Deutsches Eck, Koblenz

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The Confluence of the Rhein River and Mosel River

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  • Deutsches Eck from Ehrenbreitstein
    Deutsches Eck from Ehrenbreitstein
    by toonsarah
  • Kaiser Wilhelm I
    Kaiser Wilhelm I
    by toonsarah
  • Kaiser Wilhelm I - detail
    Kaiser Wilhelm I - detail
    by toonsarah
  • leics's Profile Photo

    A celebration of unity with river views.

    by leics Written Jul 12, 2015

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    Deutsches Eck (German corner) is the headland at the confluence of the Rhein and Mosel rivers. For some reason I'd expected the joining of such big rivers to be visible (some turbulence, perhaps) but the waters were calm when i wandered down to have a look.

    In 1897 a massive statue of Wilhelm l was erected on the paved headland, standing on top of an equally huge stepped stone plinth. In 1945 the statue was damaged by bombing and eventually removed. With the country divided into East and West, the area became a monument to a united Germany.

    When Germany reunited in 1990 it was decided that Deutsches Eck should once again be topped by a replica of that original statue, and that is what you'll see now, with the 16 flags of the various German Laender flying around the edge of the area. There are also three chunks of Berlin Wall, though I somehow missed them.

    To be honest, I'm not much interested in such monuments but I was fascinated by the 'hidden faces' I spotted. I spotted similar faces elsewhere, especially in Duesseldorf, and suspect they were influenced by the Jugendstil (Art Nouveau) movement popular from around 1890 - 1910.

    Apart from hidden-face-spotting, Deutsches Eck has excellent views of both the Mosel and the Rhein, and of the river traffic. It's certainly a good place for boat-spotting and a pleasant little area for sitting, though there is no shade.

    Calm waters at the confluence
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    Deutsches Eck

    by toonsarah Updated Jun 22, 2015

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    This is probably the most-visited (by tourists) spot in Koblenz, and yet it is one that stirs the most emotions and heated debate among Germans. Technically the name refers to the promontory created by the confluence of the Rhine and Moselle (“Eck” is German for corner, so the name means “German Corner”) but it is synonymous too with the huge monument that sits here. This is surmounted by a statue of Kaiser Wilhelm I, first erected here in 1897, nine years after his death. The statue was cast in copper, 14 metres high and 53 tons in weight. It portrayed the emperor on horseback wearing the cloak of a field marshal with helmet and plume. The inscription read, “Never will the Empire be destroyed, so long as you are united and loyal”, and the message was clear – a celebration of the Kaiser’s success in unifying the German Reich in the aftermath of the Franco-German War of 1870-71. As such it echoed the even more nationalistic Niederwald Monument of Germania some way to the south in Rüdesheim.

    In 1945 the Kaiser fell off his perch – or rather, the statue was so badly damaged by US shelling that it had to be taken down. The occupying French military government planned to replace it with a monument for peace and understanding among nations but never did so. However, after the division of Germany into East and West the Deutsches Eck was turned into a monument to German unity. A German flag flew from the monument’s still-standing base and the coats of arms of all German Länder (states) were erected here, including those of former German territories such as Silesia and East Prussia. In 1990, after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the emblems of the new Länder were added.

    But with reunification the role of the Deutsches Eck as a symbol of the wish for that unity became superfluous. Debate began on what to do with the monument, with some arguing for the reinstatement of the Kaiser Wilhelm I statue (or rather, a copy of it), and others that to do this would be out of step with modern-day sensibilities about empire and nationalism. Well, you can see from my photos (or for yourself if you visit) that the former argument won the day, which it did in 1992, largely on the grounds that the statue would be a tourist draw for the city of Koblenz.

    The replica was cast in bronze (more durable than the copper of the original) and erected here in September 1993. And its popularity with the many visitors who swarm around its base and take their “selfies” here can perhaps be seen as proving right those who argued for its reinstatement, although many Germans I believe still find it something of an embarrassment. Nevertheless it is probably a “must see” when in Koblenz, and worth visiting in any case for the view of the Moselle meeting the Rhine at this point.

    Next tip: fragments of the Berlin Wall

    Deutsches Eck from Ehrenbreitstein Kaiser Wilhelm I Kaiser Wilhelm I - detail Kaiser Wilhelm I
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    DUETSCHES ECK - GERMAN CORNER

    by balhannah Updated Jan 10, 2012

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    The point of land where the Rhine and Moselle flow together got its historical name "Deutsches Eck" (German Corner), in 1216.

    The German Corner has flags flying of the German states, as well as the European flag and the flag of the United States of America, which is dedicated to the victims of the 11th September 2001.

    This is where you will find the huge equestrian Statue of German Emperor Wilhelm I, who reunificated Germany after 3 wars.
    Three years later in 1891, the grandson of the deceased Emperor Wilhelm II, selected the German corner in Koblenz as a suitable place for the Statue. ,
    It was built 9 year's after his death in 1897.
    The monument was unveiled in the presence of Emperor Wilhelm II on August 31, 1897 and is a listed UNESCO World Culture Heritage Site of the Upper Middle Rhine Valley.

