Rostock Transportation

  • Transportation
    by bonio
  • Transportation
    by bonio
  • Transportation
    by bonio

Most Recent Transportation in Rostock

  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Laage Airport and more

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Dec 10, 2014

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    By plane: Via the Laage Airport (25 km south of Rostock)
    By boat: Via Warnemünde (small boats) or the Rostock Überseehafen (several ferries).
    By car: Autobahn 19 and 20.
    By train: Travel to Rostock Hbf (www.bahn.de).
    In the city center: walking.
    Outside the center: either bus or S-bahn
    The tourist way: take a sightseeing boat.
    Alternative way: biking.

    Real time Public Transportation info on the Rostock map.

    Autobahnkreuz Rostock
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    • Road Trip
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  • bonio's Profile Photo

    Finnlines

    by bonio Written Jul 18, 2011

    Departed Rostock heading for Gdynia in Poland, an overnight sailing of around 14 hours.
    An inside cabin for us, not huge but perfectly adequate with an ensuite shower / toilet. Ship itself, the mv Nordlink, pretty modern with surprisingly reasonable prices in the bar / cafe. Restaurant only open for a limited time but snacks available in aforementioned!
    Enjoyable voyage and tempted to try another of their routes in the future.

    borrowed from Finnlines!

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  • tpk2's Profile Photo

    To Finland by Boat

    by tpk2 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Superfast ferries run daily line from Rostock to Hanko, Finland. The trip takes around 24 hours. The price without a cabin is not that bad and you can sleep pretty comfortably on the floor (if you are quick enough to reserve a spot;) Check the webpage for timetables and prices.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Changing trains in Hamburg

    by Nemorino Updated Jan 19, 2011

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    This is the platform in the Hamburg main station where I changed trains both in 1989 and in 2009 on my way to Rostock.

    In 1989 it all went fine, despite the overcrowding that resulted from thousands of East Germans returning home from their first day-trip to the West. The railroads were efficient and flexible in those days, and the West and East German railroad systems worked together despite the political differences of their governments, so they added extra cars to the West-East trains. This made the trains longer than the platforms at some of the East German stations, but nobody minded this, and people helped each other off onto the ground.

    In 2009 the situation was much more chaotic because someone had committed suicide by throwing him- or herself in front of a train, causing the line to be closed for several hours while the police collected evidence.

    The official euphemism for this in German is Personenschaden, which literally means "damage to a person".

    Throwing oneself in front of a train has unfortunately become somewhat fashionable since a German millionaire, Adolf Merckle, killed himself this way a few weeks ago in Bavaria after bankrupting himself and his pharmaceutical and cement companies by gambling on the stock market.

    I don't know who it was who committed suicide when I was trying to change trains that day in Hamburg, but the result was that the train to Rostock had to be delayed indefinitely . . . or re-routed via Lübeck . . . or cancelled altogether . . . or?? . . .

    Every few minutes a different version came out over the loudspeakers.

    This is a typical problem of the current mismanaged German Railroad System DB, namely that they are incapable of making clear decisions and giving clear information when something goes wrong.

    Even so, I always recommend traveling by train in Germany, because the alternatives are even worse -- and irresponsible!

    Eventually the InterCity train 2376 left Hamburg 80 minutes behind schedule and arrived in Rostock 60 minutes behind schedule, having made up twenty minutes along the way.

    Photos:
    1. Changing trains at track 8 at the main station in Hamburg.
    2. Waiting at track 8 for further announcements.
    3. Ice in the harbor on the way into Hamburg on the train.

    1. Changing trains at track 8 in Hamburg 2. Waiting at track 8 for further announcements 3. Ice in the harbor on the way into Hamburg
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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Train Station

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 21, 2009

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    Rostock’s train station is located about 2 kms from the southern edge of the old town, so be prepared for a 20 minute walk, or take the tram to Steintor or Neuer Markt.

    Rostock can be reached by InterCity trains on the Hamburg – Stralsund route. All other directions, including the route to Berlin, are served by regional and local trains only.

    Central station
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Rostock main railroad station

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 3, 2009

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    The main railroad station in Rostock has been totally modernized and nicely renovated in recent years -- too bad I didn't have a camera with me in 1989 so I could show you what it looked like back then!

    In addition to the many bicycle stands in front of the station -- note that these are good stands that you can easily lock your frame and front wheel to, not the useless rim-killers that you can still find in lots of other places -- there is also an indoor bicycle station with guarded parking and a repair shop.

    Since the front of the station now looks so nice with its tasteful blue and white facade, it's ironic that many people never even see it because the tram lines have been banished underground.

