Fulda Things to Do

  • Things to Do
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  • Things to Do
    by bonio
  • Things to Do
    by bonio

Best Rated Things to Do in Fulda

  • history...

    by DaniBachmann Written Oct 6, 2003

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    A stroll through the old core of Fulda is always worthwhile...
    You should start off at the "Universitaetsplatz" heading towards the old city hall- don't get distracted by the shops, though :o))!
    Then towards "Unterm heilig Kreuz" a very nice church and from there you can either head towards the castle or stroll through the "Marktstrasse" and watch the people from one of the nice coffee- shops...
    ...before you head towards the "Bermuda- Triangle" and enjoy a nice german beer :o))

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    Hexenturm

    by IceBear7 Updated Nov 15, 2004

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    Apart from the Baroque quarter, you also find a lot of medieval buildings in the city center. Narrow lanes instad of wide avenues, little half-timbered houses instead of palaces, chapels instead of cathedrals. Little shops and workshops of craftsmen.

    In the picture you see the Witches' Tower, the best kept tower of the former city walls. It was formerly used as a women's prison.

    **more old city photos and info in the TL**

    Hexenturm
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    The Old Part of Town

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The old part of town is near the so-called "Baroque Quarter", with it's medieval half-timbered houses, remnants of it's walls and towers, which are still in use today, even if their are no longer guards and gatekeepers living in them.

    You can see the Witch's Tower in the Kanalstraße, which is still the best kept-up tower remaining from the old walls. Directly next to it is the birth house of Ferdinand Braun, who invented Braun Tubes, the forerunner for the television tube. The Severi Church (Severi Hill) is the only remaining Gothic Church in Fulda. Well-kept half-timbered houses that can still be seen in the Pfandhausstraße and on the "Unterm Heilig Kreuz" Square. This is where the old Rathaus is located, which was built before the 16th century, and added on to in 1531. These are just some of the more interesting buildings in the older part of town, which have lots of little shops and pubs.

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    Baroque Noble Palace in Fulda

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Looking out from the St. Boniface Plaza, directly over to the City Castle, you can get a great view of the Baroque Noble Palace, which the castle is grouped around. There is a whole group of little palaces, such as the Buttlar Palace, the Buseck Palace, the Altenstein Palace, the von der Tann Palace and the royal guard station. These royal buildings were housing for the royal administrators and were are designed by the same master builder, Andreas Gallasini. He designed this Baroque building group, which is very ornate.

    A look down the Friedrichstra��e
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    Baroque Quarter in Fulda

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    In the center of the City of Fulda is the "Baroque Quarter", which includes the City Castle building group, and runs from the St. Paul's Gate through the Orangery, the castle gardens, the cathedral and the cathedral chancellory to the Baroque
    Noble Palace.

    Baroque as well as half-timbered
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    Benedictine Abbey St. Maria

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    In 1626 the Abbey St. Maria was founded in Fulda and is still a Benedictine Abbey today. The abbey church is a plain building with late Gothic and Renaissance elements. Especially worth seeing in the interior where the altar is and where the nun choir is, where you can see the work from the former Mother Superior Lioba Munz, who passed away in 1997.

    They also have a shop in the abbey, where you can buy hand-made things that were made by the nuns.

    Hallway in St. Maria's Abbey
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    St. Blasius church

    by fairy_dust Written Nov 8, 2005

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    My friends and I went to St. Blasius church once because there was "international rosary" (the rosary said in many different languages) happening as part of the pre-World-Youth-Day events. This church was built in the 18th Century and is in the late baroque and late gothic styles.

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    Cathedral of Hesse

    by fairy_dust Written Nov 8, 2005

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    The most important landmark in the city of Fulda is the baroque cathedral in the middle of town. Because it houses the grave of St. Boniface, it is also a popular pilgrimage destination. The interior of the cathedral is very beautiful and one of the things that I loved the most about it, was how the altar and surrounding area glowed in the white walls. The statues and carvings were also quite impressive.

