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  • Altstadt (Old Town)
    by Kathrin_E
  • Fairytale wedding in Dresden
    Fairytale wedding in Dresden
    by balhannah
  • Fairytale wedding in Dresden
    Fairytale wedding in Dresden
    by balhannah

Most Viewed Favorites in Dresden

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    FAIRYTALE WEDDING IN DRESDEN

    by balhannah Written Dec 1, 2013

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    Favorite thing: How lucky was I to witness a beautiful bride with a Cinderella pumpkin coach, this one made out of glass or plastic!
    The Bride & Groom hadn't long emerged from the beautiful Frauenkirche. Outside, waiting for them was the Horse and carriage, then a couple more double decker Carriages for the guests. I think there were just as many tourists gathered around as there were guests.
    What a beautiful mode of transport for a wedding!

    Fairytale wedding in Dresden Fairytale wedding in Dresden Fairytale wedding in Dresden Fairytale wedding in Dresden Fairytale wedding in Dresden
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    SPRING WAS IN THE AIR!

    by balhannah Written Oct 18, 2013

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    Favorite thing: Spring, and in my mind, I conjour up a picture of Spring bulbs in flower and Trees full of blossom.
    I was in Dresden the end of April, unfortunately, Winter was very late this year, so a lot of the Trees still hadn't come out in leaf. It wasn't high season, so Dresden wasn't over-run with tourist's, and the weather was good, just a little cool.
    I found quite a few trees that were a real picture, including a variety of Magnolia trees, these were stunning. Daffodils were out in flower everywhere, a flower I love to pick and put inside. For me, travelling in Spring is one of the best times!

    Dresden Dresden Dresden - White Magnolia Dresden Dresden - Daffodils
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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    A walk in the Friedrichstadt district

    by german_eagle Updated Sep 8, 2013

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    Favorite thing: After you saw the major sights, or if you just want to get away from the major tourist paths, I suggest you go for a walk in one of the districts outside the city centre of Dresden. Many of those districts do not exactly offer things you "must see" or "must do", but are interesting in their own way. The historic Friedrichstadt is one of those districts.

    You can either walk from the old town along the river to Marienbrücke or you take tram #6 or #11 to the stop "Kongresszentrum". Both places are next to the mosque-like building of the former cigarette plant "Yenidze", where you start the Friedrichstadt walk.

    The original name of the place was "Ostra", first mentioned as the slavic village "Ostrov" (meaning "island") in 1206. In 1568 all the people of Ostra had to move to a new village in the outskirts of the opposite end of the city, named "Neuostra", nowadays the district "Leubnitz-Neuostra", upon order of elector duke August, while the grounds of the old Ostra were used for farming, to feed the duke's court in Dresden.

    The area close to the Elbe river stayed farmland for centuries, but in 1670 a new village was founded on the grounds closer to the old town of Dresden, renamed "Friedrichstadt" in 1734 after elector duke Friedrich August II. In 1835 it became part of the municipality Dresden. Along the main street, Friedrichstraße, magnificent buildings were erected, like the palais Brühl-Marcolini, Matthäus church, Baroque townhouses. From the second half of the 19th century on the district became more and more an industrial area, lots of railroads etc. were built. In the bombing in 1945 about 440 buildings were completely destroyed, not many were rebuilt. Thus the whole Friedrichstadt looks like a rag rug nowadays, with beautiful buildings next to industrial (but nonetheless interesting) areas (like the harbour) and nice gardens/parks. If you like, you may follow me on the walk through this district. It starts with Yenidze. At the bottom of every tip you find a link to the next station on the walk.

    I'd like to thank my friend Nemorino for giving me permission for using his concept of "walks" with the linked tips. Check out his famous Paris page!

    Yenidze view from Tr��mmerberg hill view of the harbour from Tr��mmerberg hill Palais Br��hl-Marcolini garden of Palais Br��hl-Marcolini
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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Some Reading Tips on Dresden

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 25, 2013

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    Favorite thing: A note first: Not all of these books are (yet) available in English. So these tips will be most interesting for those of you who read German. Some are, though - I will mention the English title if I find it.

