Römisch-Germanisches Museum, Cologne

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  • Römisch-Germanisches Museum
    by croisbeauty
  • Romisch-Germanisches Museum
    Romisch-Germanisches Museum
    by croisbeauty
  • Römisch-Germanisches Museum
    by croisbeauty
  • carrie.kindred's Profile Photo

    Roman/Germanic Museum

    by carrie.kindred Updated Apr 6, 2012

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    Explore the past at the Roman/Germanic Museum. This museum houses an impressive collection of Roman artifacts ranging from dinnerware to weaponry, and everything in between. There are statues, tile mosaics, road markers and jewelry... It's hard to think of something that can't be found there. My favorite exhibit showed a reconstruction of a Roman room -- there was a massive floor mosaic, and reconstructed frescoes with original bits of the painting. Most of the exhibit descriptions are given in both German and English.

    I'd recommend this museum for just about everyone. Older children (ten and up, perhaps?) would even be able to appreciate the artifacts here.

    Admission is 8euro per adult, and large bags MUST be checked at the front desk for a fifty cent fee. No photography permitted.

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    The Roman - Germanic Museum

    by croisbeauty Updated Nov 22, 2011

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    Romisch-Germanisches Museum
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    The Roman - Germanic Museum was open in 1975 and is situated right next to the Cathedral. It has large collection of Roman artifacts from the Roman settlement Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, on which today's town is built. Inside the museum is original site of a Roman villa, discovered in 1941., from which a large Dyonisus mosaic remains. It also preserves extensive collection of Roman glass from funerals and burials.

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    COLONIA CLAUDIA ARA AGRIPPINENSIUM

    by Steve-H Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Reconstructed roman temple
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    COLONIA CLAUDIA ARA AGRIPPINENSIUM (the Roman name of Cologne).
    I really wanted to see this exhibition but the museum is closed on Mondays.
    The Römisch-Germanisches Museum in Cologne emerged from the Roman and Germanic department of the Wallraf-Richartz Museum in 1946. The present building was opened in 1974 and is situated in the immediate vicinity of the cathedral. It was built on the walls of a Roman villa which was discovered in 1941 and which contained the world-famous Dionysos mosaic. The mediaeval Kaiserpfalz (imperial palace) also stood on this site. The museum houses the department of archaeological excavations and monuments of Cologne city council and fulfils three different functions as a centre of research, the archaeological archives of the City of Cologne and the public collection.
    The presentation concept of the permanent exhibition has aroused international interest and has made the Römisch-Germanisches Museum one of the most popular museums in Germany.
    Fragments of Roman architecture, inscriptions, portraits of, amongst others, Emperor Augustus and his wife Livia, ceramics and a great deal more provide visitors with an insight into the urban development of Roman Cologne from a major settlement of the Germanic tribe of the Ubii to a city under Roman legislation and capital of the Imperial province of Lower Germania. Mosaics and mural painting are evidence of the rich decoration of the houses. The various religious cults which are of Italic, Oriental and local origin come alive in the depiction of deities in stone, bronze and clay. Prehistoric finds from Cologne, the Rhineland and selected European sites dating from the Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages are also exhibited.
    The Roman mosaic with scenes from the world of Dionysos (around 220/230 A.D.) and the reconstructed tomb of the legionary Poblicius (around 40 A.D.) are probably the best known exhibits of the Römisch-Germanisches Museum in Cologne. The museum's collection has profited from the archaeological legacy of Cologne and the surrounding region which spans a period from prehistoric times to the early Middle Ages. The worldwide largest collection of Roman glass vessels and a unique collection of Roman and early mediaeval jewellery are the highlights of this museum.
    There are some interestin displayed out side of the museum too, fragments of Roman buildings etc are on show in glass cases along the pavement.

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  • BillNJ's Profile Photo

    Visit the Römisch-Germanisches Museum

    by BillNJ Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Römisch-Germanisches Museum is near the Cathedral. Inside, the Roman mosaic with scenes from the world of Dionysos (around 220/230 A.D.) and the reconstructed tomb of the legionary Poblicius (around 40 A.D.) are probably the best known exhibits. There are also many other interesting artefacts and presentations.

    With the Köln WelcomeCard, you receive a 20% discount off of the admission price.

