Fun things to do in Land Rheinland-Pfalz

  • Deutsches Eck from Ehrenbreitstein
    Deutsches Eck from Ehrenbreitstein
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  • Rococo interior
    Rococo interior
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  • A primitive music score
    A primitive music score
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    14] Lorelei Rock and legend

    by toonsarah Updated Aug 1, 2010

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    Probably the most famous sight on the River Rhine is not one of its many castles, striking those these are, but a simple rock – the Rock of the Lorelei. It lies on the eastern bank of the Rhine near St. Goarshausen, and rises about 120 metres above the waterline. Here the river is at its narrowest at any point between Switzerland and the North Sea, just 113 metres. The current is consequently very strong and rocks below the surface add to the dangers to shipping. The village of St. Goar, directly opposite the rock, is named for Saint Goar who settled here and devoted his life to saving shipwrecked mariners and nursing them back to health.

    The many accidents here over the years have led to the creation of a legend – that of the Lorelei. Many cultures seem to tell a similar tale; that of a beautiful maiden who lures sailors to their deaths by drawing them on to the rocks. In England we have our mermaids, the Ancient Greeks had their Sirens, and in Germany the Lorelei fills the same role. In this case it is a legend of quite recent origin, created at the start of the 19th century by the German author Clemens Brentano in his poem Zu Bacharach am Rheine. But it was another poet who made the legend what it is today – known around the world, and drawing visitors to this somewhat unprepossessing rock in their thousands. Heinrich Heine wrote his poem, Die Lorelei a few years later in 1822, and it became one of the most popular in the German language. In fact it had to be labelled as "written by unknown writer" during the Third Reich because it was too popular to ban it completely for its Jewish authorship. My own first encounter with the poem was at school, when everyone in my German class was required to learn it by heart as a punishment for misbehaviour! I was amazed on this trip to find that the first verse at least had stuck in my memory, in the original German!

    Die Lorelei, by Heinrich Heine

    Ich weiss nicht, was soll es bedeuten,
    Dass ich so traurig bin;
    Ein Märchen aus alten Zeiten,
    Das kommt mir nicht aus dem Sinn.

    Die Luft ist kühl, und es dunkelt,
    Und ruhig fliesst der Rhein;
    Der Gipfel des Berges funkelt
    In Abendsonnenschein.

    Die schönste Jungfrau sitzet
    Dort oben wunderbar,
    Ihr goldenes Geschmeide blitzet,
    Sie kämmt ihr goldenes Haar.

    Sie kämmt es mit goldenem Kamme
    Und singt ein Lied dabei;
    Das hat eine wundersame,
    Gewaltige Melodei.

    Den Schiffer im kleinen Schiffe
    Ergreift es mit wildem Weh;
    Er schaut nicht die Felsenriffe,
    Er schaut nur hinauf in die Höh'.

    Ich glaube, die Wellen verschlingen
    Am Ende Schiffer und Kahn;
    Und das hat mit ihrem Singen
    Die Lorelei getan.

    Translation

    I know not if there is a reason
    Why I am so sad at heart.
    A legend of bygone ages
    Haunts me and will not depart.

    The air is cool under nightfall.
    The calm Rhine courses its way.
    The peak of the mountain is sparkling
    With evening's final ray.

    The fairest of maidens is sitting
    Unwittingly wondrous up there,
    Her golden jewels are shining,
    She's combing her golden hair.

    The comb she holds is golden,
    She sings a song as well
    Whose melody binds an enthralling
    And overpowering spell.

    In his little boat, the boatman
    Is seized with a savage woe,
    He'd rather look up at the mountain
    Than down at the rocks below.

    I know the waves will devour
    The boatman and boat as one;
    And this by her song's sheer power
    Fair Lorelei has done.

    The poem has since been set to music. As we passed the rock on our cruise the song was played over the ship’s PA – a very atmospheric moment.

    North of the rock is a small statue of Die Lorelei - see second photo.

    Rock of the Lorelei Lorelei statue
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    13] Schoenberg Castle

    by toonsarah Written Aug 1, 2010

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    Burg Schoenberg is yet another of those that nowadays functions as a hotel, and like many others had a fairly turbulent history. The Dukes of Schoenburg ruled over the nearby town of Oberwesel and had also the right to levy customs on the Rhine. Unusually, the family had a tradition whereby all the sons inherited the castle equally on a duke’s death (rather than just the oldest inheriting the lot), so at the height of its power in the 14th century the castle accommodated up to 250 people from 24 different families at the same time. The family dies out in the late 17th century.

