Friedberg Things to Do

  • Burgkirche, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
    Burgkirche, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
    by gubbi1
  • Burgkirche, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
    Burgkirche, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
    by gubbi1
  • Fortress Garden, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
    Fortress Garden, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
    by gubbi1

Most Recent Things to Do in Friedberg

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    City Church

    by gubbi1 Written Apr 10, 2012

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    City Church, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
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    The City Church is built in gothic style. Here in this rather huge church you can admire the architecture of a gothic hall church aswell as the beautiful colored windows. It was built between 1260 and 1410.

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    Mikve

    by gubbi1 Written Apr 10, 2012

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    The Mikve is a Jewish Bath for religious purposes. In one house in the old town of Friedberg a mikve was discovered. It is 25 meters deep and is dated back to 1260. We were looking for it, but unfortunately when finding it, it was closed.

    Opening times:
    Tuesday to Friday 9-12 AM and 2-5 PM
    Saturday, Sunday 10-12 AM and 2-5 PM
    Entrance fee: 1 Euro, reduced 50 Cent

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    Commemoration Plate

    by gubbi1 Written Apr 10, 2012

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    Commemoration Plate, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
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    Commemoration Plate. On the main square towards the Adolfstower you will pass three information plates set up side by side. They commemorate the american and german army people of the Second World War. Close to the plate the German army had set up a defense for Friedberg. As the war was about to be lost the orders for them was to defend the town with the help of old men and kids until the bitter end. But the situation was that the american forces could easily wipe out the whole town. Against the normal habits and knowing the risks an american major drove into town to explain the situation to the germans. Despite the fact that also the German defenders in Friedberg would risk their life when giving up (death penalty was threatening deserters) they agreed. This saved the buildings of the town, but more important the lifes of many inhabitants. Friedberg is very thankful for the initiative of the american major.

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    Fortress Garden

    by gubbi1 Written Apr 10, 2012

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    Fortress Garden, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
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    The Fortress Garden was originally constructed for the purpose of defense for the fortress, but in the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century it was rebuilt into a baroque garden. Since 1918 the town of Friedberg leases the garden for recreation.

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    Georgsfountain

    by gubbi1 Written Apr 10, 2012

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    Georgsfountain, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
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    On the main square in the fortification you can admire the Georgsfountain. It was built in 1783 by the master builder Wörrishöfer from Bad Nauheim (neighbor town). The water used in the fountain was lifted from far down outside the fortification. Saint Georg is the parton of the kinights and the fortress and its figure was made by Burkhard Zamels from Mainz.

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    Climb the Adolfstower

    by gubbi1 Written Apr 10, 2012

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    Adolfstower, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
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    The Adolfstower is named after the count Adolf of Nassau, who was captivated in Friedberg. From the ransom this tower was built. Nowadays you can visit the tower which has become the oldest part of the fortress for a small fee of 1 Euro. Inside you can climb down some stairs to see the prison. If you take the effort you can also climb up the tower to the top from where you have a splendid view over Friedberg and the wide ares around. It is really worth it.
    Take care with the stairs, they are quite small and narrow.

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    Jewish ritual bath from the year 1260

    by Nemorino Updated May 2, 2011

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    1. Jewish ritual bath from the year 1260
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    Friedberg is one of the few places in Germany where there is a well-preserved Mikwe or Jewish ritual bath from the Middle Ages.

    It is like a large square well, five and a half meters wide and twenty-five meters deep, with a stone staircase leading down to the level of the natural ground water. The water is usually about five meters deep, though the water level can vary.

    This is said to be the most monumental Mikwe that still exists in Germany. Four others still exist in Andernach, Offenburg, Speyer and Worms, and a fifth has recently been discovered in Erfurt. The website Jewish Life in Erfurt gives this explanation:

    "For a Jewish community in the Middle Ages, the ritual bath was of great significance. It was primarily the women who had to visit the baths after giving birth and after menstruation, so that they could enter the synagogue after being purified. But men also had to be immersed in the Mikwe after contact with dead or sick people or other impure things in the religious meaning of the word, before they could visit the synagogue again. Tableware also had to be cleansed in the Mikwe before its first use or after ritual contamination. Bathing in the Mikwe was subject to precise rules. The completely naked body had to be fully immersed in the water, and even jewellery had to be removed first. The water had to be 'living' water; it could not be scooped out, only spring water or ground water was allowed, and the basin needed to contain the equivalent of at least one cubic metre of water. Bathing was in cold water at all times of the year, although warm water could be added."