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  • garridogal's Profile Photo

    Beautiful Roman Artifacts

    by garridogal Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Gorgeous glass
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    It's your basic artifact museum with relics of the many ancient eras - particularly the Roman - of the Cologne area, beautifully displayed. The collection of glass artifacts are especially well preserved too and well lit. And the museum has lots of windows which allow the natural light to stream in for many a good photo op!

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Römisch-Germanisches Museum

    by Sjalen Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Cologne gets its name from the Romans who called it Colonia (these days epithomised in a classic carneval song) and as one of Germany's oldest cities they founded it. Therefore, it is no more than right that this is where a Roman museum should be housed which includes Roman finds from all over this part of Germany. Apart from its permanent collection, there are also exhibitions on various Roman things. During our visit it was about the importance of Colosseum. If you are in a hurry to the train but still want to see something, you can just look down the huge glass window in the cathedral square and you will see the nice mosaic floor that is one of the museum's great showpieces.

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  • benidormone's Profile Photo

    Romano-Germanic Museum

    by benidormone Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Romano-Germanic Museum

    The Romano-Germanic Museum is really worthwhile to visit. It has a big collection of mosaic floors, statues etc. All of this is found in the region of Cologne. It has a unique collection of Roman and early mediaeval jewellery.

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    Roman-Germanic Museum Mosaic

    by sandysmith Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    mosaic detail

    Another feature of the Roman-Germanic Museum you can see without actually entering is the Dionysos Mosaic floor - a delightful pagan Roman tribute to Bacchannlain pleasure. VViewable from a glass window near the fron tentrance. Roman glass vessels and a unique collection of Roman and early mediaeval jewellery are other highlights of this museum.

    Open Tuesday to Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

    Admission
    EUR 4,30 / reduced EUR 2,70

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  • jackfruit's Profile Photo

    Romisch-Germanisches Museum

    by jackfruit Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Roman-German Museum - Pic Courtesy museenkoeln.de

    Dedicated to Koln's Roman past, this museum boasts artifacts like Roman jewelery, mosaics and other crafts.
    It was closed when I visited, but looking through the glass window on the front, I took in the fine mosaic floor that this museum is famous for.

    The mosaic floor was once part of a rich merchant's house (dining room) and was later used as the grounds for building the Roman-German Museum.

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Definitely The Logical Place To Build It!

    by johngayton Updated Feb 20, 2011

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    The Dyonysian Mosaic
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    Cologne's emergence as a city was due to the Romans. In 38 BC (would that be XXXVIII or XIIL??) a Roman garrison was stationed there due to its strategic position on the Rhine. By 50 AD this had grown into quite a considerable town and was given city status and renamed Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium (Colony of Claudius and Altar of the Agrippiner).

    By the turn of the first century AD the population had grown to about 45,000 and the city was the largest Roman colony north of the Alps.

    This of course has left a rich archeological heritage and one of the most stunning finds was the Dyonysian Mosiac which was discovered in 1941 during the building of a World War II air raid shelter. This richly detailed mosaic was the floor of the main room of a fairly substantial Roman villa, other remains of which were subsequently uncovered.

    Despite being wartime, work on the air raid shelter was suspended and measures taken to preserve the mosaic. During the post-war reconstruction of the city the mosaic was left in place and what is now the Romano-Germanic museum was built around it, using it as the centrepiece of the basement level. The present museum building was completed in 1974 and the lower exhibition rooms are built according to the layout of the original villa.

    As well as the mosaic the museum exhibits depict how life would have been during Roman occupation and has considerable collections of artworks and artefacts from the period including what is probably the largest collection of Roman glassware in the World.

    The museum is open Tuesday to Sunday from 10 am until 5 pm and the present entrance fee (Sept 2010) is 8 Euros. I'm not sure whether photography is allowed in the museum and I didn't see anyone else obviously taking any but I snuck a couple of discreet ones.

    If you don't want to pay the entry fee there is an external display of various bits and bobs on the wall at the back of the building.

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    Römisch-Germanisches Museum

    by Nemorino Written Nov 25, 2009

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    R��misch-Germanisches Museum

    The Romano-Germanic Museum, which is right next to the Cathedral, features a Roman mosaic with scenes from the world of Dionysus (around 220/230 A.D.) and the reconstructed tomb of the wealthy Roman legionary Lucius Poblicius from around 40 A.D.