    Meanwhile the castle was burned down in 1689 by French soldiers during the War of the Palatine Succession. It remained in ruins for two centuries until an American of German ancestry, a Mr. Rhinelander (appropriate name!), bought the castle from the town of Oberwesel in the late 19th century and invested two million Gold Marks in its restoration. The town council of Oberwesel acquired the castle back from Rhinelander’s son in 1950, and in 1957 leased it for the establishment of a hotel and restaurant, which it remains to this day. It looks like a wonderful place to stay, or eat, if you are looking for something a bit special in this area (see website below).

    At the foot of the hill lies Oberwesel, which you can see in my second photo. The church is the Frauernkirche or Church of Our Lady, considered to be one of the most important high Gothic churches in Germany. It was started in 1308, consecrated in 1331 and completed up to the base of the polygonal tower in 1351. Many elements of its interior are apparently intact: high altar, the choir screen, the tabernacle, the choir stalls, some stained glass windows and its bells. It sounds well worth a visit if, unlike us, you should be on dry land around here.

    Burg Schoenberg Burg Schoenberg and Oberwesel
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    11] Gutenfels Castle

    by toonsarah Written Aug 1, 2010

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    Burg Gutenfels is another of those transformed into a hotel. It lies on the east bank of the Rhine, that is in Land Hessen rather than Rhineland-Palatinate. It was originally known as Burg Falkenstein, after the family who owned it, but took its new name after an unsuccessful siege in 1504 by landgrave Wilhelm from Hessen. Gutenfels means “solid rock”, a name which could easily be applied to any of these fortifications, but which was chosen to describe its apparently impregnable nature.

    While doing my research I came across this legend about the castle, which offers another reason for the name:

    ”In the 13th century, there was a stately castle near Kaub which was inhabited by Count Philip of Falkenstein. Then he lived happily with his beautiful sister Guta, who was as good as she was fair. Numerous knights it sought to win her love, but none had achieved this conquest. At this time a magnificent tournament was held at Cologne, to which knights from all countries far and near were invited. Among the nobles present was a knight from England, whose graceful figure and splendid armour were particularly striking. He wore a veiled visor and the stewards of the tournament announced him under the name of "The Lion Knight".

    Guta watched this strange knight with ever increasing interest during the tournament, regretting that she could not see his face. But an opportunity soon presented itself when the knight was declared victor. She was selected to present the prize, a golden laurel wreath, to the winner.... This same evening in the banqueting hall he was Guta's inseparable companion, and eloquent words flowed from his lips. The proud stranger begged Guta for her love and swore to be hers; he told her he must at once return to his country where urgent duty called him, but that he would come back to claim her in three months time. Then he would publicly sue for her hand and declare his name, which circumstances compelled him to keep secret for the time being. Guta accepted her lover's pledge willingly, and they parted under the assurance that they would soon meet again.

    Five months passed. ... That terrible time ensued when Germany became the battlefield of the struggles over the election of the Emperor. Conrad IV (Konrad IV), the last of the House of Hohenstaufen, had died in Italy. In the northern countries there was a great rising against William of Holland who was struggling for the imperial throne. Alphonso (Alfonso) of Castile was chosen king in one part of the country, while Richard of Cornwall, son of John, King of England, was elected in another. But Richard, having received most influential votes, was crowned at Aachen, and from thence he started on a journey through the Rhine provinces, to the favour of which he had been chiefly indebted for his election.

    Spring was casting her bright beams over waves and mountains in the valley of the Rhine, but in Falkenstein Castle no ray of sunshine penetrated the gloom. Guta, pale and unhappy, sat within its walls, weaving dreams which seemed destined never to be fulfilled. Sometimes she saw her love dying on a terrible battlefield with her name on her lips, then again laughing and bright with a maiden from that far-off island in his arms, talking derisively of his sweetheart on the Rhine. She became more and more conscious that she had given him her first love, and that he had cruelly deceived her. Sorrow and grief had taken possession of her, and all of her brother's efforts to amuse her and to distract attention were in vain.

    A great sound of trumpets was heard one day on the highway, and a troop of knights stopped at the castle. The count with chivalrous hospitality received them, and let them into the banqueting hall. His astonishment was great, when he recognized the bold Briton, the victor at the tournament in Cologne, as leader of his brilliant retinue, he who had broken his secret pledge to his beloved sister. A dark glance took the place of the friendly expression on his face. The Briton seemed to notice it and pressing Philip's hand said cordially, "I am Richard of Cornwall, elected Emperor of Germany, and I have come here to solicit the hand of your sister Guta, who promised herself to me five months ago in Cologne. I come late to redeem my promise, but my love is unchanged. I beg you to announce my arrival to her without betraying my name."

