Amphitheater, Trier

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  • underground passages
    underground passages
    by doug48
  • roman amphitheater
    roman amphitheater
    by doug48
  • Amphitheater
    by Askla
  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Amphitheater

    by antistar Updated Oct 15, 2013

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    Amphitheater, Trier
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    Built in 100AD, this very large amphitheater is the oldest surviving Roman building in Trier. It's big, with a historical capacity of over 20,000 people, but it's not as impressive as the Amphitheater of Nimes. That's because despite being a similar size, it's not a building, but dug out of the slopes of Petrisberg just outside of the city. Because of that, and because of the grassy slopes that hide the seats, and the clutter of modern stages and stadium seating, you can only really get a sense of what it must have been like here two thousand years ago. Back then they wouldn't have been listening to Bach on balmy summer nights, but instead enjoying the howls of exotic wild animals as they fought against gladiators and Christians.

    Actually I found it slightly annoying that they charged me full price to enter the amphitheater when so much crap was filling it up for the performance later that night.

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    The Amphitheater.

    by Askla Updated Dec 29, 2012
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    Entering the Amphitheater you will walk through the ruins of the entrance gate. This was used as a quarry in the Middle Ages. The arena itself (built in the last third of the 2nd century) is surrounded by a protecting wall with openings for animal cages. It had a seating capacity of 18-20.000 spectators. Underneath the arena is a vast cellar where the death sentenced prisoners were kept in cells side by side with the wild animals they should fight with. A moveable platform took them up to the arena for the final fight.

    In 1211 were the people from the nearby monastery in Himmerod allowed to use the stone from the theater as building material for the building of their houses.

    Since the Amphitheater has very good acoustic, it sees occasional open-air concerts and also the Antiquity Festival (proof of this can be seen in my pictures).

    Opening hours:
    April - September: daily 9:00 - 18:00
    October and March: daily 9:00 - 17:00
    November - February: daily 9:00 - 16:30

    Entrance fees:
    Adults: 3 Euro
    Children 6 - 17 years: 1,50 Euro
    Pensioners and students over 18: 2,10 Euro.

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  • drei3t's Profile Photo

    The great amphitheater

    by drei3t Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Amphitheater in Trier is quite convincing sight. It is big area built 2000 years ago, and where Romans organized people vs lions fights. 20000 spectators took care that the atmosphere must have been unbelievable.

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  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    Roman Amphitheater

    by Tom_Fields Written Mar 13, 2009

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    The Roman amphitheater
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    This theater dates back to 100 AD, making it the oldest surviving Roman structure in the city. It could hold up to about 20,000. In the 19th century much of the stone was taken away for other uses, but the remainder of it is still used for performances. Modern changes have made it difficult to see what it originally looked like.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    amphitheater

    by doug48 Updated Sep 10, 2008

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    underground passages

    when visiting the amphitheater be sure to see the underground passages. it is here were the gladitors would prepare for their fights and where wild animals were caged. much of the stone work of the amphitheater was removed during the middle ages so the underground passages are the most interesting sites to see.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    amphitheater

    by doug48 Written Jun 12, 2008

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    roman amphitheater

    the amphitheater is the oldest roman structure in trier. over 20,000 spectators could watch gladiators and wild animal fights. when constantine defeated the franks in 307AD he captured two of the frankish kings ascaric and merogaisus. ascaric and merogaisus were fed to wild animals in the amphitheater.

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  • Segolily's Profile Photo

    The roman amphitheater

    by Segolily Updated Mar 3, 2008

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    This was a little longer walk than the rest of the town sites. It was up the hill outside of the old roman town. I was interested in comparing it to the small amphitheater we had visited in Wales. This was two or three times larger and would have been great to wonder around in. However it is being used for theatricals and our wanderings were limited to the top. There was a stage up and the actors were rehearsing. What fun it would be to attend one of these plays, sitting in the same places the Romans did, with however the benefit of microphones and sound systems.

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    Amphitheatre - Panem et circenses

    by Elena77 Written Dec 3, 2007

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    Trier amphitheatre
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    Any respectable Roman city needed an amphitheatre and so Trier does, of course, have one too. It was built around 100 AD with a capacity of 20,000 people and replaced an earlier, wooden construction.
    The amphitheatre was a site of entertainment and distraction for the Romans and the local population of Trier: animals were hounded, gladiators fought, public executions took place and important announcements were proclaimed. Under the arena there was a cellar that has been preserved and can be visited today. There also was a hidden (elevator-like) movable platform in the middle of the theatre enabling gladiators or animals to appear in a fast and surprising way. The amphitheatre also did have an unusual additional feature: it served as the Western city gate of Trier.
    Today there are guided tours taking place during Summer. An actor dressed as "Gladiator Valerius" explains the arena's functions and conveys impressions on the life of ancient gladiators.
    In August Germany's biggest "Roman Festival" is held at Trier and the amphitheatre again becomes a scene of gladiator's fights. Sometimes also concerts or other events take place at this site.

