with the working class.

    Hammering Man
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    Sees Near The Airport

    by briantravelman Written Jan 7, 2014

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    "See" is the German word for "lake". There are a lot of these small sees, located next to the airport. Most of them are artificial lakes, that were made for mining. Some of them are only for mining, but a lot of them have a mine on one side, and a swimming beach on the other side. They are also nice places for a walk.
    The most popular swimming beach is at Waldsee.
    These lakes are good places to visit, if you have a few hour stopover in Frankfurt. If you want to leave the airport, but don't want to head all the way into the city center, you can take a cab to one of the lakes, relax for a few hours, than head back to the airport, and catch your connecting flight.
    There might be a problem getting a ride back, and walking is not a good idea, but you can always have someone call a cab for you, or give you a ride back. You can also try to arrange a pick up time with your cab driver, or have him dispatch another pick up. It's a good idea to write this down on a piece of paper for him, so he will remember. It's also a good idea to jot down the number of the cab company, or ask for his cell phone number, so you can get in contact with him.
    Whatever you do, remember to be back at the airport at least 2 hours before your connecting flight.
    The lakes are close to the airport, so this shouldn't be a problem. I would limit my visit to Langener Waldsee though, it is the largest, and most popular lake, and it's close to the airport. This lake is also the site of the swimming portion of the Frankfurter Sparkasse IRONMAN.
    If you have more time, you can visit more of the lakes. You can also visit these lakes, if you're looking for a little bit of nature in Frankfurt.

    Seegrube Baggersee Langener Waldsee
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    Main Cemetery Frankfurt

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Dec 13, 2013

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    The main cemetery of Frankfurt dates back to the 18th century; many graves date back to the 19th century. As many affluent and some famous citizens were buried here, those older tombs and gravestones often have the quality of neo-classical-style monuments. Apart from that, it is a very peaceful, quiet and beautiful place.

    One grave marked by a simple cross is dedicated to "Paulinchen". She was daughter to a friend of Heinrich Hoffmann, the author of the "Struwwelpeter" children`s book. When she died young, he dedicated a chapter in his book to the charakter "Paulinchen", thus making her immortal.

    Hauptfriedhof Frankfurt
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    Eintracht Frankfurt Museum

    by Airpunk Updated Oct 1, 2013

    Football fans will enjoy the Eintracht Frankfurt Museum which has a good exhibition about Frankfurt's largest professional football club. It does not only include old jerseys, pictures and tickets, but also short films, a critical exhibition about the Eintracht in the Nazi years and thousands of other items. The exhibits regarding May 16th 1992 are hidden in a black cupboard which you have to open. On this day, Eintracht lost a match under unlucky circumstances which costed them their first Bundesliga championship. If you don't want to spoil the surprise what is in that case, skip the second picture. The only drawback about the exhibition is the language: Everything is in German...
     
    Entry fee is 5,00 EUR for adults, concessions 3,50 EUR, FrankfurtCard holders 2,50 EUR, Frankfurt Museumsufer card holders free (2013). On days where there is an Eintracht Frankfurt home match, the museum is open from two hours to fifteen minutes before the match starts. Only those with a valid ticket for the match are granted entry and you still have to pay the entry fee on top of that!
     
    This place is obviously something for football fans only, but those with a little interest in German football history and culture will enjoy it.
     
    Oh, and one info: Wearing something from a rival football club (especially Kaiserslautern and Offenbach, sometimes Mainz) is allowed, but may bring you into trouble. FSV Frankfurt stuff is surprisingly OK - both big Frankfurt clubs treat each other like older and younger siblings.

    Eintracht Frankfurt Museum Poster from a championship lost in the last minute Frankfurt Stadium (Commerzbank Arena) Exhibits at Eintracht Frankfurt Museum The famous case...
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