    Erich Kästner: Als ich ein kleiner Junge war
    English title: When I Was A Little Boy
    Autobiography of one of Germany's best ever authors of children's books about his own childhood in pre-war Dresden.
    For those of you who learn German as a foreign language, Kästner is comparatively easy to read, so give him a try.

    Karl Ludwig Freiherr von Pöllnitz: Das galante Sachsen
    English title: La Saxe Galante or, The Amorous Adventures and Intrigues of Frederick-Augustus II
    Gossip from the court of August the Strong, written down by one of his courtiers. There are several modern editions of this early 18th century manuscript which gives a deep insight into life at the baroque Saxon court.

    Wolfgang Berghofer: Meine Dresdner Jahre
    No English translation available(?)
    Autobiography of Dresden's last GDR mayor who lead the city until 1990. Life in the GDR and the Socialist party apparatus, and how someone who believed in socialism begins to see and learn about the system's flaws, mistakes and problems that lead to its breakdown, and his role in the revolution of 1989. Written from his personal point of view, other participants will interpret the happenings in a different way, but this is his truth. Interesting.

    (to be continued)

    Fondest memory: Uwe Tellkamp: Der Turm
    The book has in the meantime been translated into several languages, but I cannot find trace of an English translation yet. As the author keeps winning prize after prize for this book since its publication in 2008, I'd expect one soon.

    The story of a family in Dresden during the last years of the GDR. A family who lives in Weißer Hirsch, a quarter where bourgeoisie has survived, people who seek their refuge in classical music and memories of old Dresden. People who live their private lives despite the system and have no idea how dangerous their situation is. Three protagonists: the father, a doctor, the uncle, lecturer and author and in touch with the communist aristocracy, and the adolescent son, first at school and then in the army and in jail. There is a lot of autobiographical material in it but it is a novel, not a report.

    Reading the German original requires profoundest knowledge of the German language and a long breath, it contains almost 1000 pages. It is hard work, though rewarding. This book has deeply impressed me.

    Tellkamp is currently working on a sequel, to be entitled Lava, that continues the story of the family in the years after 1989. It's going to be at least as bulky as Der Turm so we'll have to wait patiently for its appearance. The author recently moved back to Weißer Hirsch with his family and is now working in the setting of his novel.
    For specialists, there are guided tours through Weißer Hirsch which focus on the novel, show and explain the locations mentioned in the novel: http://www.hochtouren-dresden.de

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Risen from ashes

    by Raimix Updated Jan 25, 2013

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    Favorite thing: As Dresden was one of towns, who got big amount of USA - Great Britain's bombs in Second World War, nowadays it is raised as phoenix. Place was highly damaged, as it happened with such cities as Berlin or Warsaw. Restorations started already in times of former country of DDR.

    Nowadays everything or almost everything is rebuilt in former glory. It is as always strange to walk and to know that most sights are like new, but rebuilt on old basis.

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    Homo sovieticus

    by Raimix Written Dec 30, 2012

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    Favorite thing: I was hosted by local CS member in Dresden for 1 night, the first day we had a nice walk from newer suburb to old town. I was amazed to see the same type of Soviet houses, as I usually see in Vilnius. Anyway, these in Dresden were already modernized, painted in not so boring colors.

    Historical facts tell that Dresden and East Germany was a part of DDR, a satellite state of Soviet Union. As Dresden was quite damaged in Second World War, some „beautiful“ Soviet style architecture was risen here.

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    Royal city feeling

    by Raimix Written Dec 30, 2012

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    Favorite thing: Saxon territory was quite powerful and modern in the period of baroque, baroque influences came from Italy and was visible in most of life aspects – not only in new people fashion, but also in architecture. So, Dresden, as capital of Saxon State, was quite rich and stood as example for other towns or countries.