    The inscription is quoting a German poem: "Nimmer wird das Reich zerstöret, wenn ihr einig seid und treu" (Never will the Empire be destroyed, so long as you are united and loyal).

    Deutsches Eck Deutsches Eck - Emperor William 1 Deutsches Eck Deutsches Eck Deutsches Eck
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  • Karlie85's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Eck

    by Karlie85 Written Sep 17, 2009

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    Deutsches Eck, the German Corner, is the place where the Rhine River and the Mosel River meet. At this point there is a massive statue honoring Emperor Wilhelm I, who fought for German union in several wars, riding a horse. The original statue was put up in 1897, but was damaged in 1945, taken down, and not replaced again until 1993. There are stairs all around the statue, as well as the German flag and the flags of all 16 German states. It’s interesting to look out at where the two rivers meet; you can actually see the difference in the water from them. There are stairs that allow you to go up into the base of the statue as well.

    Deutsches Eck statue The Rhine and the Mosel meeting
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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    DEUTSCHES ECK

    by alyf1961 Written Jul 12, 2009

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    The spur between the rivers of the Rhine and the Mosel is called the Deutsches Eck [ German corner]. A statue of Emperor Wilhelm I stands here. It was erected in 1897 and designed by Bruno Schmitz. During world war II it was destroyed and replaced with a copy in 1993.

    STATUE OF EMPEROR WILHELM II

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Eck

    by mvtouring Written Mar 31, 2009

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    Deutsches Eck (German corner I think is the correct translation) was one of the first things we spotted from the boat as we approached Koblenz and was getting ready to dock. This is a historical place. It is also where the river Mosel flows into the river Rhine
    I am sure that when it is not raining it must be a lovely walk along the banks of both rivers, where I spotted plenty of restaurants, cafes and benches to relax.

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  • Elena77's Profile Photo

    Deutschherrenhaus

    by Elena77 Written Dec 11, 2008

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    The Knights of the Teutonic Order 1st came to Koblenz in 1216, after Archbishop Theoderich of Wied granted them a piece of land next to St. Castor’s church. The bestowal included the buildings of the St. Nikolaus Hospital which was situated here since around 1100. Teutonic Knights were called on to aid as a crusading military order during the Middle Ages but it was also their task to maintain hospitals to care for the sick and injured or for pilgrims. They established their commandry here, at the confluence of the rivers Rhine and Moselle, and due to their presence soon the site was known as “Deutsches Eck” (German Corner). The Teutonic Knights considerably enlarged the commandry by acquiring 20 buildings in and around Koblenz and in the middle of the 13th century it was appointed a bailiwick.
    The Knight’s church, that was built at this site in 1306, was almost completely torn down in 19th century and only the Southern walls have been preserved. Large parts of the commandry were later destroyed in WWII. Parts of the outer walls of the 14th century chapel can still be seen. The residential building of the Order’s commander has been restored from war damage, though.
    Around 1800 the building was leased out to private citizens. But already in 1819 the Prussian military administration moved in and “Deutschherrenhaus” was used as a provisions magazine until 1895 when it was converted into the public record office.
    Since 1992 it has been the home of the Ludwig Museum, devoted primarily to 20th century Frechn art. There’s a permanent exhibition called “Atelier de France”. Behind the museum’s main building you can find the gardens of the so called “Blumenhof” (flower court) where several 3-dimensional works of art are displayed.

    Deutschherrenhaus Cross of the Teutonic Knights Entrance to
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    Berlin Wall

    by Elena77 Written Dec 5, 2008

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    At Deutsches Eck (German Corner) you can find 3 original concrete components of the Berlin Wall. They've been established as a monument to reunion. Bronze plates are affixed to the components and the inscriptions are: "17. Juni 1953", "9. November 1989" and "Den Opfern der Teilung":

    17th of June 1953 was the date of the 1st attempt of the reunion between Western and Eastern Germany. This national uprising was violently suppressed by Soviet tanks and many people died on that sad day.
    9th of November 1989 was the day when the Berlin Wall finally came down and Eastern Germany opened its borders to the West.
    "Den Opfern der Teilung" means "Dedicated to the victims of separation".

    Deutsches Eck had been chosen as a site for this memorial as the place itself had served as a monument to the hope of unity for decades.

    Elements of the Berlin Wall
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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    kaiser wilhelm I statue

    by doug48 Updated Jun 7, 2008

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    the kaiser wilhelm I statue is located at the deutsches eck, (german corner). the deutsches eck is where the rhine and mosel river meet. the kaiser wilhelm I statue was built in 1897 and was designed by bruno schmitz. in 1945 the american army blew up the statue. after the war the statue was rebuilt by citizen donations.

    kaiser wilhelm I statue
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    Deutsches Ecke - German Corner

    by Tdawg40sw Written Apr 18, 2008

    The Deutsches Ecke (German Corner) is located where the Rhine and Moselle rivers meet. There is a huge statue of Emporer William I riding his horse. There is also a good view of the Ehrenbreitstein fortress high above the ecke on the opposite bank. There are several Rhine tours that can be taken from here.

