museums, Mainz

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  • A primitive music score
    A primitive music score
    by ellyse
  • Bishopric Museum, Mainz
    Bishopric Museum, Mainz
    by Airpunk
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    by Airpunk
  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Gutenberg Museum

    by Nemorino Updated Nov 1, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Not far from the theater is the Gutenberg Museum, documenting the invention of the printing press by Johannes Gutenberg around the middle of the fifteenth century. Gutenberg was a native of Mainz and did most of his major work here.

    The photo shows a working replica of one of his presses. When I was there the other day I caught part of a demonstration of how it worked. When the type has been set it took quite a bit of muscle power to press the paper down against the type with that wooden handle that looks like a baseball bat.

    Upstairs in a vault in glass cases there are several actual books that Gutenberg printed, along with hand-copied books from the same period. Further exhibits show the work of other early printers, and the development of paper, and printing presses from later centuries.

    This is a beautiful museum -- comprehensive but not overblown -- about the seminal invention of the second millennium.

    Gutenberg Museum, Mainz
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    Landesmuseum

    by antistar Updated Jul 23, 2013

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    The enormous state museum of Mainz occupies the old imperial stable buildings of the Kurfürstliche Schloss just up from it on Grosse Bleiche. Its past is symbolised by an outstanding golden statue of a rearing horse on the roof of the entrance. The museum houses a collection of local pieces dating from Roman time onwards, including the original Jupitersäul that can be seen behind St Peter's church diagonally opposite. Some of its other famous artefacts include a Celtic dog made from coloured glass and an ivory Madonna from Trier, in the far west of the state. In addition to the archeology section the museum also includes a gallery, as well as a small Jewish collection.

    Landesmuseum, Mainz

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Gutenberg Museum

    by antistar Written Apr 2, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Along with the unmissable and original Gutenberg Bible, the collection includes some fascinating works covering hundreds of years of European printing, and in the case of the Asian collection a thousand years. It's amazing to see how quickly the printing press evolved in such a small space of time. The first presses reproduced text in the exact same way as it had been done by hand for a thousand or more years, in a torturously ornate, nearly illegible, manner. Within about a hundred years the books being printed across Europe had developed a typeface not all that different to what you are seeing as you read this paragraph.

    The next few hundred years saw an explosion of ideas that led to the development of the written word as we know it today, and you can see this charted in the books and manuscripts on display. Simple things that we take for granted today like periods, commas, italics, and even paragraphs had to be developed to service an increasingly large, diverse and hungry audience. For example some of the early books didn't use periods except at the end of a paragraph, and used no separator (no comma, no colon, no semi-colon) only a /. Even as recently as the 19th century they were still using the a symbol more like an f to represent the modern s, and it is very confusing to see very modern English writing with strange archaic symbols.

    The only real downside to the museum is that cameras are expressly forbidden, not even with the flash off, in the upper sections of the museum. That's just where all the interesting exhibits happen to be, so it is really annoying. I can understand them not wanting flash lights going off all the time, but banning cameras completely seems unfair. My camera crazy Italian friend Luciano (pictured) was particularly upset that he couldn't take a picture of the Gutenberg Bible, and after an hour of wandering around I'd lost him, only to find him again down in the basement frantically getting his picture fix taking multiple snaps of the modern printing machinery on display.

    Gutenberg Museum, Mainz

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  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    Gutenberg Museum

    by yooperprof Updated May 15, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Local boy makes good - brings printing to the European scene - unwittingly launches a revolution!

    The Gutenberg Museum attempts to tell the whole story of printing, not just the local perspective, but the entire global saga of movable type and the reproducible image.

    If you are a bibliophile - like me - or just someone who enjoys knowing "how things work" this museum is a must-see. An additional matter of interest is that the Gutenberg is housed in a beautiful structure that dates from 1664. Although it was heavily damaged in World War II, it was carefully restored to its original appearance.

    The museum has two copies of the treasured 42-line Bible produced in Gutenberg's garage just around the corner.

    The armored figure who stands above the main entrance is one of the Holy Roman Emperors, although I'm not certain which one.

    Im-press-ive! all dressed up with nowhere to go making vellum - the museum's basement workshop
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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Gutenberg Museum

    by Tom_Fields Written Mar 15, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing press in a partnership with local merchant Johann Fust, right here in Mainz. He produced the first of his famed Gutenberg Bibles in the 1450s. The new invention made possible, for the first time in history, the rapid, cheap, widespread dissemination of human knowledge. It also made mass literacy possible. Books, once rare and costly, became common. This led to the Protestant Reformation (once the lay people had their own Bibles). Ultimately, it helped to bring out the Scientific, Industrial, and Democratic revolutions. In short, it changed everything.

