Old Town - Altstadt, Düsseldorf

4.5 out of 5 stars 61 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Old Town - Altstadt
    by mirchica
  • Old Town - Altstadt
    by mirchica
  • The musician
    The musician
    by mirchica
  • leics's Profile Photo

    Neanderkirche

    by leics Written Jun 20, 2015

    The Neanderkirche as consecrated in 1687, around the same time as the Bergerkirche and, like that church, was built set back from the road in the courtyard area of an already-existing building. At that time Lutheran and Evangelical Protestants were only barely tolerated and their churches were not allowed to have any prominence.

    the houses which once blocked the view of the church were destroyed during the Second World War bombings, which is why it is now so much more visible than the Bergerkirche.

    The church is Baroque in style but in a restrained form (again, because of the restrictions at the time it was built). Unfortunately it wasn't open when I visited so I couldn't see its interior; i suspect it is only open for services. The church website below has a good photo.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Bergerkirche

    by leics Written Jun 19, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It would be very easy indeed to miss the Bergerkirche. It really is hidden away in Duesseldorf's Altstadt.

    It's a pretty old building, dating from 1683 and consecrated in 1687, though, like most in the Altstadt, it suffered severe damage in the Second World War. In fact, the building was pretty-much destroyed. What you see now mostly dates from reconstructions in the 1960s but the church had not been used for services since 1901 anyway. Since 2003 it has been a centre for the charitable organisation, Diaconia.

    Why was the original church so tucked-away? Simply because, at the time it was first built, Lutherans were tolerated and no more than that. So their church was allowed to be built but was certainly not to be in any way prominent.

    The external appearance, although reconstructed, is pretty much as it would have been. The church is, in effect, just one large room.The original interior was Baroque in style but in 2003 it was redesigned by Frankfurt artist Tobias Rehberger. I could only have a glimpse of the interior through the open door because a talk was being held inside.

    Building in church courtyard
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Religious Travel
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Johanneskirche

    by leics Written Jun 19, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The tall spire of the Johanneskirche in Martin-Luther-Platz caught my eye on my first wander into Duesseldorf's old town and it was, of course, inevitable that I paid a visit.

    It's a brick church, originally built between 1875 and 1881. The spire is 88 metres (288 feet) high and really does tower over the surrounding buildings. Johanneskirche is the largest Protestant church in the city.

    Like much of Duesseldorf's Altstadt, the church was very badly damaged by bombing during the Second world War. It wasn't re-opened until 1953 and, i've since found out, underwent substantial renovation and change in 2008. which explain why, when I walked in, I was so astonished to fins:

    1. A busy cafe and art exhibition area in the 'entrance'. 'Kaffee und kuchen', newspapers, chat with friends, a warm place to sit and relax or read as well as paintings and sculptures to enjoy.

    2. Rather attractive, and very modern, internal architecture in the prayer-and-worship part of the church, with lots of plain wood and modern glass. I don't usually like modern architecture at all but I felt this really worked very well indeed. The glass-and-metal pulpit is particularly attractive.

    I particularly liked the phrase 'Brought forth by the resonance of a dissonance. Sealing in.', a quote from (I think) artist Lawrence Weiner. It appears in both German and English on the edge of the gallery and seems particularly appropriate for this church, almost destroyed in war yet now brought almost completely into modernity.

    Outside the church there are two old stone angels, one of which has been 'beheaded'. I imagine they were part of the original church architecture, almost certainly set near the spire. I was pleased to see that they had been preserved.

    Cafe area Angels outside
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Altstadt architecture

    by leics Updated Jun 19, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Do bear in mind that Duesseldorf was bombed during the Second World War and, in common with many German cities, its Altstadt (old town) was severely damaged. A great deal of what might, at first sight, appear 'old' has been rebuilt or reconstructed since the war ended. Unlike the UK (where, I'm sad to say, 'modernity' and concrete too often reigned supreme in our post-war reconstruction) German post-war rebuilding often set out to recreate what had existed before the war began.