    Emporer William I Fortress Ehrenbreitstein
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  • Elena77's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Eck/ The Emperor's Monument

    by Elena77 Written Oct 19, 2007

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    Deutsches Eck (German Corner) lies on a spit of land at the point where the Mosel flows into the Rhein. The name originates from the Knights of the Teutonic Order (Deutscher Orden) who settled and established their 1st centre here in 1216. Following banking-up of the promontory at the end of the 19th century, a monument to Emperor Wilhelm I was built here, commemorating the victory of 1871. The construction took from 1883 to 1897. The project was proposed a few weeks after the Emperor's death and a call for donations brought in 80,000 Mark from the Republic. It was Emperor Wilhelm II who decided on the final location of the monument; the parliament of the provinces had originally chosen the Drachenfels rock overlooking Königswinter. A total of 6 million gold Mark was spent on the project. Overall the monument was 37 metres high, the 14 metres equestrian statue of the Emperor was cast from 35,000 kg of copper ingots. The Emperor's gaze faced down rive, the horse's tail towards the arch-enemy: France. ;) After standing here for 48 years the monument was destroyed in World War II, on March 16 1945. Horse and rider tipped over to the right to hang head-down from the base of the monument. Then the statue simply disappeared, creating a great sensation! Until today no-one knows who was behind this "kidnapping", or why and how they did it!! The monument was initially redesigned without the statue by mounting the coats of arms of Germany's federal states along the semicircular South Wall. But in 1987 a Koblenz publisher made an impressive offer: he said he would finance a copy of the original statue and give it to the city of Koblenz as a present. And on September 2nd 1993, Europe's biggest floating crane lifted the faithful 61.5-ton bronze copy of the equestrian statue of Emperor Wilhelm I onto its restored pedestal.

    Equestrian statue of Emperor Wilhelm I The complete monument Detail of the pedestal South Wall with coats of arms Ascent to the monument
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Deutsches Eck (German Corner)

    by Nemorino Updated Jan 6, 2007

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    The name Koblenz comes from a Latin word for confluence, the place where two rivers come together. The Moselle, above, joins the Rhine here at the German Corner.

    Second photo: Deutsches Eck with ships on both rivers.

    Third photo: This ugly equestrian statue of the militaristic German Emperor Wilhelm I was first set up here in 1897 and was mercifully destroyed by artillery fire at the end of the Second World War. Instead of leaving well enough alone, somebody insisted on raising money to make a replica, which was unveiled in 1993.

    1. Deutsches Eck (German Corner) 2. Deutsches Eck with ships on both rivers 3. Don't ask
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    The German Corner

    by sourbugger Written Jan 5, 2007

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    There is a very fine statue (a copy as the French obliterated it at the end of WW 2) of Wilhelm II on a big horse, on a big plinth sticking out on a little promentory where the two great rivers of the Mosel and the Rhine meet.

    For years it was an acceptable symbol of German Unity and pride. I understand that when German telly came to closedown time, the German corner would often be used as a backdrop to the closing music (*)

    The base of the statue is adorned with the names of various German cities and towns. When East Germany fell and the country was re-unified the names of former East German Cities were added to the monument - and thus the symbolism of the monument was somewhat lost.

    * Nowadays with 24hour TV there is no closedown. Instead the night hours are filled with comely fraulines wearing skimpy lederhosen inviting you to ring them on 'Fine - Fumpf - fine - fumpf - sex - noin - sex - noin - sex noin.

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    Deutsches Eck

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Nov 16, 2006

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    The Deutsches Eck -- or Corner of Germany -- is a great description of this piece of land where the Mosel and Rhein Rivers meet. Today this public area is dominated by an enormous statue of Kaiser Wilhelm I, who ruled Germany until his death in 1888. The original statue was constructed during his Grandson Wilhelm II's reign, in 1897. Wilhelm II is most famous for his role in starting World War I.

    The statue was destroyed in 1945 near the end of World War II, and replaced in 1953 with a monument for Germany's army. In 1993, a replica of the original Wilhelm I statue was erected at this site and stands today.

    Wilhelm I Equestrian Statue

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    Deutsches Eck

    by Bigs Written Dec 14, 2005

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    The Rhine and the Mosel meet here. There is a huge monument that is dedicated to thr reunion of germany. It´s build under Kasier Wilhelm in the early 20th century and it´s very patriotic. I don´t like it, think it´s oversized and ugly. Part of a long gone German national pride.

    Nevertheless it´s nice to see how the rivers unite here.

    The monument Mosel (left) and Rhine (right) The Mosel
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