    The cathedral
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    The Fulda Cathedral

    by Weissdorn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I doubt there is no city more “Catholic” in all of Germany than Fulda. I don’t even think Cologne and Munich even come close, although they have nice cathedrals too. The county of Fulda and the surrounding region still have the largest numbers of seminary colleges, nunneries, and monasteries of anywhere in Germany. If you read that popular novel about the woman who became pope, then you must visit this place. This is where the novel took place. Centuries ago, the Fulda area was so religious that families and farms were disbanded and the members were sent to monasteries or nunneries. In the 12th century, they had to recruit people from other parts of the country, because the religious zealism reached the point that people were no longer having children for religious reasons. Many of the names of the small towns around the Fulda area still remind us of this period, because the towns’ names end with “Zell”, which was the smallest monastery community under the Lord Bishop’s rule in Fulda.

    In 1700 the Fulda Lord Vicar Adalbert von Schleiffras officially appointed the famous Baroque Master Builder Johann von Dientzenhofer to Court Architect. Dientzenhofer’s first assignment was to build a “modern” cathedral to replace the old Carolinian Charity Church.

    Bastian of Faith

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    In the basement

    by bilgeez Written Oct 23, 2004

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    The grave if St. Boniface is in the basement of the Cathedral (Dom) in Fulda. It is not a dreary place and there are statues of saints in the room that are interesting to look at, also. As I explained before, St. Boniface brought Chrisitanity to the area in 744 C.E. so he is very well-known in this area and the greatest of German saints, although Boniface was a monk from Ireland!

    Grave of St. Boniface
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    Off to the Side

    by bilgeez Written Oct 29, 2004

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    The Marienkapelle is in the Dom in Fulda.
    It is a side chapel that is bigger than many churches! It keeps with the extreme baroque theme of the rest of the Cathedral.
    Usually this chapel is used for smaller services by the public such as weddings and funerals.

    Marienkapelle
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    German Fire Fighting Museum

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    In three exhibition halls, you can see fire fighting equipment that goes from the Renaissance up until what is used today in Germany, as well as how fire fighting techiques progressed through the centuries.

    Many visitors wish that they could look just once at everything the musuem has, but hasn't put on display (because of the lack of space). As of Spring 2001, pre-registered groups can take a look at all the interesting stuff the musuem doesn't have room to display.
    You can call the number below to arrange a special group tour.

    Hours:
    Everyday except Monday from 10 a.m. through 5 p.m.

    Admission:
    Adults 3 €, Fire-Fighters, Youths, Children, Seniors, Students, and Groups up to 10 people 2 €, Family Ticket 10 €, Groups or Pre-registered tours 18 €, Children under 6 get in for free.

    Fire trucks galore!
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    Saint Paul`s Gate

    by IceBear7 Written Feb 4, 2003

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    The Paulustor marks the entrance to Fulda`s Baroque Quarter. From here it`s streets with cobblestones, beautiful palaces, the cathedral, tree-lined streets... The gate was built by Johann Dietzenhofer, it shows figures of saints, knights and coats of arms. Come and see it for yourself!

    St. Paul's Gate

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    Cathedral / Dom

    by IceBear7 Updated Feb 4, 2003

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    The Dom (Cathedral) in Fulda is probably its most famous building. Built between 1704 and 1712 in the (then) modern Baroque style it was restored a couple of years ago. Prince abbot Adalbert von Schleiffras had it built by the famous Johann Dietzenhofer, who took St Peter`s Church in Rome as a model. It replaced the Ratger Basilica which had been built in the middle ages and had been the biggest Carolingian building north of the Alps. Every summer there`s a big open air concert on the square in front of the Dom, they started with Montserrat Caballe a few years ago, they had Joe Cocker, Chris de Burgh, Andre Rieux ...

    Cathedral
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    Stadtschloss / City Palace

    by IceBear7 Written Feb 4, 2003

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    The beautiful Stadtschloss (city palace) in Fulda! Built on behalf of the prince abbots between 1706 and 1721 as an extension of the previous Renaissance castle. For centuries Fulda`s rulers were prince abbots - spiritual heads of the famous abbey in Fulda and secular leaders of the town and surroundings.

    The most famous prince abbots were Balthasar von Dernbach, Johann Bernhard Schenk zu Schweinsberg, Placidus von Droste, Adalbert von Schleifras, Konstantin von Buttlar, Adolf von Dalberg, Heinrich von Bibra and Adalbert von Harstall.

    You have to go on a guided tour through the palace - for example to visit the Chamber of Mirrors, also the private chambers of the prince abbots and a collection or rare Fulda china.

    Stadtschloss
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