Stade Things to Do

  • The port in 1841 looked almost the same as today
    The port in 1841 looked almost the same...
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  • Things to Do
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  • Things to Do
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Most Recent Things to Do in Stade

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    Lämmertwiete: Stade's Smallest Street

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 22, 2013

    Lämmertwiete is the smallest street in the old town with a name of its own - it is rather a narrow passage between two houses. It is completely harmless but rather dark and feels a bit creepy... Its width is less than two outstretched arms. The lane is a shortcut from Bächerstraße to Büttelbrücke and "Little Venice".

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    Büttelbrücke: Stade's "Little Venice"

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 22, 2013
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    Every town with water must have a "Little Venice", LOL. Before entering the old port, the river Schwinge runs along a canal through the town. From the bridge in the middle, you have a view to both sides which reveal the houses' back fronts, balconies and gardens known as Klein-Venedig in Stade. I have seen many "Little Venices" in various places and this one qualifies as the most low-key one, LOL. Anyway, It is a nice walk and a convenient shortcut, as the bridge connects Bäckerstraße and Bungenstraße, two side streets with very interesting old houses.

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    Hökerstraße

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 22, 2013
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    Hökerstraße is the main street of the old town. It leads past the town hall and the entrance to the churchyard of St Cosmae slightly downhill to Fischmarkt and the old port.

    "Höker" in North-German dialect is just a neutral word for "merchant". To the rest of the country, though, it has the taste of a slang expression for a cheap or even dubious merchant (the verb "verhökern" means sell for a cheap, too cheap price). Here, however, the name refers to the wealthy and hopefully honest merchants who built their houses along this street, the best address in town. It is still the backbone of Stade's shopping area and has several nice local shops together with some of the usual chains.

    The wealthy merchants have left quite a number of interesting half-timbered houses with ornated facades. The most outstanding of them is the so-called Hökerhus (photo 2 and 4), a late medieval house which survived the fire in 1659 and is one of the few older houses in town. The white timberframe structure is characterisitc for the landscape between Stade and Hamburg. It is now a cafe.

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    The Sundial

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 22, 2013

    Another little discovery behind the church of St Cosmae et Damiani - believe me, it is worth walking round the whole church. A house in the corner of Cosmae-Kirchhof to the street behind has this cute sundial high up on the facade. The sun is half-hidden but twinkling at you - exactly the weather I experienced that day.

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    Former Synagoge

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 22, 2013
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    Easily overlooked: A small half-timbered house in the corner behind the church of St Cosmae et Damiani. It has been well restored and served as a residential house now. A plaque on the wall tells that this was the former synagogue of the Jewish community in Stade.

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    Church of St Cosmae: The Huß/Schnitger Organ

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 22, 2013
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    The church's greatest pride is their organ. The magnificent instrument fills the whole Western wall of the nave. It was designed and begun by the master organ builder Berendt Huß from Glückstadt in 1668. His assistant and cousin Arp Schnitger, who later became a master organ builder much more famous than his teacher and mentor, took an important part in the completion. In 1675 the organ was completed. During the following years Schnitger added some more features. After several repairs, changes and renovations the organ has recently been restored to its original shape and sound.

    The three gilded statues on top symbolize the Christian virtues of Faith, Love and Hope.

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    Church of St Cosmae: The Votive Ship

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 22, 2013

    Model ships can be found in many churches along the coast. They are reminders to remember and pray for the seafaring members of the community, and at the same time a symbol of the Christian community in general. They are usually private donations, often from sailors as sign of gratitude for rescue and protection. This one here, though, is rather young, it was created in 1960 and came into the church only in 1998, and it is a donation of the local savings bank. Well they can do with prayers, too...

    The ship in St Cosmae is a four-masted tall ship named Hoffnung, hope.The best spot to see it is from the gallery in the Southern transept - pretend to be interested in the exhibition which is shown up there.

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    Church of St Cosmae: Interior

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 22, 2013
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    The whole medieval interior was destroyed in the fire of 1659, all the present interior except one chandelier dates from the baroque era. The parish community hired the best artisans from Hamburg and other surrounding towns to create a worthy environment for their worship. Note the details of the pulpit, a masterrpiece of woodcarving, its many figures are a summary of the Bible in best Lutheran tradition. The main altar (1674-1677 by the sculptor Christian Precht from Hamburg) may resemble Catholic altars but its scenes of the Passion and resurrection of Christ tell once more of Lutheran theology. Several galleries and boxes were installed to separate social groups and provide special seats for the town's V.I.P.'s. The brass chandeliers are a common feature in North German churches.

