Königstein im Taunus Things to Do

  • Altstadt, Konigstein
    Altstadt, Konigstein
    by antistar
  • Altstadt, Konigstein
    Altstadt, Konigstein
    by antistar
  • Castle Ruins, Konigstein
    Castle Ruins, Konigstein
    by antistar

Most Recent Things to Do in Königstein im Taunus

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    Altes Rathaus

    by antistar Written Aug 29, 2013
    Altes Rathaus, Konigstein
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    The old town hall (altes rathaus) is the most striking half-timbered building in the old town of Konigstein. Passing through its gate is like walking back in time, the alley behind expands out into a street lined with medieval buildings. It no longer functions as a political building, and instead hosts the town's museum, a fitting role for a building that can date itself back to 1255. Central to the museum is a scale model of the castle above the town, showing how it looked before it was blown up by the French.

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    Castle Ruins

    by antistar Written Aug 28, 2013
    Castle Ruins, Konigstein
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    The French blew it to smithereens in 1796 during their Revolutionary Wars. Up until that point it had served as a stalwart defence of the town, fusing its lofty position in the Taunus mountains with solid local stone to protective barrier against all invaders. All invaders except the French that is. Napoleon would have his way with the westernmost German towns, and not just Konigstein.

    It's not a pretty castle, like its cousin across the valleys in Kronberg, but it does possess a certain brutal elegance. It's been lived in, but it's not a place for living. It's functional, tough, defiant, but now just a relic of a time when people needed the defence of castles, and when Germany was little more than a patchwork of fiefdoms whose castles defined their strength and influence.

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    Immanuel Evangelical Church

    by antistar Written Aug 28, 2013
    Immanuel Evangelical Church, Konigstein
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    Konigstein has always been a Catholic city, but it has Protestant ties that date back to the Reformation. At the end of the 19th century its small Protestant population decided to build their own church, instead of walking all the way to Kronberg for their congregations on the other side of the valley.

    The result of their labour was the charming neo-Gothic Immanuel Evangelical Church, a building that stands apart from the German churches typical to this region, just as it stands apart from the rest of the town. It lies, ensconced in trees, at the edge of town and at the foot of the castle.

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    Altstadt

    by antistar Written Aug 28, 2013
    Altstadt, Konigstein
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    Konigstein's Altstadt sits in the protective shadow of the castle, and isn't much more than a short strand of high street that runs from the marketplace to the town hall. The narrow streets that lead off from it are also pretty, especially those that lead up the hill to the castle and stretch out behind the town hall.

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    St. Marien

    by antistar Written Aug 27, 2013
    St. Marien, Konigstein

    The spire of St. Marien's church stands proudly above the Altstadt from its home on Kirchstrasse - the most prominent church in the old town. Inside the nave is a high alter created by master German architect, Johann Peter Jäger, who is responsible for a number of beautiful Rococo buildings around Germany, like the Palais Kesselstadt in Trier.

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    Opel Zoo & sponsorship of animals

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 24, 2011

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    Sponsorship of animals
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    Back when I was a child, dad took me & gfs often to the Opel Zoo, such sponsorships didn't exist back then.. Yet I do think it's a great idea. Some (German only written) explanations about any sponsorship are provided under the category Zoofoerderer.

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    • Arts and Culture

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    Opel Zoo & its dining place Sambesi

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 24, 2011

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    Restaurant Sambesi at Opel Zoo
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    Given it's beautiful sunshine, then it feels great to take a break & seat at Opel Zoo's dining place Sambesi. It's close to the elephants' camp, and a nice place right at the playground too.
    We've had fries, sausage, and the German specality Gruene Sosse & boiled eggs. It's a meatless meal, very German, very special, very healthy, very traditional in Hesse, and available only in the season of spring and summer. If you ever make it to the Opel Zoo, try out that food & place. It's wonderful.

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    • Food and Dining
    • Zoo
    • Family Travel

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    Opel Zoo & its loveliest playgrounds

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 24, 2011

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    Opel Zoo
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    Within Opel Zoo, there are two special sections. The first section contains a petting zoo where children can feed and pet the animals and the second section contains various play areas. These areas include slides, trampolines and a miniature railway system. The dining places are very nice and neat. The restrooms are very clean and very accurate for kids regarding space and height. The only minus, it's not a zoo for visitors with disability since it's a very hilly area.

