Duisburg Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by ettiewyn
  • Things to Do
    by ettiewyn
  • Things to Do
    by ettiewyn

Most Recent Things to Do in Duisburg

  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    Enjoy a night at the opera!

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Aug 12, 2011

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    Not many people would associate Duisburg with culture, but like many heavily industrialised cities, captains of industry have invested significantly in developing cultural attractions such as theatres and museums in an attempt to 'rehabilitate' the grimy reputation of the city.

    Duisburg's Opera House is one of the two homes of the world-renowned Deutsche Oper am Rhein (a distinction that it shares with its neighbour Duesseldorf).

    The theatre is a striking building with a dazzlingly white classical facade: the theatre originally dates from 1912, but was reconstructed in 1950 (presumably to repair war damage). It is located within easy walking distance of the Koenigstrasse pedestrian precinct, to which it is linked by a long, attractive lawn.

    The website below contains a link to the programme of events at the Opera House (unfortunately only in German, but it shouldn't be too much of a stretch for culture vultures to work out).

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    Explore the Landschaftspark Duisburg-Nord

    by BillNJ Written Jun 1, 2008

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    The Landschaftspark Duisburg-Nord is a massive former industrial site that has been turned into a park. The park was designed in 1991 by Peter Latz with the intention that German society understand and appreciate its industrial past, rather than reject it. Admission to the park is free to the public. Or, if preferred, tourists can take one of the guided tours offered by the park for a fee.

    The basis of the park is a a coal and steel production plant that was abandoned in 1985, leaving the area significantly polluted. In designing the park, Peter Latz attempted to preserve as much of the existing site as possible. The concept of memory was central to his design. The site was designed with the idea that a grandfather, who might have worked at the plant, could walk with his grandchildren, explaining what he used to do and for what the machinery had been used.

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    Mercator Monument

    by Sjalen Written Sep 24, 2007

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    Mercator

    Outside the City Hall stands this fountain and statue of Gerardus Mercator (or Gheert Cremer as his birth name was before he latinised it), the city's most famous inhabitant to this day. Born in 1512 in the Flemish part of today's Belgium, which was then a part of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, Mercator moved to Duisburg in 1552 as he could express his view of the World better in the more tolderant Ruhr city than back home (his parents also came from the Ruhr area so he knew it well) and he could teach at a new college there. Mercator had been convicted of heresy and sent to prison in 1544 because of his many travels and Protestant views so no wonder he might have felt ready to leave...

    Originally Mercator was known for making mathematical instruments and he was a very good brass engraver which is what led him into map making. Soon he was not just engraving but actually exploring himself, and creating maps. The most famous of course being the Mercator Chart which revolutionised naval charts as it became much easier to navigate with the new straight lines. This really revolutionised shipping, and on top of that we can thank the travelling Mercator for being the one who first called an Atlas an Atlas even if he himself never travelled again after moving to Duisburg.

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    • Sailing and Boating
    • Historical Travel

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    City Hall

    by Sjalen Updated Sep 24, 2007

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    The City Hall is a definate landmark as you approach Altstadt, where its tower is seen next to that of the Salvator Church. The building you see today is from 1843 which is not that hard to guess when you have a close look at the Romance style of it. It was built in answer to the constant growth of Duisburg in the 19th century, although there has been a town hall in this place since 1566. Before then, it was the site of the Palatinate Burg as given away by its address.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    City walls

    by Sjalen Updated Sep 21, 2007

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    Duisburg's city walls are of course in no way as impressive as Tallinn or York and other classics but still manages to give a feel for what the city must once have been like - especially if you also see the city models in the museum (see tip). Not that much survives but here is the bit near the inner harbour. The oldest part of it is just beyond Dellplatz.

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    Landschaftspark Nord

    by Sjalen Updated Sep 21, 2007

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    The reason we had a VT meeting in Duisburg was because Sabsi, lover of things industrial and harbour-side, wanted to show us the Landschaftspark. Plenty of former industrial sites in the Ruhr area have been turned into cultural or recreational sites but this must be one of the most fascinating simply because of the way it has been left alone, giving it a natural feel amidst all the stacks and chimneys, but also because of the variety of things to do here. I had high expectations and was not disappointed as this place really is wonderful. You can walk around what is a closed down steel factory and it has been left the way it was instead of arranged into something else, so you get to take amazing photos of factory taken over by trees, and huge structures which you can also climb for great views of the whole grounds and more marvellous photography. Have a look at my travelogues below and you will see what I mean. The whole place has also been taken over more and more by trees and this gives it all a wild look, as if nature triumphs over man. Parts of it is used for Duisburg's climbers (see sport tip) and it is amazing to see people with full climbing gear in the middle of a factory. There is also a great slide for children, bike paths and a stable as well as a bar with crap service but good beer, and a snack bar. In the old factory gasworks you can go diving and well, there is just so much.

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    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Life Saver

    by Sjalen Written Sep 21, 2007

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    Life Saver

    The giant sculpture people either hate or love, Life Saver was created by Niki de Saint-Phalle in 1991 and stands in a fountain. Personally, I love it as reminds me of my Stockholm childhood which was full of similar painted polyester art. I also think it is placed in an excellent position in quite a grey part of the city centre which is cheered up considerably by the colours of this giant bird with its fascinating talons.