    The museum has one of Gutenberg's original printing presses, and a nice collection of Asian art and calligraphy. There is also an impressive collection of medieval prints, manuscripts, and artwork from Germany and around Europe. This should be on everyone's must-see list.

    The Gutenberg Museum The invention that changed everything Chinese art and calligraphy
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  • TempNomad's Profile Photo

    Gutenberg Museum shows the Birthplace of Printing

    by TempNomad Written Apr 17, 2006

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    Since both my husband and I are nuts about books (teacher and editor, hello?), we HAD to stop in here. We spent just over two hours in Mainz, and almost two hours of that was in the museum. There are magnificant displays here, and many are incredibly rare. You can follow the displays chronologically, or you can wander around and treat it more like an art museum than a history tour. The presses, the printings, the illuminated texts...it's gorgeous.

    I strongly recommend purchasing the Museum Guide in the shop. It's available in many languages. Definitely worth the three Euro. Entrance during the summer of 2005 was 5 Euro.

    See the press in person

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Gutenberg - Museum

    by Airpunk Written Jan 24, 2014

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    Excellent museum, I might even say that this is the one you have to visit in Mainz. Of course, it is about Gutenberg's invention of printing with movable letters. But all the single exhibitions tell the history of printing. The sections about printing in the far east and the Islamic world are really good and explain why printing established itself later there than in Europe. Other parts show the evolution of printing machines, the first newspapers, the influence of the invention on history (e.g. protestant reformation) and of course two original Gutenberg bibles.

    A 20 min. film about the man and his invention is shown regularly, every hour (except 1 pm), a replica of Gutenberg's printing press is demonstrated. If you want to have a facsimile from a Gutenberg bible page for free, volunteer to operate the press when you are asked (The same page is sold for around five EUR in the museum shop). Unfortunately, there is only one volunteer per demonstration and therefore only one free facsimile. Both things are in German only.

    Description of the exhibits in German and in some cases also in English. Audioguides however are available in German, English, French. It has five tours which cover different parts of the building. Take tour 1 only if you are in hurry (20 – 25 min.) - it covers the highlights. Add all other tours (around 10 minutes each) if you have more time. Entry fee is 5,00 EUR for adults (2014), discounts available for groups and concessions. Photos are not permitted at all.

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    Landesmuseum

    by Airpunk Written Jan 24, 2014

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    The state museum of Rheinland-Pfalz has a large collection reflecting the history of Mainz and its surrounding areas west to the Rhine. As many of the German state museums, it has high quality exhibits and is surely worth a visit.

    The ground floor is usually home to temporary exhibitions as well as the Roman exhibition. Though the latter consists mostly of tombstones, it also has a Roman city gate, a Jupiter column and the remains of a once huge Nero bronze sculpture. The first floor has the middle age exhibition, including a small tribute to the Jewish community in form of medieval Judaica. There is also a collection of 16th century Dutch paintings. Though the big names like Rembrandt are missing, the works are still good and the special features of Dutch Golden Age painting are well explained. Close to it, as part of the medieval exhibition, are the remains of a market hall. It includes the depiction of the seven electors (a popular motif in medieval Germany) in two metre high sandstone plates. Finally, this floor has also a collection of Mainz Baroque items, including furniture and porcelain. The upper floor has 19th and 20th century art.

    The building is located in the former arsenal. With the collection dating back to Napoleonic times, it is one of the oldest museums in Germany. The entry fee is 6,00 EUR for adults (2013, half price for concessions) and often includes the temporary exhibitions. Plan around 3 hours for a visit, add more or plan less depending on your interest in the mentioned topics. Pictures allowed, but only hand held cameras, not flash and only for private purposes. Information in English is rather limited. However, there are English audioguides as well as audioguides in German, French, Spanish and Italian.

    Landesmuseum Mainz One of the famous Roman tombstones Roman arches in Mainz The modern art exhibition Medieval stone plates of the seven Prince-Electors
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    Roman and Germanic Museum (RGZM)

    by Airpunk Written Jan 24, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As a Roman foundation and the former capital of a Roman province, there has to be a Roman museum in Mainz. This one is not only a museum, but a scientific institution which also has a focus on research and publications. Unfortunately, this also means that the presentation of the exhibits looks a little old-fashioned and is not as easily accessible as those of other museums (e.g.: Landesmuseum). Don't get me wrong, the exhibitions are quite good. But if you are not very interested in the topic or have kids with you, this might not be the most entertaining place.