    The current building was opened in 1974. It was built on the walls of a Roman villa which was only discovered in 1941 and which contained the Dionysus mosaic that is now on display.

    Aside from their permanent exhibition on Roman and Medieval archeology they also present temporary exhibitions on all sorts of topics, for instance in 2009 they were advertising an exhibit on “A fine Holy Night! -- Christmas in political propaganda" documenting "the abuse of Christmas for political propaganda" in 20th century Germany, especially (but not only) in the Nazi period.

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    Römisch-Germanisches Museum

    by Kathrin_E Written Oct 4, 2009

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    R��misch-Germanisches Museum

    Cologne’s history begins more than 2000 years ago. When Julius Caesar crossed the Rhine around 50 B.C. a thriving settlement of the Germanic Ubier was already there. In 50 A.D. the settlement received the rights and status of a Roman city and the name Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium. Archeological finds of the ancient Romans and Germans are on display in Römisch-Germanisches Museum, located next to the cathedral. If you are interested in archaeology and ancient history, this museum is a must.

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  • MacedonianUK's Profile Photo

    Historin on your fingertips

    by MacedonianUK Written Apr 12, 2009

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    I love Roman-Gremanic Museum next to the Dome.
    Everybody comes for the Dome, and the Museum is littlebit overseen, but it has lots to offer. Worth spending few hours looking trought
    This particular area has long history, specilay Roman & Gremanic period and many tresures are displayed in the Museum. In the summer months, the back of the MUseum leads towards the quy of the Rihn and its full of young people sitting listening to an Calsical music organised by the museum.

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    German-Roman Museum

    by leafmcgowan Written Apr 6, 2009

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    In the heart of the city center right to the side of the Cologne Cathedral, lies Cologne's German/Roman Museum. The Roman-Germanic Museum (RGM, in German: Römisch-Germanisches Museum) is one of the better archaeological museums in the region. This museum houses and protects a humongous collection of Roman artifacts from the Roman settlement Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, on which modern Cologne is built. The museum is also an archaeological site as it also protects the original place of a Roman town villa, down in the basement, of which the large Dionysus Mosaic remains in its original place and the related Roman Road just outside. Within the museum is an institution to preserve the Cologne Roman cultural heritage, and therefore preserves wonderful Roman glass from Roman funerals and burial. This archaeological function also includes the supervision of the Cologne underground, which is now under construction.
    Most of the museum's collection was formerly housed at the Wallraf-Richartz Museum in Cologne until 1946. In the front of the museum the former northern town gate of Cologne with the inscription CCAA (for Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium) is shown. The museum was completed in 1974 near the Cologne Cathedral at the place of a 3rd century villa. The villa was discovered in 1941 during the construction of an air-raid shelter. In its main room there was the Dionysusmosaic. Since the mosaic could not be moved easily, the architects Klaus Renner and Heinz Röcke designed a museum around the mosaic. The museum's inner courtyards mimic the ancient villa's layout. As well as the 220/230 AD Dionysusmosaic, the museum houses a reconstructed sepulcher of the 40 AD legionnaire Poblicius. Home to the world's largest collection of Roman glasses as well as an outstanding collection of Roman and medieval jewellery, the collection also consists of everyday Roman life implements, household items, pieces of architecture, portraits, inscriptions and pottery. Each year that I've come to visit Cologne, this is a definite must-stop for me as the collection is amazing. Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.

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    The Romano-Germanic Museum

    by Tom_Fields Written Mar 14, 2009

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    The Romano-Germanic Museum
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    Cologne stood on the northern frontier of the Roman Empire. Once, the Romans ventured across the Rhine River into the wild territory beyond. Germanic tribes ambushed and nearly annhilated them in the Battle of the Teutoberg Forest. From that point on, the Romans stayed mainly on the west side of the river. Cologne and Trier (see my tips on Trier) made up part of the Empire's northern border.

    The Roman Museum contains many priceless artifacts from that historic period. One of the best-known is an original mosaic depicting scenes from the life of the god Dionysis. The museum also contains many items from the medieval period. A must-see for historians.

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