    Philip bowed deeply before the illustrious guest, and the retainers respectfully retired to a distance. The great guest strode up and down the room impatiently. Then the doors were suddenly thrown open, and a beautiful figure appeared on the threshold, her face glowing with emotion. With a low cry Guta threw herself into her love's arms, and the first moments of their reunion were passed in silent happiness.

    ... Shortly afterwards Richard celebrated his marriage with Imperial magnificence at the castle on the Rhine, which Philip thenceforth called Gutenfels (Guta's Cliffs) in honour of his sister.”

    Burg Gutenfels
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    10] Bacherach and the vineyards

    by toonsarah Updated Aug 1, 2010

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    The village of Bacherach is strung out along the Rhine at the foot of the steep hills that hold its treasure – the vines that produce the wine on which its economy relies. Indeed, wine from this region is known as Bacharacher (see photo 2). From our vantage point on the boat it seemed one of the prettiest and most interesting of those we passed, and I would love to go back one day, on dry land, to explore it properly.

    One feature that stands out is the unfinished Gothic ruin of the Wernerkapelle, on the left in my photo. It has a rather regrettable history. It is named for Werner von Oberwesel, an outspoken anti-Semite. Local Christians claimed (almost certainly inaccurately) that he was murdered on Maundy Thursday 1287 by members of the local Jewish community, who then used his blood for Passover observances. These allegations were used as a reason (some might say excuse) for a pogrom, which wiped out Jewish communities not only on the Middle Rhine, but also on the Moselle and in the Lower Rhine region. A local cult grew up, worshipping Werner as a saint, and this was only stricken from the calendar by the Bishop of Trier in 1963. The chapel now bears a plaque recalling the inhuman crimes against Jewish residents and also containing a quotation from a prayer by Pope John XXIII:

    “We recognize today that many centuries of blindness have shrouded our eyes, so that we no longer saw the goodliness of Thy Chosen People and no longer recognized our firstborn brother’s traits. We discover now that a mark of Cain stands on our forehead. In the course of the centuries our brother Abel has lain in blood that we spilt, and he has wept tears that we brought forth, because we forgot Thy love. Forgive us the curse that we unrightfully affixed to the Jews’ name. Forgive us for nailing Thee in their flesh for a second time to the Cross. For we knew not what we did........."

    The church in my main photo is Saint Nicholas’s Catholic Church. Other sights include half-timbered houses (some dating back to medieval times), a pretty market place and the town walls, which are among the best preserved in Rhineland-Palatinate.

    Bacherach Bacherach - the vineyards
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    9] Stahleck Castle

    by toonsarah Written Aug 1, 2010

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    Burg Stahleck was built in the 12th century on the orders of the Archbishop of Cologne, though some accounts indicate that there was a castle on the site at least a century before that. Towards the end of that century it became the property of the emperor Barbarossa, who gave it to his brother Konrad. It was badly damaged by the French in 1644 (during the Thirty Years' War), repaired 20 years later, and in 1689 again attacked and this time more or less destroyed by the French troops of Louis XIV. It was abandoned until 1828 when it was purchased by the prince of Prussia. It 1909 it was transferred to the Rhine Association for the Care of Monuments and Landscape Protection who began the first repairs in 1910. It was only properly restored however between 1925 and 1927. It now serves as a youth hostel, and I believe you have to be staying here to see inside, although the castle courtyard can be visited by anyone. It stands 500 steps above the pretty village of Bacherach.

    Check out the website below if you fancy staying there. Of course, we had our comfortable cabin on the boat so had no need to do so!

    Burg Stahleck
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    8] Furstenberg Castle

    by toonsarah Written Aug 1, 2010

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    Burg Furstenberg was built in 1219 by order of an archbishop, the bishop of Cologne, to provide protection of his estates and to levy tolls. Like the other nearby castles it was destroyed in the War of the Palatine Succession, but unlike many of the others, it has not been restored. But I think its 82 foot high tower and ancient walls look all the more “Romantic”, crumbling into the hillside above the river like this.

    Not open to the public.