    Opening hours:
    April - September: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
    October: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    November - February: 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
    March: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    Note:
    Last admission 30 minutes before closing.
    For security reasons, the Amphitheater may be closed in dangerous weather (ice and snow).

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  • Binegars1990's Profile Photo

    Amphitheater

    by Binegars1990 Updated Oct 24, 2006

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    Over 20,000 spectators once jammed the terraces of the oldest Roman structure in Trier to watch the gladiators fight, a form of spectacle that continued into the Christian era. Be sure to climb down into the cellars under the areana, and examine theside chambers that served as cages. Much of the stone work was exploited as a quarry during the Middle Ages, but enough remains to imagine yourself back in the 1st century AD, when it was built.

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  • Amphitheater

    by ger4444 Written Mar 14, 2006

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    Situated a bit outside the center of the town, near the winefarmers hills, you find the most extended roman construction of Trier, that is the Amphitheater. Build in the year 100, it contains 20.000 seats! Its constructed upto the surrounding hills and its well perserved. The catacomben are still intact and are open to public. You can enter the upper parts of the seats by caves and tunnel, steps lead up to the top of the amphitheater giving you a great view on the roman theater. Its of course a little bit touched by nature nowadays since there is grass growing everywere and the original seats are nearly visible yet it gives a good impression of the old days of the roman Empire.

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  • wayne0k's Profile Photo

    The Emperor's view of the Amphitheater

    by wayne0k Written Apr 18, 2005

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    The Emperor's view of the Amphitheater

    From this vantage point we can view the arena, much like the Emperor and his guests of distinction would have been able to do, far above the fray.

    The Arena floor is actually supported by an extensive timber structure built nearly 4 meters below ground level.

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    The Amphitheater Entrance

    by wayne0k Written Apr 18, 2005

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    The Amphitheater Entrance

    Just a few minutes walk outside of the walled city of Trier, now in the Village of Olweg, is the Roman Amphitheater. This structure was built around 100 CE. The arena was used for "games" of blood sport among both men and animals. Nearly 20,000 spectators could be seated, most of whom would pass through an entrance like this one.

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  • Polly74's Profile Photo

    Amphiteater

    by Polly74 Updated Apr 5, 2005

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    Entrance

    The Amphitheater in Trier
    is on the UNESCO`s list of World Heritage. It lies beyond the medieval city wall. Cruel games with animal and gladiator combats were conducted here popular public entertainment.

    When you enter the premises you walk through the ruins of the entrance gate. This was used as a quarry in the Middle Ages. The arena itself is surrounded by a protecting wall with openings for animal cages.

    The arena, built in the 2nd century A.D. for cruel games with gladiators and animals, had a seating capacity of about 20,000.

    With its crystal-clear acoustics, the Amphitheatre serves as a venue for the Antiquity Festival and is used today for occasional open-air concerts.

    Underneath the arena is a vast cellar where, in Roman times, prisoners sentenced to death were kept alongside exotic wild animals like African lions or Asian tigers.

    A moveable platform took them up to the arena for the final show-down.

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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    Amphitheatre

    by smschley Updated Mar 19, 2005

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    The Amphitheatre, on the outskirts of the modern, as well as the Roman town, was built into the very slope of the Petrisberg, not far away from the Weinlehrpfad. This prestigious building was built around 100 AD and richly decorated during the following centuries. You can go underneath part of the Amphitheatre to where some of the gladiators waited and see where many waited for their death. Once on the Amphitheatre floor you could look around and see the tunnels and rooms where animals and other gladiators entered from. It was somewhat unnerving knowing that people fought and died where you were standing for amusement of others.

    Its western half held the imperial box and seats reserved for high-ranking civil servants. Its main entrances, to the north and south, had originally been provided with magnificent facades with ample space for three passages and vaulted entrances. On its western side, two smaller doors led upwards and to the tiers.

    The arena had room for roughly 20,000 people .In the 4th and 5th centuries spectators could watch the often bloody spectacles unfold from the sloped spectator stands. . Its size means it is the tenth largest among the 70 preserved ancient amphitheatres. In the walls, there are openings into stone chambers that served to accommodate people and animals. Beneath the arena are the cellar rooms where the necessary equipment and backdrops for the performances were kept

    The Amphitheatre was at the same time a town gateway, so that the north entrance laid inside and the south entrance outside the town walls. The gate structures and the remaining walls were used for quarrying in the Middle Ages and also later on.

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  • Ewingjr98's Profile Photo

    Roman Amphitheater

    by Ewingjr98 Written Sep 9, 2004

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    Amphitheater looking north

    The Amphitheater is the oldest existing construction in Trier; it was built by the Romans in 100 AD. Though originally built to seat 20,000+ people, there are no seats, just grassy hills showing the outline of the massive structure. You can also walk under the dirt floor of the amphitheater to where animals and slaves must have been kept prior to their fights. There are also 12 cages along the outer walls for man and beast.

    In later years, the Romans incorporated the city walls into the amphitheater, and the gates to this structure became additional gates to the city.

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