    Walking the streets it is possible to feel that place was (is) powerful, rich, and sometimes too full with detailed architecture.

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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Hanging out by the river

    by german_eagle Written Aug 5, 2012

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    Favorite thing: One of Dresden's most appealing features are the large, unspoiled river banks that you'll hardly find anywhere else in a European city. Locals (and tourists) make good use of the green meadows by hanging out there on mild days. In summer the favourite places are the meadows down by the river on the Neustadt side, across from the old town. From there you have the best views of the old town silhouette with the historic buildings - ev-Lutheran Frauenkirche and catholic Hofkirche dominating the scenery.

    Picture 1 shows the view from Brühl's Terrace (old town) downstream, a couple of hours before sunset.

    If you're lucky you can see hot-air ballons. The pictures 2-4 were taken on a Wednesday in early August 2012, standing at Brühl's Terrace with view of the above mentioned meadows on the Neustadt side of the river. Friends of mine have done such balloon rides and continue to rave about that adventure - I am planning to do it once.

    Picture 5 was taken from a paddle steamer upstream from the old town.

    Related to:
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    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Relics of old villages all over the city

    by german_eagle Updated Apr 8, 2012

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    Favorite thing: Regarding ground area Dresden is the fourth largest city in Germany (about 328 km2) but it has a population of only about 523,000 people (ranked 11th). The city is spread out along the wide Elbe river valley and the hillsides.

    More than 100 old villages were incorporated into the city over the centuries. Many of them - more than in any other German city - kept at least in their old centres some old architecture (farm houses) and structures (small alleys, gardens with fruit trees, fountains etc.) so that they still have an almost rural ambience. Quite surprisingly this preserved rural ambience is not only to find in the outskirts of Dresden but also very close to the centre. Watch out for street names starting with Alt- (Old-) which are pretty good indications of of a preserved old village centre.

    A very nice example is Strehlen, just south of Großer Garten and only 10-15 minutes by tram or bus from the old town. It is mostly a very beautiful residential area with villas in Art Nouveau and Historistic style, but along and around the street Altstrehlen you find old farmhouses, cobbled alleys, gardens. Also very nice are Altseidnitz, Altpestitz, Altplauen e.g. which are in similar distance from the city centre.

    My favourites are in the northeastern (Loschwitz, Wachwitz, Laubegast) and western districts (Übigau, Kaditz, Briesnitz) of Dresden, all of them along the river. Some of them still have their old parish churches which are worth to see (Loschwitz, Briesnitz, Kaditz).

    old farmhouse in Dresden-Strehlen old houses in Dresden-Trachau farmhouses in Dresden-��bigau A timber-framed old house in Dresden-Wachwitz A farmhouse in Dresden-Pestitz
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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Top museums/galleries

    by german_eagle Updated Mar 10, 2012

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    Favorite thing: Here is a list of the most popular museums and galleries - in no particular order:

    - Picture Gallery "Old Masters"
    - New Green Vault
    - Historic Green Vault
    - Porcelain collection
    - Albertinum with Picture Gallery "New Masters" and Sculptures Collection
    - Armoury/Turkish chamber
    - Hygiene Museum
    - Military History Museum
    - City Museum with dependancies
    - Transportation museum

    My personal favourites - those at the top of the list aside - include some of the smaller museums, such as the summer house of composer Carl Maria von Weber (pic 5), the Kügelgen house and the book museum of the State Library. See my Off the beaten path tips and Schloss Pillnitz page also.

