Fun things to do in Trier

  • Things to Do
    by leics
  • Things to Do
    by leics
  • Things to Do
    by leics

Most Viewed Things to Do in Trier

  • mustertal's Profile Photo

    Let the Train take the Strain

    by mustertal Updated Feb 7, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If your time is limited, then why not take the Romer Express, this little train runs around the city, taking you past most of the ancient remains, and, most of the sites the City has on offer.
    The trip takes 35 minutes, you'll see, Karl Marks birth place, the Roman baths and the Amphitheatre.
    The train runs every 25 minutes April - October
    and every hour March - November.
    Adults €6 (2007 prices).
    Child €3
    Family €15 ( 2 adults + 3 children). (2007 prices)

    Romer Express

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    The you know what....

    by Maryimelda Updated Jan 22, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When we think of Paris, we think of the Eiffel Tower. When we think of Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber, we think of the Ploenlein, Zermatt- The Matterhorn, Strasbourg- the Cathedral, Heidelberg-The Castle and Trier the Porta Nigra. This ancient remnant of the Roman wall is the black gate that leads to most of the fabulously interesting historical sites of Germany's oldest city. No need to give you its history or dimensions, you will have heard it all. I will just present some of my photos and my thoughts on the Porta Nigra which can be relayed quite simply - you have to be there to feel and see the enormity of this structure. It is quite an experience believe me.

    Front Inside Rear From down the street Adjacent buildings in front
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    The Treasury in the Dom

    by Maryimelda Updated Jan 22, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For 1.50 euro, you can see some of the most astonishing sacred vessels and church treasures in Germany. Centrepiece is the Altar of St Andrew topped with a huge golden foot. Here too, is displayed what is thought to be one of the nails of the crucifixion of Christ. Unfortunately my photo of the Holy Nail was accidentally deleted much to my horror, but then never mind, I'll just have to go back and get another .

    Anassortment of monstrances The Grosbert Censer Chalices, ciboria and other altar vessels Madonna and Child
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    St George's Fountain

    by Maryimelda Written Jan 23, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Right outside the Post Office located in the Kornmarkt at the far end of the Hauptmarkt, you will find the most beautiful Baroque Fountain you are ever likely to see. The Fountain of St George features the man himself of course, slaying the dragon. The four seasons are depicted in the figures at the foot of the fountain.

    St Georgbrunnen
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    Domstadt (Cathedral City)

    by Maryimelda Written Jan 23, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The precinct around the Dom is known as Cathedral City. It is a fascinating area with buildings dating back 800 years or more. Many of the buildings are contained behind very high ornamental walls. These walls were built using recycled Roman materials and bear Latin inscriptions and coats of arms.

    The area behind the Cathedral and the Liebfrauenkirche is particularly attractive and should not be missed.

    Entry to Domstadt High Walls.... Area behind the Churches Rear walkway between the churches Rear view where the Dom joins Liebfrauenkirche
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    The Church of St Anthony

    by Maryimelda Updated Jan 24, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The church of St Anthony was built in the grounds of the Capuchin Monastery between 1458 and 1514. The monastery no longer exists. The Church features a very spectacular rococco pulpit which was relocated from the Dominican monastery near the Dom, when the monastery was demolished in 1812. It features sculptures of the Evangelists and some of the more prominent dignitaries of the Dominican Order.

    St Anthony's
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • terps94's Profile Photo

    pink palace

    by terps94 Updated Feb 19, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located right next to the Basilika is the Electoral Palace, considered one of the most beautiful rococo palaces in the world. It is still used as an administrative building so visiting inside is by appointment only
    During summer time concerts are held in the south wing of the palace...

    Was this review helpful?

  • kokoryko's Profile Photo

    A beautiful park, in front of . . . . .

    by kokoryko Written Jun 16, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A beautiful park, in front of a baroque and rococo palace

    When you go from the imperial thermal bath to the Kurfürstenschloß (Prince Elector palace) you pass through a very calm, beautifully laid out garden, where young people have a rest on the meadows, can admire the perspectives along long narrow alleys bordered by hornbeams or yews, high walls covered with ivy, reflections in the basins, white statues aligned, or dispersed here or there. . . . . . it is a short walk and a feast for the eyes loving green and white; the pink a bit glazed sugar cake-like palace at the end of the perspectives gives a special charm to the walk.