    But whether the buildings you see in the Altstadt are truly in their complete and original condition really doesn't matter. Just enjoy wandering and spotting the area's older architecture, recreated or not. There isn't a huge amount of older buildings but there are some nice 'twiddly' 18th and 19th century ones, some earlier ones (15th and 16th century, tall and narrow with very steep gables) as well as some older churches (see separate tips).

    The carillon in the main photo is on Marktstrasse, by the way. I haven't been able to find any information about when, or even if, it chimes.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Enjoy the modern sculptures......

    by leics Written Jun 16, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are lots of sculptures and bits of artwork dotted about both Duesseldorf's Altstadt and the area immediately surrounding it. It's worth keeping your eyes open as you wander around.

    1. The main photo is 'Conflict', an arresting pair of bronze humans standing at the junction of Mittelstrasse and Grabenstrasse. They were created by Karl Henning Seemann and date from the late 1970s.

    Photo 2. Duesseldorf is famous for its cartwheelers, its oldest tradition and a symbol of the city. The Radschlägerbrunnen is in Burgplatz...two little boys having a great deal of fun cartwheeling. It dates from 1954. Sculptor Alfred Zschorsch.

    Photo 3: Jan Wellem (Johann Wilhelm II, Elector Palatine), on his horse in front of the Rathaus in Marktplatz. Dating from 1711, the rather self-satisfied Jan Wellem and his horse were created by Gabriel de Grupello but stand on a base made by Adolf von Vagedes in 1830.

    Photo 4: The weathervane man. I've no idea why he's up there on the rooftops of Grabenstrasse but he swirls and whirls most agreeably. :-)

    Photo 5: Look at the advertising cylinder on the right. I saw several of these dotted around the city, each one with a different (life-sized) human figure or group of figures.

    There are lots more sculptures to find, of course......

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Family Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    K20 Kunstsammlung NRW

    by antistar Updated Jun 30, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A work of architectural art in itself, the K20 Kunstsammlung NRW also contains a large collection of artwork of its own. Starting in 1960 the state government bought a collection by the painter Paul Klee, and added to that a great number of post-war works, including examples from Abstract Expressionism and Cubism. There are also plenty of other pieces of art in the collection, and not just post-war, like Bauhaus, Dadaist and Surrealist works. Along with Klee there are works from the likes of Matisse, Picasso and Pollock. The collection is also augmented by numerous special exhibitions, such as Rebecca Horn's Bodylandscapes when I visited.

    Opening Times

    Tue-Sun 10am-6pm
    On weekends opens an hour later in the morning, and on Wednesdays it closes later at 10pm.

    Entry: €6.50 adults (free after 6pm on Wednesdays).

    The K20 is twinned with the K21 art collection across the other side of town and you can buy a kombi-ticket that gives entry to both for €10.

    K20 Kunstsammlung NRW, Dusseldorf

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Wilhelm-Marx-Haus

    by antistar Updated Jun 30, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What most distinguished this building for me was the large neon Persil sign on Grabenstr. side of the tower. It made it look like something straight out of Time Square in New York, only in miniature. That was likely the intention when it was built, being one of the first (if not the first) multi-storey office towers in Germany. According to the German press at the time it was built, the tower was, at 57 meters and 13 floors, the largest reinforced concrete building in Europe.

    Wilhelm-Marx-Haus, Dusseldorf

    Was this review helpful?

  • mirchica's Profile Photo

    Burgplatz

    by mirchica Updated Jul 4, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a square in the heart of Dusseldorf. Years ago there have been a castle there, that’s why is has that name too - Castle Keep. Now it is a very pleasant place for walking and chilling, the river Rhein passes nearby. The Maritime Museum is situated there.
    Last time there was a musician with a grand piano, playing nice classical music. People around were applauding after every song and a dog was barking in harmony with the them.

