Paderborn Things to Do

  • Busdorfkirche from the east
    Busdorfkirche from the east
    by Kathrin_E
  • The Neuhaus Castle
    The Neuhaus Castle
    by MD2nd
  • Dom
    Dom
    by Kathrin_E

Most Recent Things to Do in Paderborn

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    The Three Hares Window

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 23, 2009

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    Three hares have six ears altogether?

    The tracery of one window in the cloister shows a trick of medieval mathematics. Three hares form a circle. Each of them has two ears but in total there are only three ears.

    Location: inside the cloister of the cathedral on the northern side, behind/above the peacock fountain.

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    Dom - the Cloister

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 23, 2009

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    Cathedral cloister
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    The cloister behind the choir is the burial place of the clerics of the cathedral. Access is from the northern transept through the chapel beside the choir, or from outside the cathedral.

    The modern fountain with the peacock refers to Saint Liborius, the local saint.

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    Dom – the Interior

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 23, 2009

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    Dom, interior

    The interior shows a gothic architecture but the furnishing has been redesigned and renewed later on.

    The cathedral is the burial place of St Liborius whose mortal remains were transferred from Le Mans to Paderborn in 836. His tomb is in the crypt.

    Thirty Bishops have been buried in the church. Some graves are in the nave, others in the crypt. The three archbishops have found their resting place in a separate crypt. The largest and most elaborate tombstone is the one of Bishop Dietrich von Fürstenberg, who died in 1618, in the northern side nave.

    If you want to experience the cathedral as a church and not only as a tourist sight, attend High Mass (Sunday 10:00) with the Metropolitan Chapter and, if he is in town, the Archbishop. During my visit he wasn’t but it was the Suffragan who celebrated mass. It was very festive.

    More photos of the interior in my travelogue page.

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    Dom – the Cathedral

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 23, 2009

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    Dom
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    A first missionary church was already founded in 777 when Charlemagne built the first palace (Pfalz) on the hill above the Pader springs. The diocese of Paderborn was founded in 799 when the future emperor met Pope Leo III in this very location to negotiate the coronation which then took place at Christmas 800 in Rome. So Paderborn made European history. This location was surrounded by territory of the pagan Saxons and played an important role both in their military suppression and in the mission.

    The first Bishop was Hathumar (806-815). The present Archbishop Hans-Josef Becker is the 65th Bishop and 4th Archbishop of Paderborn.

    The cathedral in its present shape was erected in the 13th century. Repairs and minor redesigns have taken place in the run of the centuries, though. The firestorm of 1945 has left the cathedral standing but the stones of the facades were burnt. The outside needed a new ‘skin’. The facades have, stone by stone, been substituted by new material in the old shape. The big sturdy steeple, built in the 13th century, is Paderborn’s landmark and visible from almost everywhere in town, thus a good point of orientation.

    From Market square you enter the cathedral through the Paradise Porch. Stop for a moment and see the sculptures of the Romanesque portal with the Madonna onn the central pillar, the holy Bishops Liborius and Kilian on the wooden doors, sic disciples and Saint Julian and Saint Catherine of Alexandria.

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    Busdorfkirche: the Cloister

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 23, 2009

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    Cloister behind Busdorfkirche
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    Busdorfkirche provides a hidden gem: the Romanesque cloister.

    This quiet, archaic spot should not be missed. It is, however, not easy to find if you don't know the way. To be honest, it was a mere coincidence that I found it. A narrow footpath outside the southern wall of the church takes you to a gate that seems to lead into a dark cellar-like vault - however, this is the entrance to the cloister. The path is public, just walk in.

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    Busdorfkirche: the Church

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 23, 2009

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    Busdorfkirche
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    Another former monastery church. This one belonged to a convent of the Busdorf congregation, a regional monastic order. The church dates back to the early middle ages. Unfortunately I was not able to walk around because people were praying the rosary. The church is on my to-do-list for my next visit.

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    Abdinghofkirche St Peter und Paul

    by Kathrin_E Written Aug 23, 2009

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    Abdinghofkirche
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    The church close to the cathedral has been used by the protestant parish of the mostly catholic city since 1866. From the foundation until 1803 it had belonged to a Benedictine monastery.

    The church was built in the early 11th century. In 1123 the crypt underneath the choir was consecrated by Bishop Meinwerk who was buried here after his death in 1123. The plain Romanesque church has a rather archaic appearance. Don’t miss the crypt (descent from both transepts) and the abbot’s chapel in the southern steeple on the first floor.

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    Sight seeing

    by AvaBirgit Written May 3, 2007

    Before my posting to Germany I had never visited and definately not heard half of the BEAUTIFUL places in Germany I was brought up in Switzerland with an Italian Background having my schooling in Italy so there most we learnt about Germany was rather more towards the World War II so it was places like Berlin, Dresden, Hannover, Hamburg & Cologne
    that we were told about.

    So being posted to such a quaint location like Paderborn just blew my mind away. Everything about Paderborn is so BEAUTIFUL from the people, various retail and eatery's, Saturday afternoon shopping, great nights out and lazy Sunday afternoons. In no way could a thought other locations in Germany but Paderborn has the best of everything including such lovely people.