    View across a basin I like trees in the parks. . . Vegetal arch Rococo facade from far Arriving to the palace
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • kokoryko's Profile Photo

    The renovated thermal imperial bathes.

    by kokoryko Updated Jun 16, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The imperial thermal baths of Trier have been built in the 4th century, but only a few ruins are left. I am not fond of “plastic surgery” with old buildings, but the area has been renovated (in 2007) in a apparently interesting way, mixing modern architectural concepts to the old roman site; square shaped brick columns, on meadows, a modern glass building displaying artefacts found in the area, public displays, that may give some character to the site; I liked the view of modern architecture with the old ruins. We walked around the place, as it was closed, and enjoyed the view of the ruins from the Prince Elector’s palace garden (picture 4)

    General view Glass built museum Entrance View from the palace garden
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • kokoryko's Profile Photo

    Façade of the Schloß (palace).

    by kokoryko Written Jun 16, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The palace of the Prince Elector as we see it today was erected between 1615 and 1676, in late Renaissance style, next to an old basilica; the works were very long, and were carried out wing after wing in order to finish in a square shaped palace with a wide inner yard. As it was closed, I had a look at the rococo wing facing the garden. My Indonesian friend made the remark it looks a bit like a strawberry cake, but it is worth to have a stop there and look at the statues laden façade; I like a lot the façade from far with balanced asymmetry (picture 2); of course there are little angels, enjoying grapes or hunting, and many more. . . . the last picture shows a detail of the fronton, laden with angels, naiads, etc. . .

    Rococo decor above the walls Strawberry cake? Angels and grapes (we are in the Mosel Valley!) The little hunters Statue and facade
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Skipka's Profile Photo

    Inside the Dome

    by Skipka Updated Nov 8, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When you enter the Dome you will stay breathless. There is wonderful barrocco decoration of the one part where is a crypt on the way. If you want to enjoy view then later be careful neck ache should arise because the rich decoration is all around you to the top of the roof.

    THis beautiful Cathedral contains the mix of styles beginning by Roman through centuries of enlargement and improvements. Its central section is Roman with the original walls that are 26 metres high and probably they are from 5-9 CT AD.

    What I love about this Cathedral is as I mentioned in the first paragraph decorations and amazing organ in the main part of the Cathedral and the atmopshere itself when there is absolutely no people :) There is also a treasure : Holy robe of Jesus that you can see by yourself if you are lucky and the place is opened for public.

    a view from outside detail of Crypt decorations organ The place where is the holy Robe inside
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    Day Trip to Saarburg

    by Maryimelda Updated Mar 20, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Saarburg is a breathtaking little town which can be seen in an afternoon by train from Trier. The feature of Saarburg is the waterfall which is located right in the middle of the town and is beautifully adorned with flowers of every colour and variety available. The town has a wonderful history as well and has many well kept reminders of its historical past.
    Walk from the train station to the town. It seems like a long way but it really isn't far at all and there is much to see along the way and of course many pics to take. You are welcome to visit my Saarburg page to see more of it in detail.

    The wonderful waterfall Colourful little streets
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    St Helen in the Dom

    by Maryimelda Written Jul 7, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is a truly beautiful statue of St Helen who was the mother of Constantine I. St Helen is beleieved to have found the relic of the True Cross and is also credited with bringing back the Holy Robe (believed to be the robe worn by Christ at his crucifixion) to Trier. Her statue stands at the foot of the stairs in the Cathedral leading up to the vault where the Holy Robe is housed.

