Rostock Things to Do

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    Rostock Wall
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Most Recent Things to Do in Rostock

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    Steintor ~ Renaissance City Gate Tower

    by starship Updated Apr 10, 2014

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    Steintor

    The first building which came into view as we walked toward the historical center of Rostock was the 'Steintor." The Steintor ("tor" - gate tower) which is an imposing structure once part of Rostock's city wall, is one of only several gate towers still surviving out of the original 22. Among the other gates still remaining is the oldest "Kuhtor." Steintor was built in the Renaissance style as opposed to the Gothic style when the majority of other gate towers were built. The Steintor is characterized by its steeply pitched tower-roof, and the large Coat of Arms of Rostock that can be seen directly above the vaulted gate opening. There appear to be several floors inside the tower which has windows, but I could not find out if they are still in use. I thought the structure looked rather modern and was surprised it was from the 1500's.

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    Rathaus in Rostock

    by starship Updated Apr 10, 2014

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    Thirteenth Century Rathaus ~ Rostock

    Rostock's Rathaus or Town Hall is a rather pretty building with a pink, Baroque facade which was added over the original Gothic architecture during its construction between 1270 - 1290. In its original life, not only was it a Town Hall but it also served as a trading center. Another addition during the late 15th century gave it the additional function as a Festival Hall. Note that the Rathaus has 7 towers which give it even more dimension. The 13th-century building which faces the central square, still plays an important part in the life of Rostock today as it serves as the city's adminstrative headquarters. Because it was Sunday when we arrived, there was little to no activity in the town square. Just a few straggling tourists who were just as disappointed as we were.

    There is a "Ratskeller" restaurant in the Rathaus which was restored and reopened in 2002 and which is supposed to be open daily from 11am to midnight. However, because there were so few people in the square and no one heading to a particular entrance in the Rathaus that we saw, we weren't even aware of the Ratskeller's presence at the time. We should have known that just about every Rathaus has a Ratskeller !!

    In my opinion, the most notable characteristic of this building is the lore revolving around a famous bronze snake on the Rathaus' left-most column. According to the local history of the 1200s, residents of Rostock had ample reason to be suspicious of outsiders. Anyone who wanted to enter the city, but was thought to be a stranger or enemy, had to prove their knowledge of the snake and its location in order to prove they actually were from the city of Rostock!

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    Rostock Brewery for Beer Lovers

    by starship Updated Apr 10, 2014

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    Rick & Andy with Rostocker Beer
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    We didn't get to visit the Rostock Brewery but I wish we had because I thought Rostock Beer was pretty darn good! Rostock master brewers follow a recipe which has been around since Rostock was an important Hanseatic city. How barley, hops and water are transformed into a great beer in 4 weeks or less is amazing. If you're wondering how this evolution takes place, treat yourself to a guided tour of the brewery to learn about the secrets of beer production. Though the recipe has been around for ages, today's beer is the product of modernized machinery and technique which yields Rostocker Beer at the rate of 50,000 bottles per hour!!!. BUT, sorry, if you're under 18 years old, you'll have to wait for your chance to see this process and taste the resulting amber-colored brew. For "adults" there is a tasty reward at the end of the tour!!

    Our ship put on a wonderful "Biergarten" before we left Warnemuende and you guessed it, the beer of choice was Rostocker and we brought home several souvenir glass mugs.

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    Powerful gate to enter old town

    by fred98115 Written Jul 12, 2011
    Kropeliner Tor
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    Once there were 22 gates to enter the old town of Rostock, and the most powerful of those was the Kropeliner Tor. If you are walking from the train station, you will have the chance to walk through the Kropeliner and enter into the town square. The Tor dates from the 13th century and is an interesting remnant from the early days. The town wall can also be found here.

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    Marienkirche features astronomical clock

    by fred98115 Written Jul 12, 2011
    Chandelier and ceiling
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    The church dates to the 13th century and seems like just another old church from the outside. Do not be misled, for inside is a treat for the scientifically, historically oriented person. It is the Astronomical Clock, created in 1472, that continues to keep time. Every day at noon wheels start and figures at the top begin moving to count off another day. Jesus exits a door and enters another and is followed by the twelve apostles, all that is except Judas who finds the door is slammed in his face and he is left out in the cold - a medieval joke on display. The rest of the church interior is fascinating as well, but the clock is the highlight. Tip: be early since a lot of people like to watch the action. Also, it is dark and flash is discouraged, so photographers select a fast ASA and be ready.

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    Volkstheater = People's Theater

    by Nemorino Updated Jan 19, 2011

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    1. People's Theater with reflections
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    This city-owned theater, which is also subsidized by the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, has its own drama, opera and ballet ensembles and its own orchestra, the North German Philharmonic.

    In the 1980s, towards the end of the German Democratic Republic, around 700 people were employed by the theater. Now they have less than half that number. At last count there were 341 employees, including 21 actors, 17 opera singers, 36 choral singers, 15 ballet dancers, 83 orchestra musicians and 70 technicians.

    Still, it's a large and impressive organization for a city of 200,000 people, and they put on an extensive program of drama, musical theater, ballet and concerts -- despite ongoing controversies and impending budget cuts.

    The premiere I attended was very nearly sold out, and the performance was excellent.