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Wilhelm Lehmbruck-Museum

    by Sjalen Written Sep 20, 2007

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    Wilhelm Lehmbruck, 1881-1919, was a local sculptor who sadly committed suicide at the age of 38, but left a treasure of art, some of which is on display here along with other sculptures from his time as well as later and which has given the museum its sub title of Centre for European Sculpture. There are also several rooms with paintings which are mainly by contemporary German artists, and a collection of photos of sculptures. If you have children, they might also enjoy the interactive "kids' area". We had no time to venture inside but there are plenty of sculptures in the Immanuel Kant Park just outside the museum too - some I just never got but the one in this picture was my style.

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    Kultur- und Stadthistorisches Museum

    by Sjalen Written Sep 20, 2007

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    The city's history museum pulled us in because of its star attraction: the maps and globes of famous cartographer Mercator. Born in what is today Belgium, Mercator moved to Duisburg early on as it was more tolerant and allowed him to produce scientific images of the world without too much questioning by the church. Today the museum shows his two famous globes, one including astrological symbols, as well as plenty of maps. There are also maps by his competitors and followers. Downstairs, the museum shows the history of Duisburg which is more fascinating than you think and every section has at least some text in English so you can read up on the history of Frankish tribes by the Ruhr as well as coal mining. There is also a small but interesting section on Duisburg during WWII. Finally, there are some models of the city throughout time so you can see how it has grown from a small Frankish settlement to a major German city.

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    Salvator Church

    by Sjalen Written Sep 20, 2007

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    Built in the 14th century, on the site of an earlier church, the Salvator Church is one of the few remaining old sights of the Altstadt and easy to spot as you walk down the river. It is a late Gothic building and once had one of the highest towers in western Germany, most likely paid for by affluent citizens. I was not that impressed with its rather clean interior, but then again it has been rebuilt after heavy bombing during WWII (which you can still see on the top of the tower - it lost its tall spire) and only reopened for services in the 1960s. The most famous sight inside the church is the tomb of famous map-constructor Mercator. The site below includes a calendar for concerts if you are into music.

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    • Religious Travel
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    Duisburg - Rheinhafen

    by gubbi1 Updated Apr 1, 2007

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    Duisburg - Rheinhafen
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    Take a walk along the promenade of Duisburgs Rheinhafen recreational area. There are some pubs / cafes, so you can have a nice and enjoyable time. For kids there are toys using the water from the harbour bassin.

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    Landschaftspark Nord

    by marlowe1975 Written Jan 28, 2007
    Look from Furnace No.5
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    If you are looking for industrial relics, monuments of workplaces,
    the Duisburg-Nord Country Park is all you need.
    At a site where the blast furnace heat was almost unbearable you can now cool down and relax.
    Young trees and old furnaces overlook a park for everybody and everything
    - and even more, as you can simply climb to the roof of the Ruhr and enjoy the view,
    experience top events live in a factory building or track regional history in a world of steel.
    The steel quota desicions of the European Community whre the reason why the furnace was shut
    down omn April 4 1985 after 82 years of service.
    So Blast furnace No.5 renained ready to reactivate. Following massive protests the plant
    was not demolished and protectet as an industrial monument.
    The Park is open around the clock. Try it also at night, its amazing !!
    No admission is charge
    www.landschaftspark.de

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • belgianchocolate's Profile Photo

    Duisburg zoo - favorite exhibit

    by belgianchocolate Updated Jul 14, 2003
    raccoons

    Tell me fairly , witch animals did you expect to see here...???

    The koalas - many zoos make efforts too keep them. Duisburg was one of the pioneers in Europe , but no , i don't like this skeeping beautys.
    I like the raccoons. These vivid little creatures live in a large enclosure filled with branches and water. They waddle arround all the time... a vivid spectacle.

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    Duisburg zoo - big apes

    by belgianchocolate Updated Jun 8, 2003

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    male gorilla

    One of the things that this zoo has put great effort in was its apes exhibit...In the sixties the zoo had the largest and most modern apes-house at the time. More then thirty years later it was a sad thing to see. Now the gorillas can enjoy a large outside island , and in a cave after a glass it is possible to watch them very close in the eyes.

    Like most zoos in the world they have western lowland gorillas. Other habitans of the building are orangs (chimps have moved) some smaller monkeys and sloth (see the other tips)

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    Duisburg zoo - wallarium

    by belgianchocolate Updated Jun 8, 2003

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    In the sixties the zoo started to collect dolphins and whales. In a very small basin the two last survivors live and still give shows.
    The smallest one is even the oldest jacobita dolphin in captivity in the world and the other one is a white wale - a Beluga.
    They are really impressive too see , but also a bit sad if you know that they spend there whole live in this little tub.

    Another specimen - very very rare in zoos- are a couple of freshwater dolphins. Orinoco dolphins. (toninas)And there bath is even more sad then the other one. But it is probably the only chance you ever lay your eyes on this animals. (sad isn't it) Because they became extremely rare. And no these Days it is impossible what zoos have done in the past. Such creatures don't belong in zoos.

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Duisburg Things to Do

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