    The musician
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • St Lambertus

    by Mariajoy Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This beautiful Medieval church in the old town, built in 1288 is the oldest building in the city - the slightly twisted steeple was an accident caused by builders using damp timbers! Unfortunately I didn't have time to go inside!

    St Lambertus Church

    Was this review helpful?

  • Schloßturm on Burgplatz

    by Mariajoy Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Until 1882 there was a castle here - but it burnt down and all that remains is the castle tower (Schloßturm). It is now a multimedia museum called "Leben am Strom" (Life on the river) and there is also a cafe at the top where you can enjoy a coffee while watching the river roll by.

    Schlo��turm and church

    Was this review helpful?

  • mirchica's Profile Photo

    Go to Altstadt

    by mirchica Updated Jan 10, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is the old area of Dusseldorf. It is really interesting with its streets and buildings. Some streets are full with shops, some with restaurants. It is told that there is situated “the longest bar on the world” because of so many bars and restaurants along the streets.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Heine House

    by Nemorino Updated Mar 20, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Photos:
    1. Bookshop and literary café in the Heine House
    2. In the bookshop

    This is where the author Heinrich Heine was born in 1797 -- not in this house but at this address.

    In one of his early books Heine imagined that some day "elegant English women with green veils" would generously tip the maid in his birth house so she would show them "the room where I first saw the light of day and the corner of the henhouse where my father used to lock me up when he caught me eating grapes, and also the brown door upon which my mother taught me to write the letters of the alphabet with chalk -- oh God, Madame, if I become a famous writer it will certainly have cost my poor mother enough toil."

    He addressed this entire book, Das Buch Le Grand (1827), to this mysterious "Madame".

    Speaking of Düsseldorf, he said: "Yes, Madame, I was born there, and I note this explicitly just in case it should happen, by any chance, that after my death seven cities -- Schilda, Krähwinkel, Polkwitz, Bokum, Dülken, Göttingen and Schöppenstädt -- all vie for the honor of being my birthplace."

    1. Bookshop and literary caf�� in the Heine House 2. In the bookshop
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • BillNJ's Profile Photo

    Visit Die Altstadt (the Old Town)

    by BillNJ Updated May 30, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Düsseldorfer Altstadt is known as the longest bar in the world because this small area of the city contains over 300 bars, pubs, and nightclubs. VTers Sabs and Thomas gave me a tour of the area during the daytime when it is much less crowded. In addition to the nightlife, the Altstadt also has some notable landmarks including the Basilica St. Lambertus and the old Rathaus (city hall). There are also some residences with interesting ornamentation like the one in the photo.

    Was this review helpful?

  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Braurerei Uerige

    by richiecdisc Updated Jan 15, 2008

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This century old masterpiece may have been destroyed during WWII but its re-creation must be the city's crowning achievement. With lots of adjoining rooms and one indoor area that resembles a beer garden this place oozes tradition and one can't help feel a part of another era just sitting here watching the waiters bustle by. The world renowned alt bier is is dispensed from wooden casks with brass taps on display in the main pub of the sprawling complex. If there is one thing you cannot miss in Düsseldorf, this is it

    what century is this anyway?
    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • DanielF's Profile Photo

    Old Jesuit Church

    by DanielF Updated Aug 9, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is the most beautiful Barroque church in Düsseldorf. It was modelled after the typical churches of Bavaria. for this reason, it looks a bit out of place in this Rhineland city with Prussian influence.

    The church is also known as Saint Andrew's.

    Jan-Willem, that guy who let erect a statue in his own honour on the Marquet Square, is buried here with his vanity as only companion for eternity.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Düsseldorf

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

15 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Old Town - Altstadt
3.5 out of 5 stars
1 Review
0 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
0 miles away
Show Prices
5.0 out of 5 stars
0.1 miles away
Show Prices

View all Düsseldorf hotels