Grünberg Things to Do

  • Lion's Fountain
    Lion's Fountain
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  • Town Church
    Town Church
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  • The Barefoot Monestary
    The Barefoot Monestary
    by Weissdorn

Most Recent Things to Do in Grünberg

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    Watch Tower

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Old Watch Tower

    On a hill in front of the old city walls you'll see a watch tower. Along time ago, ditches and wall used to protect this outside watchtower. The tower is 12.5 meters tall, as you can still see pretty far in the surrounding countryside even today.

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    Old Hospital

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Monastery, Hospital now it's a Museum

    The medieval town of Neustadt had it's own little church: St. Paul's. In the middle of the 15th century, the Augustine Monks built a monastery next to it. Only this long half-timbered building is all that is left of the monastery, which was the hospital for the town of Grünberg since the sixteenth century. This building was built sometime just before the year of 1500. It's large two-nave hall on the ground floor is typical for the way they used to build hospitals during this period in history. The Grünbergers have decided to put their city museum here. The rest of the monastery buildings have all disappeared through time. On the ruins of the old church, the cementary church was built. It's a baroque building, and the light coming through the windows makes it an inspirational church. There are all kinds of grave stones in the church, but the inscription under the southern window is interesting, which translates:
    1747 Let us buy the gulden hours / that tick in the clock of our lives / before the gears run down too fast / and leave the clock's hand standing.

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    Fountain Valley

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Lushious green near the brook bridge

    Near the path that leads into the well valley, there used be a town watchtower, which guarded the path to the drinking water source. Today it belongs to the Brunnental (fountain valley) recreational area. The well has been divided into two ponds since around 1824; before this there were three of them. The large water wheel is the last pumping station from the 19th century that still pumps water out of the ponds.

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    Winterplatz

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    House on Winterplatz with fountain

    The Winterplatz reigns over the former brewery, a half-timbered house from the 18th century. The lion on the fountain is a replica from the old one on the marketplace fountain. Directly above the cliff is a small stone house which dates back to 1582. This is where the pressurized water line ends, which pumped drinking water from a 60 meter depth, using various water piping systems ever since 1419. A small sign display explains how this was done.

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    Castle

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Castle Bay Window

    If you walk from the church plaza over the tiny bridge, you can see the birth house of Friedrich Gottlieb Welcker (1784-1868), a half-timbered house from the 17th century. Welcker was a predominent archaeologist, a professor in Bonn and friend of Alexander von Humboldt.

    On the most strategic place in town, on the cliff above the valley for the well, Landgrave Ludwig III built a castle in 1186. In the middle of the 16th century, a new building was erected, in which the Landgrave’s stewards lived. The building was sold to the citizens of Grünberg in 1810. Until 1969 it was a private house, which became more and more run-down, until it had to be torn down. Today you can still see remnants from the old city walls from the valley side of where the house once stood.

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    Church and the Smitty

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Town Church

    In the Judengasse (Jewish ally) you can see the old iron smith’s shop; an old and completely refurbished iron smith shop, which now belongs to the City of Grünberg.

    The town church was built in neo-gothic style from 1846-1852. Where it now stands was once the gothic church of St. Mary’s, which was the model for the Marburg St. Elizabeth Church in the second half of the 13th century. It collapsed in 1816. For decades it was a picturesque ruin; services were held in the nearby cemetery chapel. On the south side of the church is a replica of the “Mourners of Christ”, a graveyard sculpture by Samuel Nahl from 1770.

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    The Barefoot Monastery

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    The Barefoot Monestary

    Directly next to the Thieves' Tower you can still see the Gothic stone building of the Franciscan Monastery (also known as the bare-foot monastery). It was founded in the middle of the 13th century; the oldest document which attests it's existence dates back to 1272. In 1528 it was secularized (turned into a public building), and the last of the monks moved to Limburg or Cologne. Not long afterwards the building began to decay - there where the garden area now is. At the end of the 16th century, it was torn down except for the one still standing there, which has been completely restored. This probably was the living quarters for the monks. It's outer wall butts right up to the town’s walls. Today you can still see the stairway tower in the north and the interior, especially the arched cellar and the old fountain.