    Picture Gallery Old Masters, Sistine Madonna New Green Vault, the Moor with the Emerald Plate Porcelain collection, figurines Picture Gallery New Masters Carl-Maria-von-Weber-Museum
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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Top Gardens/Parks

    by german_eagle Updated Mar 10, 2012

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    Favorite thing: For recreation after some exhausting sightseeing, a short break between two sights or even as a sight itself - here is a list of the most beautiful gardens/parks in Dresden:

    - garden of Pillnitz Palace
    - Großer Garten
    - Bürgerwiese and Blüherpark
    - Riverside promenades (right bank from Rosengarten to garden of Japanese Palais)
    - garden on Brühl's Terrace
    - Park at the Zwinger
    - gardens of the Castles by the Elbe river (Albrechtsberg - Eckberg)
    - Wachwitzer Höhenpark (Rhododendron garden)
    - Waldpark Blasewitz
    - Fichte-Park in Dresden-Plauen
    - Alaunplatz
    - Volkspark Striesen
    - Beutlerpark

    Pillnitz Palace garden Gro��er Garten B��rgerwiese garden of Hotel Westin Bellevue Rosengarten (rosarium)

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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Upscale Residential Areas

    by german_eagle Written Mar 9, 2012

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    Favorite thing: Just like the centres of old villages are preserved, so are almost all of the upscale 19th century residential areas. Only few of them were hit by the bombs in 1945 - unfortunately some milestones of this kind of architecture were destroyed (Villa Rosa by Gottfried Semper e.g.) The so called Swiss quarter south of the main train station was pretty much damaged, the villas along Parkstraße and those of the English and American quarters are totally gone.

    My favourites are Strehlen, Blasewitz and Striesen on the left bank of the Elbe river, Loschwitz, Weißer Hirsch and the Prussian quarter on the right bank. Kleinzschachwitz is not bad, either.

    Take your time and stroll along the cobbled alleys with old street lights, beautiful villas and their well-kept gardens. Cafes and art galleries, fancy or not so fancy restaurants and shops are nice for a break.

    Art Nouveau villa (Wei��er Hirsch) Another typical villa (Wei��er Hirsch) Villa Ilgen (Blasewitz) Neo-Renaissance villa (Prussian quarter) Villa in Kleinzschachwitz
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    Schlosserland Saxon Card

    by BruceDunning Updated Dec 14, 2011

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    Favorite thing: This is a discount card to allow entry into castles, palaces and other sites in the Saxony region. It covers about 45 different major sites within a 50 mile radius form Dresden, and slight discounts n another 15 places.
    ONE BIG DRAWBACK FROM NOW ON IS-the card is not any longer valid for entry into the Zwinger Museums, which were free previously. That was a savings of around 30 Euro-but not anymore, and they did not publish that on the web site, nor send information about the change.

    Price is 38 Euro for an annual pass, or a 10 day pass sells for 20 Euro, but if you buy a second one, then that is only 15 Euro. The card is probably well worth the purchase if you plan to venture out and around to the surrounding sites; like we did

    Fondest memory: GEt the card at information center in Altmarket, or by the Zwinger also has them, or order online if you live in Europe they will mail it.

    This is the card issued
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    Dresden CArd

    by BruceDunning Updated Dec 10, 2011

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    Favorite thing: This is a card that allows access to 12 museums in and around the Zwinger museums, plus one at Pillnitz south. There are also reduced fees for entry into another 20 siytes, and discount bus fares. They only discount 10% for most places to see, or 1 Euro range.
    Cost for the card is 24 Euro for 2 days and 9,50 for one day per person. This compares to if you went into all museums separately, the cost may be closer to 48 Euro. However, you may not be able to take in all 12 museums in 2 days. A three day card is 75 Euro, and that is steep.
    Compare before you go. GEt them at information center in Altmarket area, or down at Zwinger counter downstairs.

    Fondest memory: http://www.dresden.de/dtg/en/ddcard.php

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    Elbe

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 13, 2011

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    Favorite thing: Shortly after crossing the Czech-German frontier, and passing through the sandstone defiles of the Elbe Sandstone Mountains, the stream assumes a north-westerly direction, which on the whole it preserves right to the North Sea.
    The river rolls through Dresden.

    You can watch my high resolution photo of Dresden on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 51° 3' 16.61" N 13° 44' 21.03" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Elbe.

    Elbe

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