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    • Family Travel
    • Zoo

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    The Opel Zoo

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 24, 2011

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    Opel Zoo
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    Not too sure what to think about zoos yet The Opel Zoo is one awesome place for any animals. And there for a truly beautiful and fun place to visit with or without kids. Opel Zoo is about 5 mns from Koenigstein town, and about a 20 mns drive from Frankfurt. Unlike other zoos the Opel Zoo is less about fenced in animals but like enbeded the Taunus hills & forest animals. The cages are not really cages, but large enclosures where the animals can live in a more suitable, comfortable environment. Within the zoo, there are two special sections. The first section contains a petting zoo where children can feed and pet the animals and the second section contains various play areas. These areas include slides, trampolines and a miniature railway system. Dining places are very nice and neat. Restrooms are very clean, and very accurate for kids regarding space and height. The only minus, it's not a zoo for visitors with disability since it's a very hilly area. The Opel Zoo's name is derived from Adam Opel who was the founder of the motor company which bears his name. The zoo has a wonderful variety of wild animals from all over the world. There are elephants, tigers, lions, zebras, hippos and many more.

    http://www.essortment.com/travel/frankfurtgerman_synf.htm

    Open:
    the intire year
    Winter 9:00 - 17:00
    Summer 9:00 - 18:00
    June/July/August 9:00 - 19:00

    Surprisingly Opel Zoo's webpage doesn't provid any information in English.

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    • Zoo
    • Family Travel

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    Falkenstein Fortress II

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 24, 2011

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    Falkenstein Fortress
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    Truly a wonderful place for kids too. It's not about consuming but creating, following fantasy and fairies. Of course keep a close eye on your little ones. Also there is a small store with a very nice dude providing ice cream.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Festivals
    • Family Travel

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    Falkenstein Fortress I

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 24, 2011

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    Falkenstein Fortress
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    Very much recommend a walk to, or around, the Falkenstein Fortress not just because I personally do love fortresses, castles, ruins, towers but because this place is indeed an extra ordinary one. Whether yes or no, one loves fortresses and castles, there it does feel and does look like a fairy tale. Meanwhile Falkenstein Fortress is also a location for festivals-goer in summer time.

    Play: My Fair Lady
    Time: August 23, 2008, 20:00
    Location: Falkenstein Fortress in Koenigstein, 61462

    Play: Carmen - by stars of "Mailaender Scala"
    Time: August 19, 2006, 20:00
    Location: Falkenstein Fortress in Koenigstein, 61462

    etc.

    Open:
    November to January on weekends only
    Fri : 12:00 to 15:30
    Sat: 9:00 to 15: 30
    Sun: 9:00 to 15:30

    February, March and October
    daily 9:30 to bis 16.00 Uhr

    April to September
    daily 9:00 to 18:30

    Adult 2,- Euro
    Kids 1,- Euro

    Little is known of the origins of Falkenstein. A record dated 1103 mentions the counts of Nuerings (Norings) as having estates in the surrounding area. This family died at the end of the 12th Century. The von Muenzenberg family was followed by the Falkensteins, descendants of a collateral branch of the lords of Bolanden, who had acquired Koenigstein castle in 1252. The Falkensteins built a new castle on the Noringsberg, which they called Neu-Falkenstein. In 1364 the castle was destroyed. The line of the lords of Falkenstein died in 1418, shortly after the castle ruin had passed into the possession of the lords of Nassau. The 15th. Century was the age of the robber barons of Falkenstein. Falkenstein was jointly owned by a number of knight's families. In 1679 the line of the lords of Staffel died, the last family of knights to live in the castle. The castle fell into decay, after the damage done in the Thirty Years War. Village families moved into the castle buildings. The counts of Nassau-Saarbruecken gave the fief to the imperial barons of Bettendorf, who governed in Falkenstein from 1681—1773 and made themselves hated by the people for their harshness. In the 19th. Century the towers and walls were torn down and the rubble used for buildings in the village. In 1842 Mr. Osterrieth, a Frankfurt businessman, got an order prohibiting further demolition. In 1954 the Falkenstein local authority bought the castle from the German Federal State of Hesse.

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    • Festivals
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Konigstein Castle Ruins

    by OSpencers Written Sep 28, 2004

    The Konigstein Castle ruins are a great diversion if your in the area. On entrance you have nearly free run of the whole place. The view from the tower is excellent. Frankfurt and much of the Main valley are visable. The town is very nice as well and has a beautiful Kurpark. Entrance is $1.50(?).

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    • Castles and Palaces

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    Koenigstein's St. Marien Church

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 24, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St Marien Church

    Under the partnership of Koenigstein and Le Cannet-Rocheville are frequent exchange visits between the communities, involving particularly young people, clubs and church communities.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

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