    The first floor has the exhibition about the Romans in Mainz and Roman life in general, but also includes the tribes which lived at the borders of the Roman empire and influenced Roman culture in the one or other way. The second floor focuses on the demise of the Roman empire and the early middle ages in Europe. I liked this one a lot as this is a time which is not often well-covered in other museums. Plan around an hour to 1 ½ hours for each floor – depending on your interest in the topic. The museum is located in the former Electoral Palace, close to the Rhine. Entry is free!

    Building of the RGZM Building of the RGZM
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    Bishopric Museum / Dommuseum

    by Airpunk Written Mar 2, 2014

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    This museum – usually left aside by tourists - exceeded my expectations. Unlike similar museums, it is not focused only on the church treasury but has a large collection of religious art dating from late Roman times to the 20th century. Many of the exhibits are salvaged items from churches destroyed during WWII. Don't forget to have a look on the four models of the Cathedral in the ground floor and the model of the old Cathedral entrance with the mysterious medieval boss figure in the basement.
    There is always a temporary exhibition in the ground floor. Judging from the quality of the one I saw, they can be highly recommended. At the time of my visit, drawings from Heinz Leitermann were presented. Leitermann was a local artist and chronicler. His works include drawings from Mainz' damaged churches in the post WWII-years. Many were from the years 1946 and 1947 and included details like vegetation growing out of the ruins. The drawings are beautiful and great as documents of post-WWII Mainz.

    Entrance fee is 5,00 EUR, concessions 3,50 EUR. As a nice treat you have free entrance on the day of your namesake saint (all information as of early 2014). 1 to 1 ½ hours should be fine. The only drawback is that all information is in German.

    Entry to the Bishopric Museum Bishopric Museum, Mainz Bishopric Museum, Mainz Cathedral Treasury, Mainz Former Cathedral fragments, Mainz
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  • Caius's Profile Photo

    Central Museum of Roman History

    by Caius Written Oct 8, 2002

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    Fantastic Museum with Roman military and civilan equipment, originals and copies of important peices from all over the world. The muesum is right on the Main River, and is one of the few buildings in the area not bombed to rubble in WW2.

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    Museum of Ancient Seafaring

    by Airpunk Written Mar 2, 2014

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    Many traces of Roman Mainz have been found when streets were dug up to build something new. When the Hilton hotel was constructed, the wrecks of five Roman ships were found. They form the base for the Museum of Ancient Seafaring (Museum für Antike Schiffahrt) which is located in a former engine shop. Next to the wrecks, there are replicas of two of the ships. The rest of the exhibition mainly consists of the explanation of commercial and military seafare in the Roman empire. The upper floor as the evolution of ship types throughout ancient cultures explained, a corner is dedicated to ancient ornaments with naval motives. If you are lucky, you can see conservation work going on.

    The museum is run by the RGZM, the Roman-Germanic Central Museum which also has a museum in the former Prince Elector's Palace. Both museums are quite similar: Free entry, strictly no photos (all as of 2014) and quite heavy when it comes to text. That means that although it has a lot of high quality information to read, it is not the most entertaining place. At least, contrary to the main RGZM museum, this museum has a children's corner. All text is in German with limited English information.

    I like the place, but noticed that after some time it was hard to concentrate on all the text.

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  • CandiceHalee's Profile Photo

    Gutenberg Museum

    by CandiceHalee Written Jun 7, 2007

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you do not speak or at least read German, I would highly recommend visiting this museum on a tour of your own language or at least with a friend who speaks German. There are very few exhibits that are translated, so you will be as lost as we were without help. I'm sure it is very interesting, but we could do little other than look at the exhibits and guess what they might be. In a few cases we could figure out a bit of info on what we were looking at, but I didn't learn much.
    The display outside of the printing plates was impressive, the gift shop was not. The few nice things that were there were outrageously expensive, and the affordable items were tacky. My souvenirs from the Gutenberg Museum are my ticket stub and a postcard.

    Printing plates Me and Mr.Gutenberg
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  • FreeCloud's Profile Photo

    Gutenburg Printing Museum

    by FreeCloud Written Sep 2, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gutenburg Printing Museum
    More photos in
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  • Kristina1701's Profile Photo

    Gutenberg Museum

    by Kristina1701 Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gutenberg Museum
    it's a world-famous museum of script (hope that's the correct word) and print. It was founded in 1900 on the occasion of Johannes Gutenberg's 500th birthday.

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