    Second photo: Stone stairs leading up from the Mikwe.

    Third photo: Looking down at the Mikwe.

    Fourth photo: The entrance to the historic Mikwe is through this house that was built in the year 1902.

    Fifth photo: At the entrance to the Mikwe, on the ground floor, is a small exhibit documenting Jewish life in Friedberg. It includes this plaque with the names of Jewish soldiers who were killed in the First World War while serving in the German army.

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    Adolf's Tower

    by Nemorino Written Apr 18, 2011

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    1. Adolf's Tower
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    The the north end of the Friedberg Castle complex is a tower known as the Adolfsturm or Adolf's Tower. The tower is 54 meters tall and is said to be the highest "historic" tower in Germany.

    The story of this is that in 1347 Count Adolf of Nassau was captured (not "captivated" as it says on several websites!) in one of the constant feuds that went on throughout the Middle Ages. He was held prisoner by the knights of Friedberg Castle, who demanded and finally received a large ransom for his release. The knights used the ransom money to build this tower and named it after their former prisoner: Adolf's Tower.

    Originally the tower must have been somewhat simpler than it is today. The pointed top and the four little corner towers are the result of a reconstruction in the year 1893.

    Second photo: Looking up at Adolf's Tower.

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    Friedberg Castle

    by Nemorino Written Apr 18, 2011

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    1. Entrance to Friedberg Castle
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    The Castle in Friedberg was begun in the years 1171 to 1180, presumably at the behest of the emperor Friedrich Barbarossa.

    Over the centuries it developed into an unusually large castle complex (the largest in Germany, they claim), so large that it now includes a high school, a tax office, a church and various other public and private buildings.

    Second photo: The finance department aka tax office, located within the castle complex.

    Third and fourth photos: Round towers at the southwest corner of the castle complex.

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    Wetterau Museum

    by Nemorino Updated Apr 18, 2011

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    1. Wetterau Museum from the outside
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    The area around Friedberg is known as the Wetterau, not because of the German word Wetter meaning weather, but because there is a small river named the Wetter (a tributary of the Nidda) which flows through this region not far from Friedberg.

    The Wetterau Museum documents the archeology and history of the region through well-organized exhibits (in German only) on two floors. The emphasis is on agricultural history. They point out, for instance, that until around 1830 there was a large rural proletariat in this region, workers with no land of their own who were hired by the day to help with the harvest, and they had to bring their own scythe or sickle. How they survived the rest of the year is a mystery.

    The existence of the large reserve army of cheap labor meant that the landowners had little or no motivation to modernize their operations, but that changed in the course of the nineteenth century as the laborers started emigrating to America in search of a better life. Eventually there was a labor shortage which forced the landowners to invest in better tools and machinery.

    Second photo: The courtyard of the Wetterau Museum.

    Third photo: A plow might seem to be just a plow, but it turns out that there were different shapes and forms of plows, and these kept evolving throughout the nineteenth century as landowners found themselves confronted for the first time with a labor shortage.

    Fourth photo: One of the first tractors from the early twentieth century.

    Fifth photo: On the upper floor of the museum there is a reconstruction of a general store as it looked in Friedberg around the year 1900.

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  • Walled City and Friedberg Tower

    by tammytoes Written Oct 9, 2005

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    myselt at the top of the tower!

    Just outside the downtown area of friedberg is it's historical Walled City. The town orgionally was built on the top of a hill, and was protected by thick motor walls. The city out grew it's walls, however, and now Friedberg sprawls out around the base of the hill. The "walled city" has now been transformed into a school, but the grounds remain open for tourists and locals to explore.

    It's a great place to walk your dog, or just to find a bench to sit down and relax.

    An old watch tower was used to guard the walled city,and it's still here in great shape today.

    The tower is pretty much Friedberg's trademark. It's situated in the Old Walled Town in the city, and you really can't miss it. For 1E tourists can walk up the steps to the very top of the tower which offers spectacular views of the entire city and surrounding farm lands.

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    Burgkirche

    by gubbi1 Written Apr 10, 2012

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    Burgkirche, Friedberg (Hessen), DE
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    The Burgkirche (Fortress Church) is one of the very few neo-classical churches in Germany. It was built between 1782 and 1808 to replace the medieval Fortress Church.

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Friedberg Things to Do

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