    Burg Furstenberg
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    7] Heimburg Castle and Niederheimbach

    by toonsarah Updated Aug 1, 2010

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    Just north of Burg Sooneck, the village of Niederheimbach nestles beneath Heimburg Castle. Like all the villages on this stretch of the Rhine its economy relies on viniculture, but it grew up based also on another industry. Navigation of the river south of here was always particularly difficult, and in the past no sailor would have passed without stopping at Niederheimbach to take a pilot on board.

    Today the village has some picturesque old houses and is dominated by the Church of the Assumption, with some parts of its structure such as the tower dating back to the 13th century.

    Above the village is Heimburg Castle, another 19th century rebuilding of a 13th century original, this time by the industrialist Hugo Stinnes. It is still owned by the same family and is not open to the public.

    Niederheimbach
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    6] Sooneck Castle

    by toonsarah Written Aug 1, 2010

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    Just beyond Trechtingshausen we came to the village of Niederheimbach and its castle, Sooneck. Like many of the other castles, this is a 19th century rebuilding of a ruin. The original castle on this site dated back to the mid 13th century, but was destroyed in 1689 by the troops of King Louis XIV of France during the War of the Palatine Succession. The ruins were bought by the then crown prince of Prussia, Frederick William IV, and his brothers Princes William, Charles, and Albert in 1834, and rebuilt for use as a hunting
    lodge. They retained some of the old structures and added to them considerably, in the Romantic style so fashionable at that time.

    After World War One the castle became a possession of the state and today is administered by the Generaldirektion Kukturelles Erbe Rheinland-Pfalz, who open it to the general public. Of course, like all these castles, we weren’t able to visit, but simply admired it as we passed below on the river.

    Burg Sooneck Another view of Burg Sooneck
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    5] Reichenstein Castle

    by toonsarah Written Aug 1, 2010

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    The next castle we came to was Burg Reichenstein, again on the west bank of the Rhine, just south of the village of Trechtingshausen. Today part of this castle is a hotel and restaurant, and what a lovely place to stay it must be, at least in terms of location. It sits high above the village, with views of the river below and vineyards all around.

    A castle was first built here in the first part of the 11th century, although the exact date is unknown. It has been several times destroyed, but was always rebuilt in the same strategic location. The current building dates mainly from the late 19th century, when it was constructed as a residence for the Kirsch-Puricellis family (one of the richest families of Europe). The restoration was based on old foundation drawings and on views of the castle from the 17th and 18th centuries, so its present appearance is much as it would have been several hundred years ago. Reichenstein remained in the family's possession for over 90 years until it was sold in 1987. As well as the hotel and restaurant, a museum on the site tells the story of the castle’s many incarnations.

    Burg Reichenstein
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    4] St Clement’s Chapel

    by toonsarah Updated Aug 1, 2010

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    Near Burg Rheinstein is the lovely little chapel of St Clement or Clemenskapelle, right by the water’s edge. The story of this chapel is quite gruesome in its way. Towards the end of the 13th century the Emperor Rudolphus of Habsburg was determined to put an end to the domination of the robber barons, and to do so lay waste to their castles on the Rhine, burning them to the ground and killing the barons by hanging them on a tree, as a dreadful warning to others.

    Local people, long persecuted by the barons, were naturally delighted that the emperor was taking action against them, but the relatives of the barons, their mothers, their wives and their daughters, equally naturally were distraught. They were worried too that with the men-folk dead, those who had been persecuted would rise against them. They took the bodies and buried them on consecrated ground, and to atone for their sins used the wood from the trees on which they had been hanged, and stones from the smoking ruins of the burning castles, to build this chapel of expiation on the execution site. On the day of its consecration the bodies of those who had been hanged were disinterred and brought here on funeral barges. The Archbishop of Mainz absolved the bodies from their sins, and afterwards they were all reinterred together near the little chapel.

    St Clement���s Chapel
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    3] Rheinstein Castle

    by toonsarah Written Aug 1, 2010

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    Burg Rheinstein lies on the west bank of the Rhine midway between Bingen and Trechtingshausen, and was one of the first castles we saw as we sailed north from Rüdesheim. It was constructed in around 1316, and like most of the Rhine castles was built in a strategic location for the defence of lands belonging to local feudal lords. But its initial glories were short-lived, as it quickly fell into decline. During the first part of the 19th century, when this region was discovered by the world and its castles lauded as perfect images of the new romantic sensibilities, Rheinstein was bought and rebuilt by Prince Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig of Prussia. Today it is the home of the Hecher family, and is open to the public.