    Photos:
    1. People's Theater with reflections of the buildings across the street.
    2. Lobby of the People's Theater.
    3. In the Large Hall: seating, orchestra pit, curtain.
    4. Logo of the People's Theater (Volkstheater).

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    Orpheus in the Underworld

    by Nemorino Updated Jan 19, 2011

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    Taking their bows after the premiere

    All you loyal readers of my Paris Off the Beaten Path tips (thanks again to both of you!) may recall that in one of these tips I described the light satirical operettas known as "Offenbachiades", by the composer Jacques Offenbach (1819-1880). In his long career Offenbach wrote exactly 100 of these operettas, which were hugely successful in Paris in the 1850s, 60s and 70s.

    I have seen several of these "Offenbachiades", but the one I know best is La Péricole, because I saw it several times when the Frankfurt Opera staged it in 1998, and I saw it again at a small theater in Paris in the summer of 2008.

    On my third trip to Rostock in January 2009 it happened that the Volkstheater was doing its premiere of a new production of one of the most famous of these "Offenbachiades", Orpheus in the Underworld.

    Now the story of Orpheus is actually a tragedy which has been dealt with in numerous serious operas, beginning with Claudio Monteverdi's L'Orfeo from the year 1607 -- one of the very first operas ever written.

    But Offenbach and his librettists changed the plot around to make it very funny, and the staging in Rostock was superb. At the end of the premiere everyone involved was warmly applauded, including the stage director Babette Bartz.

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    Theater in the City Harbor

    by Nemorino Updated Jan 19, 2011

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    Theater im Stadthafen

    This historic building in the City Harbor has been renovated and turned into a small theater with exactly 200 seats.

    (In Frankfurt they would have left out the 200th seat because of fire department regulations, but here the cut-off point seems to be different.)

    This little theater belongs to the Volkstheater (People's Theater) and is used for smaller, alternative drama productions.

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    Wokrenterstraße

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 21, 2009

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    Wokrenterstra��e
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    One street in the harbour quarter has preserved, or better re-acquired, its pre-war appearance with a row of gabled houses.

    The oldest among them is the so-called Hausbaumhaus, a brick gothic house dated around 1490, which still has its historical roof construction carried by one single long tree trunk.

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    Town Wall and Ramparts

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 21, 2009

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    Park along the town wall
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    The old town fortifications are partly preserved along the southern and eastern edge. The most impressive parts can be found in the southwest between Kröpeliner Tor and Schwaansche Straße. Outside the town wall we still have the ramparts, now turned into a park, and further below a rest of the deep moat which once surrounded the city.

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    Universitätsplatz

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 21, 2009

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    Universit��tsplatz and fountain
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    University Square is the liveliest spot in the city. University students and shoppers in Kröpeliner Straße mall pass and take a rest underneath the trees. The “Joy of Life” fountain in the middle of the square (see separate tip) attracts kids and adults.

    Buildings around Universitätsplatz:
    Main university building in the west (see separate tip)
    Barocksaalgebäude with the street gate (around 1750): formerly the Ducal theatre, it is now used for cultural events.
    Palais of the Ducal family (1714)
    Hauptwache (1823): the neoclassical guard-house with a huge Doric porticus
    Fünf-Giebel-Haus (1983-1986): named after its five gables. Mecklenburg’s local tradition of bricks and stepped gables has been translated into DDR postmodern architecture.

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    University

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 21, 2009

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    University
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    Respect please: The University of Rostock was founded in 1419. It was the first university in the whole of Northern Europe, a centre of humanism that influenced Scandinavia and the Baltic states. In those times it was known as “the Light of the North”.

    The main building in Universitätsplatz is, however, much younger. The renaissance style of the façade reminds us of the Ducal Palaces in Wismar and Schwerin but it is a 19th century ‘neo’ which was built in 1867-1870.

    The building is open, at least on weekdays, and you can walk in but don’t ask if you may. The main staircase is worth a look and **whispers** there are free public toilets behind the foyer on the ground floor.

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    Steintor

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 21, 2009

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    Steintor
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    Steintor, the gate tower on the southern side of the old town, used to be the main entrance of the old town. It received its present appearance in 1576/77 when the facades and roof were redesigned in renaissance style.

    Above the gate, the crests of the city (golden griffin on blue ground above a silver and white field) and the Duchy of Mecklenburg (black bull’s head) are shown – a small version on the outer side, a more elaborate and larger version on the inner side together with the Latin inscription, Sit intra te concordia et publica felicitas (may there be unity and public happiness inside you, i.e. the city).

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    DDR Post Office Building

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 21, 2009

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    Post office building
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    The post office on the corner of Neuer Markt is a post-war building. An inscription, which deserves to be classified as protected cultural heritage because of its original DDR language, tells that the old post office was destroyed by “Anglo-American bombs” and a new building has been erected by “the efforts of the working population”.

    Apart from the post office, this building also hosts the city tourist office.

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    Petrikirche – Church of St Peter

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 21, 2009

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    Petri church
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    The medieval brick gothic basilica of St Peter was heavily damaged by World War II. In DDR times it was left in a miserable state. The rebuilding was only finished in 1994 with the addition of the tall pointed spire.

    The church is standing on a hill with a steep descent down to the river Warnow and looks most imposing when approaching the city from the east.

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