    St Helen
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • kokoryko's Profile Photo

    Lots of statues in the palace garden

    by kokoryko Written Jun 16, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Take a few minutes to have a close look at the statues; most of them are marble statues, some are plaster, but this is not important, the most important is the setting, the way they are emphasised, the perspectives they show, and their bright white colour, in the green surroundings. Some look like if they watch the palace, and look proud with the perspectives of the rococo façade of the palace behind them.
    Most of the statues are creations of Ferdinand Tietz (1708-1777), nicknamed “Master of Franken Rococo”, and in fact he is very well known for his masterpieces in Würtzburg and Bamberg where he spent a big part of his life. He is famous for his little angels and hunting scenes, and the décor of a famous bridge in Bamberg; he came to Trier when Prince Elector Franz Georg von Schönborn called him to renovate his palace and lay out the park.
    I like the little angels of picture 2
    On picture 3 you can see justice and a representation of wisdom is on picture 4Other virtues are reflecting in the basin on picture 5.

    Welcome too loud !!! Justice Wisdom An alley of virtues (I'am not there. . . :)
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • kokoryko's Profile Photo

    If you do not see this, you do not see Trier!

    by kokoryko Updated Jun 17, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In every history book, in every pictures book about Germany, there is a picture of the Porta Nigra; I do not derogate from the rule and show here a few pictures of this universally known building. We arrived late afternoon and could not visit inside, from where we could have had a view over the city.
    The Porta Nigra (called locally, Porta) has been erected around 200 AD, on the northern side of huge fortifications surrounding Augusta Treverum; very few remains from the fortifications, and in 1802 Napoleon decided to destroy the buildings (houses and a basilica dedicated to the Greek monk Simeon) which were later built near the Porta Nigra. “Thanks” to him, we can see today the Porta Nigra cleared from nearby houses and have the view of the Porta Nigra in all its impressive splendour! Porta Nigra got its name from the huge dark limestone blocks which it is built with; it is (with other Roman monuments of Trier) on the UNESCO world heritage list since 1986.
    It is really an impressive building, massive and in the same time quite “aerial”, with all the arches on the three (four with the towers) levels.
    The main picture shows Porta Nigra from the city (inner) side, late afternoon. The vast plaza was almost empty when we arrived only some special tourists were there. . . . (picture 2); the outer side is as impressive as the inner side, with the view through the arches (picture 3).
    The fourth picture, taken on the side of the house sheltering the tourist information office, on the left side, when you look at the Porta Nigra from the city (inner side) shows a plate dedicated to Simeon, the Greek monk who lived as an ascetic hermit in a room of the Porta Nigra in the 11th century, famous for his friendship with archbishop Poppo, and who has been canonised by Pope Benedict IX.
    The last picture, taken around 10 am, when I wanted to have a look inside, may give you an idea of how popular the place is, and, these mass tourists wearing badges or name-tags just chased me away. . . . . In order of not getting stupidly angry, or making poor brain inspired remarks, I thought I have choice between killing all of them, or leaving the place; I took the second option. . . . . . haha, and kept in good mood for the day! :-)))
    Seriously, about crowds. . . . Of course, people travel the way they want to travel, join herds if they want to join herds; I cannot join herds myself, I respect them and just go my way. . . . . and do not mind. . . . . . (And, if I am able to change my mind, I won’t change myself . . . . ).

    View from the city side Visitors ? (Simeon's adepts? ) View from the outer side Plaque to Simeon Visitors. . .
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Trier Hotels

See all 49 Hotels in Trier

Latest Trier Hotel Reviews

Golden Tulip Trier
29 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jun 8, 2014
Hotel Roemerbruecke
29 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: May 31, 2014
Park Plaza Trier
137 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 21, 2014
Zum Christophel Hotel-Restaurant
24 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jun 9, 2014
Hotel Monopol
15 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jun 11, 2014
Stadtwald Hotel
22 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 18, 2014
Altstadt Hotel
19 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jan 1, 2014
Jugendgästehaus Trier
4 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 30, 2013
Villa Hugel
145 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 21, 2014
Mercure Hotel Trier Porta Nigra
126 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 21, 2014
Romischer Kaiser
70 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jul 19, 2014
Hotel Paulin
19 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: May 24, 2014
Hotel Garni Casa Chiara
48 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Jun 24, 2014
Nh Trier
1 Review & Opinion
Petrisberg
36 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 23, 2014

Instant Answers: Trier

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

77 travelers online now

Comments

Trier Things to Do

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Trier locals.
Map of Trier