    One single medieval piece is on display in the church: the altarpiece of St Gertrud, around 1500, which originally belonged to the church of St Nicolai. After the demolition of said church in the 19th century it was brought here and found its place in the chapel by the Southern transept.

    On the gallery in the Southern transept they had an exhibition about orthodox icons when I visited. This area seems to be used for exhibitions regularly. It is worth going up, even if you are not interested in the exhibition, for the view down into the church and a closer look at the votive ship.

    From mid March to the end of October the church is open daily: Monday to Saturday 10:00 - 17:00, Sunday from after the morning service (about 11:30) to 17:00.

    The church's pride and joy is of course the magnificent organ, which deserves a separate tip.

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    Church of St Cosmae et Damiani

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 22, 2013
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    Short "St Cosmae", this brick gothic church is the oldest parish church of the town, and the most impressive. The first church here was already built in the 9th/10th century. The present church's nave dates from around 1250. Soon after it was extended by the transept and chour. Its most striking feature is the majestic tower above the intersection of nave and transept. The fire of 1659 damaged the church, which was repaired soon after. The baroque spire is an addition of the 1680s.

    From mid March to the end of October the church is open daily: Monday to Saturday 10:00 - 17:00, Sunday from after the morning service (about 11:30) to 17:00.
    About the interior, see separate tips.

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    Model of Old Stade in the Town Hall

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 21, 2013
    The model
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    The entrance hall of the town hall hosts a large model of old Stade in a showcase underneath the stairs, opposite the main entrance. It shows Stade the way it was before the big fire of 1659 that devastated two thirds of the town. The church of St Wilhadi still has its pointed spire. In the location of the arsenal in Pferdemarkt you can spot the ruins of the convent of St Georg, abandoned since the reformation. The fortifications consist of wall and moat, the huge ramparts were built about a century later. The ground plan and outline, including the port and its surroundings, have not changed much.

    The door of the town hall is open during the usual office hours on weekdays and I assume that this model is meant to be looked at, so it should be okay to just walk in and see it.

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    Town Hall

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 21, 2013
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    Stade's town hall is a renaissance building, erected after the destruction of its precedessor in the big townwide fire of 1659. Wrought-iron anchors on the facade display the date 1667. The town hall is built from bricks, with whiteish sandstone ornaments and window frames, and resembles Dutch renaissance architecture. The sculpted portal shows the coat of arms of King Karl XI of Sweden, the then governor of the town.
    Since a modern administration needs more room, a new town hall has been built beside the old one.

    I could not resist the open door and poked my nose in; no idea if I was supposed to or not, but a town hall is a public building after all. The entrance hall on the ground floor is dominated by the wooden staircase in the middle. Wooden doors, rather early baroque than renaissance, lead into the offices and whatnot. The main hall on the upper floor was unfortunately closed.
    The most interesting feature was the model of the old town underneath the staircase (see separate tip).

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    Monastery of St Johannis

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 21, 2013
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    The former Franciscan monastery of St Johannis was closed down after the Reformation and became a hospital for poor people. Since the big fire of 1659 the church is gone, only the convent building was repaired as a plain half-timbered structure. Nowadays they host the offices of several social and cultural institutions. The modern town archive has been built next-door in the place where the church once used to be. In the courtyard in between, an "archeological garden" shows the ground plan of the basilica. Due to construction works in the street I could not enter the courtyard but that should be over soon. The building complex is surrounded by a rose garden in the South and a little park with old trees.

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    Spiegelberg

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 16, 2013
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    Spiegelberg is an artificial hill by the port and river. It was created in the early middle ages, probably around 900, to build a small castle on top. The castle is long gone. Nowadays it is a residential quarter with a handful of historical half-timbered houses. The general appearance is a bit run down. From the footpath in the back you have a view of the new port (photos 3 and 4) and the church of St Wilhadi.

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    Fischmarkt and Waage

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 16, 2013
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    Fischmarkt is the old market square by the port, where not only fish was traded but most goods which were unloaded from the ships here. The half-timbered building in the middle of the square is the scale where all arriving goods were weighed, controlled and taxed before merchants got the okay to put them on sale.

    Nowadays there are several restaurants and cafes with outdoor seating around Fischmarkt - weather permitting, a nice spot for a lunch, coffee or dinner break.

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    The Fish Merchant Woman

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 16, 2013
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    The sculpture by the port depicts a woman selling fish. She proudly presents the largest catch of the day to all passers-by and potential customers. Note the cat who is clearly interested in stealing from the contents of her basket...

    The stature (1986) had a real model, a woman nicknamed "Mutter Flint mit dem Stint" who used to sell fish by the port before and after World War II.

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