    We loved Rheinstein because it was our first glimpse of the Disney-esque castles we all, but especially my mother in law, had come to see. Later we were to see more even more dramatically situated and multi-turreted edifices, but this was our first, and special for that reason.

    Burg Rheinstein
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    2] Rüdesheim am Rhein

    by toonsarah Written Aug 1, 2010

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    This was the one town where we managed to spend a fair amount of time, as we moored here twice and were able to go ashore both times. The weather was very hot, and my mother in law tired from the journey, so we didn’t do the optional excursion here on our first day, which would have taken us to a wine-tasting and to the famous Mechanical Music Museum. But Chris and I enjoyed wandering its picturesque streets on our first visit, and all of us spent an evening here on our second visit, meeting a friend for dinner and a few drinks.

    I have made a separate page about the town, whose highlights for me included the sympathetically restored church of St Jakobus in the main square, the picturesque half-timbered houses with traditionally painted walls, and the riverside park with its wine stall and views across the Rhine to the Rochuskapelle on the opposite hillside.

    We also, like every tourist here, took a walk along the famous Drosselgasse, a 144-metre-long narrow cobblestone street which dates back to the 15th century. Lined with restaurants and bars, it is very busy and touristy, but manages to retain its character nevertheless.

    From Rüdesheim we sailed north along the “Romantic Rhine”, and my following tips describe some of the castles and other sights we saw from the vantage point of our ship’s sun-deck There is a good map showing all of these and more here ....

    Adlerturm, R��desheim Typical building in R��desheim St Jakobus Church, R��desheim View from R��desheim
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    1] A cruise on the Rhine

    by toonsarah Updated Aug 1, 2010

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    Our cruise was booked through a specialist agency, Bluewater, and was with Croisi Europe, a French cruise company. Consequently the trip started and ended in Strasbourg, France. Our ship was the "La Bohème", and our route took us first north from Strasbourg, leaving on the evening we boarded and sailing through the night to arrive in Rüdesheim am Rhein in the early afternoon. After spending the rest of the day and night there, we sailed after breakfast to follow the Rhine through the stretch often called the “Romantic Rhine”, because of the very many beautiful old castles that line the river here. We arrived in Koblenz just after lunch and moored in the Moselle, which meets the Rhine here (Koblenz means confluence).

    The next day we sailed again at breakfast time and retraced our route through the “Romantic Rhine” back to Rüdesheim in time for lunch. From there we went on a coach excursion (an optional extra) to Eberbach Monastery. The ship left Rüdesheim in the early hours of the next morning (there was a 2.30 AM “curfew” for anyone who had gone ashore for the evening, if they wanted to avoid missing the boat!) and docked in Mannheim from where we took another optional excursion, this time to Heidelberg. As soon as we were back on board, at about 6.00 PM, we sailed for Strasbourg, where we arrived and disembarked the next morning – the end of a lovely cruise.

    Chris on the sun deck of La Boh��me
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    Meddersheim

    by christine.j Written Jul 6, 2010

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    Unless you're a wine connoisseur, chances are high that you've never heard of Meddersheim. It is very small village in the Nahe region of Rheinland-Pfalz, but produces a very good wine. We have family ties thereand this was also the reason for our visit in June. Needless to say, we also stopped at a winery and bought some boxes of Meddersheim wine.

    Have a look at the first picture, it's the city hall of Meddersheim, a grand name for such a small building.The bell on top of the roof was used to alert the people in case of fire.

    The second picture shows the church, a mixture of different building periods, from 1200 to 1756. I loved the paintings inside, a biblical picture book in the times when people couldn't read or write.

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    A visit back in time- a Museum of old Dolls

    by christine.j Updated Jul 6, 2010

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    Close to Bernkastel-Kues at the river Mosel there is an old nunnery, which has been transformed into more worldly buildings, restaurants, a brewery, a shop and a very interesting museum for old toys and religious icons.

    The people who take care of this museum really care for it, the exhibitions are put together lovingly and logically. Too often I've seen it in museums that their items have just been dumped together, without any logic. Here this is different, and it is very enjoying to walk along the show cases and look at the small worlds put together. On the walls there are painting of the original owners of many of the dolls and teddies.

    In a big, extra room there are religioius icons on display, some made of valuable materials, others looked like they had been made by children. One of these reminded me of a story I once read, about two children trying to make an icon for their Russian friend, to stop her from being homesick. In this story the children used golden candy wrappers.

    I liked this museum and I wouln't mind going again.

    Entrance fee is 3 Euro for an adult.

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