    I definately recommend staying near the very lively town centre as there are lots to do and I duely recommend that if you want to spoil yourself stay at the BEST WESTERN AROSA HOTEL situated in Westermauer 15 mins drive from the Paderborn Airport and 2 minutes walk from Paderborn town centre. The staff are so courteous and professional and treat every single person that stays with them as an individual and very special nothing is ever too much trouble.

    Whenever I am on leave or just want to get away from my accommodation which is situated very near my work it's always the Arosa I stay at,... infact, I'm even given my own room in hotel as they see so much of me.

    So to take in the culture get packing, grab your passport and hot step it to Paderborn.

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    The Three-Hares-Window

    by SiCkb0y Updated Mar 13, 2007

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    The Symbol of Paderborn. At first I looked for it downtown - thought it would decorate one of the townhouses. I was wrong - it is actually inside the cathedral! Just follow the "Drei-Hasen-Fenster" signs until you reach the patio with the window. Connected with the window there's a saying: "Three Hares, three ears, but every hare has two ears"

    In the patio you can also find a bomb dropped on the cathedral during British attacks in 1945.

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    River Pader and its springs

    by himalia11 Updated Jun 12, 2005

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    Pader springs - bubbles

    Born is an old word for spring or well, and that’s where the name of Paderborn comes from. There are about 200 springs of the river Pader, and they are very strong. About 5000 liters water per second run into the river, from several tributaries. It’s impressive to see how much water wells out of the ground in the center of Paderborn and after what a short distance it already is a little river!
    At some places, you can even see some bubbles in the water coming out of the ground, which is very interesting. You can watch it quite good below of the Kaiserpfalz, street ‘Am Rothoborn’. There’s also a little park, but the other park in the near with some more springs is nicer.

    The Pader is the shortest river of Germany, as it is only 4 km long. Already in Schloss Neuhaus, a district of Paderborn, it flows into the river Lippe. Actually this river has less water, but nevertheless the further river is called Lippe. Not fair, I think!

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    Busdorf-Kirche

    by himalia11 Updated Jun 12, 2005

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    Cloister of the Busdorf Church

    The Busdorf church was sanctified 1036 and originally had the form of an octagon. But today, you don’t notice it. I didn’t found it that interesting especially as you can go just some steps inside until lattices stop you, but the cloister is nice. If you take the way on the right of the main entrance, you’ll find it.

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    Marktkirche (Market Church)

    by himalia11 Updated Jun 12, 2005

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    Market Church / Jesuit Church

    This church is a former Jesuit Church and was built in the late 17th century. It was almost completely destroyed 1945, only some things like the lectern and the Madonna were saved as they had been taken out early enough. It has been rebuild since then and was finished only some years ago with the reconstruction of the baroque high altar. The inside of the church looks really pompous, but not as overdone as several other baroque churches.

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    Schloss Neuhaus

    by himalia11 Written Jun 12, 2005

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    Palace Neuhaus

    Schloss Neuhaus is the name of a district of Paderborn and the name of a palace there (Schloss means castle/palace). It was build between 1370 and 1597 and once was the seat of the Prince bishop (until 1802). On the occasion of the regional Garden Festival in 1994, the palace and its side buildings went through several renovations and the garden was rebuild. It’s a nice baroque garden and if you want you can continue to walk through the Auen-Park (floodplain park) at the river Lippe or Pader.

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    Computer museum ’Heinz-Nixdorf-Museumsforum’ (HNF)

    by himalia11 Written Jun 12, 2005

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    Heinz Nixdorf Museum

    The Heinz-Nixdorf museum is a very interesting computer museum. It shows the history of information and data processing, over a time of 5000 years, starting with development of characters. You can experience how to calculate with an abacus, there’s an exhibition with lots of typewriters and coding machines, you will get to know the development of calculators, computer and telephone and much more. There are lots of old machines, with several explanations, and if you want to know more there are several multimedia terminals where you can get some details about the topic. Sometimes you can do some experiments yourself, like trying to calculate with an abacus. There’s also a so-called Spieleinsel (games platform) with computers with some computer games.

    On weekends there are free guided tours at 14:00 and 16:00. They take about one hour. Some machines are switched on only during a guided tour, so we partly joined the tour. We’ve spent about two hours there, and didn’t watch all the information films and didn’t do all experiments, so you can spent much more time in this museum!

    Admission: adults 4 Euro, children 2 Euro, family 8 Euro.
    Open 9:00 – 18:00 (Tuesday – Friday)/ 10:00 – 18:00 (weekend).

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    Adam und Eva Haus

    by himalia11 Written Jun 12, 2005

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    Adam and Eve house

    This is one of the oldest half-timbered house of Paderborn. It was build around 1560. There are lots of carvings, one tells about Adam and Eve and that's where the name of the house comes from.

    Inside is the City Museum of Paderborn where you get to know the history of Paderborn from the foundation by Charlemagne until the reconstruction of the city after World War II. Also, there are information about known characters of Paderborn. If you like old houses and are interested in the history of Paderborn, you should visit this museum!

    No admission.
    Open daily 10:00 – 18:00 except Monday.

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