    I have mixed feelings about this. On the one hand, it's convenient to get off your train, take the escalator down two flights and get on your tram (assuming you know which tram to take and in which direction). But putting tram lines underground also has the pernicious side-effect of making more room for automobiles on the surface.

    GPS 54° 4'41.52" North; 12° 7'54.56" East

    Rostock main railroad station
    Related to:
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    • Cycling

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Cycling in Rostock

    by Nemorino Written Jan 30, 2009

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    Like most other cities, Rostock has squandered huge amounts of money to build an overblown road system that generates unnecessary motor traffic and defaces formerly attractive neighborhoods.

    At the same time, though, they have made some sensible investments in upgrading the public transport system, particularly in acquiring a modern new generation of trams aka streetcars.

    And they have even begun to construct a modern network of bicycle routes both within the city and out into the surrounding countryside.

    Bicycle route sign in Rostock
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  • Obak81's Profile Photo

    Rostock Seehafen (port)

    by Obak81 Written Jul 30, 2007

    Rostock Seehafen is a port located outside Rostock. From here you can take ships to Denmark, Sweden and Finland. There is also a trainstation near the port from where you can get to the center of Rostock.

    Rostock Seehafen
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    • Cruise

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  • Strassenbahn

    by Mariajoy Updated Jan 5, 2007

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    Rostock is well served by public transport, although knowing a friendly local with a car is helpful :)

    All the information you need regarding timetables and ticket prices in English and German can be found at the website below.

    Strassenbahn
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  • Obak81's Profile Photo

    "Rostock Seehafen Nord" train station

    by Obak81 Written Sep 26, 2006

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    At one end of the Rostock S-bahn network this station is the exit/entry point for travellers coming from different ferries (inculding Denmark). Train service here is infrequent with 1 train/hour in peak hours.
    A ticket to Rostock Hbf costs round €2.

    The station the station (2) the station(3)
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  • water1's Profile Photo

    Public transportaion

    by water1 Updated Aug 31, 2005

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    Just like any German town it's really easy to move from point A to point B in Rostock.
    all you need to do is to get a 'tageskarte' for 3.5 Euros and you can travel in any of the trams, Buses or in certain boats for next 24 hours. Tickets can be purchased from vending machines, which you can find in almost all the Stations/Stops.

    You need to cancel the ticket before boarding a train/S-Bahn. However cancelling machines are installed in Trams and Buses.

    To go to the beach get an S-Bahn from Rostock Hauptbahnhoff, to Wärnemunde.
    It'll take around 25 minutes to reach Warnemünde from Rostock Central Station.

    There are only 6 tram lines and that makes it clear that Rostock is a place where you're not gonna lost in the traffic.

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  • HyperFredde's Profile Photo

    Take a train

    by HyperFredde Written Dec 11, 2004

    Wondering about how life in the train in the Rostock are is like? Check this out...
    I liked the trains, they were very modern and nice to ride.

    When I travelled (a Friday evening around 9:30 pm) there was not so many people onboard.

    Inside a train
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  • HyperFredde's Profile Photo

    Train station in Rostock

    by HyperFredde Written Dec 11, 2004

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    This is what the train station (Hauptbahnhof)) in Rostock looks like, quite modern actually, not so dirty as train stations usually are.
    You will arrive here if you travel in train to Rostock and it's possible to change trains to tram.

    Train station
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  • Leipzig's Profile Photo

    Getting there

    by Leipzig Updated Feb 7, 2003

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    .
    Getting there by car: Follow Autobahn A 19 till the end and stop before you see water. Traffic is hell in and around Rostock - you really should avoid using a car.

    Getting there by train: Also possible to arrive by train at a beautifully restored station. Public bus service operates in front of the station.

    Getting there by ship: You'll arrive at Warnemünde. Bus service to Rostock operates frequently.

    central station

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  • Mandy23's Profile Photo

    ferry Rostock/Gedser

    by Mandy23 Updated Sep 3, 2002

    We went to Rostock to go from there by ferry 'M/F Prins Joachim' (Scandlines) to Gedser/Denmark and then further to Norway.

    You'll need for that route only 2 hours.

    You can check timetables, prices and book the routes on the Scandlines website at:
    http://www.scandlines.com/

    Scandlines operates 20 passenger and freight ferry lines between Denmark and Germany, Denmark and Sweden, Sweden and Germany, to the Baltic Countries and inside Denmark.

    Some info's about the ferry M/F Prins Joachim:
    Nbr Passengers 2000
    Nbr of cars 200
    Length 152,2 m
    Breadth 23,7 m

    (c) Photo Michael Koefoed-Hansen

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