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    St. Anthony's Monastery

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    St. Anthony's

    The St. Anthony’s Monastery was very important for Grünberg’s history. It was sponsored by the Thurgian Landgrave in 1200. He also sponsored a monastery in Mecklenburg in 1222. Until the monastery was closed in 1526, it was a very influential monastery in middle Germany. The the buildings that make up the remains of the monastery consist of a trapazoid formed courtyard, which lies between the B 49 highway, the market place and the Rosengasse (rose ally).

    Directly from the parking place, you can see that the walls of the monastery were higher than the town’s walls were. Only the windows and the wonderful bay window are all that remain from the Refectorium, which are visible from here. On the smaller side of the monastery you will see the former church. With it’s front toward the Rosengasse you can see the castle, which was re-modeled by Eberth Baldwein to become the widow’s residence for the Hessian Landgraves. Characteristic is the beautiful Renaissance bay window.

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    Old Lion's Fountain

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Lion's Fountain

    The old Lion Fountain delivered the people of Grünberg their drinking water until the end of the 19th century, directly from the Brunnental. Today the lion along with other parts of the fountain can be found in the former storage house on Winterplatz.

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    Old Post Office

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Old Post Office

    An especially beautiful Baroque House from 1668 is the former Postal Station. The high hall walls still remind us of the purpose for which it was built. On the rear side of the building you can see the living and business quarters, and the stalls and barns, which have long since been remodeled into apartments.

    You can't help but will notice the gap on the corner of the marketplace and the marketplace alley (Markt/ Marktgasse). This is the place where the so-called Luther House once stood until 1891. It was a supposedly impressive Gothic building, that Martin Luther stayed in until 1521.

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    The Well

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    How deep is the well?

    In front of the Rathaus (city hall) you can see a round stone well. The well is 36 m deep. Up until 1500 drinking water was extracted from this well. The well was finally filled in 1820. After that it was almost completely forgotten, until in 1980 when it was re-discovered and restored in time for the annual Hesse State Fair. The state fair takes place in a different city each year, so every year the city selected to host the fair goes to a lot of work fixing their city up.

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    Rathaus

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    City Hall is almost 500 years old

    The Rathaus (city hall) is a beautiful old Renaissance building dating back to 1586/87. The city acquired this house in 1593 from it’s builder, City Elder Hermann Rüdiger from Hersfeld and it’s been used as a city hall ever since then. The hall on the ground floor used to be a market and tradesmen room; the iron scale next to the doorway reminds us of this period. The stone doorway with it’s lovely sculptures was probably designed by the Landgrave’s Royal Master Mason Eberth Baldwein from Marburg. Especially noticeable are the carefully restored Renaissance Paintings and the stone sculpture of a man wearing Spanish Court clothes on the corner of the building.

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    Marketplace

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Through the centuries to the marketplace

    The marketplace was always the center of community life in the town. It's located directly on the old trade routes through "short Hesse" from Frankfurt through the middle of Germany. Today the marketplace and the streets ajoining it are almost an open-air museum for Hessian Half-Timbered Architecture for the past 500 years. The oldest standing buildings were built around 1500, and you can recognize them by their bay windows and the rounded "x"s between the half-timber supports, like for example the house located at Markt 6 (the ice cream parlor), or Alsfelder Str. 1/3, Marktgasse 6, Rabegasse 2, 8, 12. Just walk down the street and you can see different kinds of half-timbered houses from various centuries.

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    Monastery Courtyard

    by Weissdorn Written Feb 25, 2003

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    Old Half-Timbered Construction

    When you enter the courtyard of the monastery, you can see the monks’ house on the north side of the building. The most notable thing you will see in the grave stone set into the wall and the old working stones for the monastery. In the east you can see an old half-timbered building, from around 1500. This is the old university house. This is were the University of Marburg moved into during 1542 when the plague broke out.

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    Thieve's Tower

    by Weissdorn Written Sep 25, 2002

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    Thieve's Tower

    The symbol of the town in the Thieves' Tower (Diebsturm) with it unusual teardrop cross-cut form. Built in 1300, it stands on the most vulnerable place in Grünberg. For centuries it served as a prison, and that's how it got it's name. In 1895/96 it was re-modeled into a watershed. Because it was used as an ammunition depot in the Second World War, the allies partially blew it up. Since then, it's been restored and is now used as a visitor viewing tower. When the weather conditions are good, you can see the Taunus the Vogelsberg Mountains. Inside the tower are a few plaques explaining the history of the town's walls.

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