Frauenkirche, Dresden

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  • Frauenkirche, interior cupola with frescos
    Frauenkirche, interior cupola with...
    by german_eagle
  • Excavations behind Kulturpalast, 2013
    Excavations behind Kulturpalast, 2013
    by Kathrin_E
  • The Neumarkt
    The Neumarkt
    by EasyMalc
  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    FRAUENKIRCHE - THE OUTSIDE

    by balhannah Written Dec 3, 2013

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    Frauenkirche

    The Frauenkirche is a sandstone octagonal church, quite different to what I am used to seeing.
    At the top is a massive circular sandstone Dome weighing an incredible 12,000 tonnes,. The Dome is 24metres high and has a diameter of 26metre and is quite unique as it has a curved base giving it a bell-like look, which is why the Frauenkirche was also nicknamed the ‘Stone Bell’.
    In the re-building, old and new sandstone blocks were used.

    The belfry is home to eight bells, each with a name and Bible verse dedicated to each Bell - this is an old tradition. One of the bells, " Maria," rang out in the services of the former Dresden Frauenkirche between 1734 and 1925.
    The seven other bells had to be recast and are now named:-
    Thanksgiving bell Hanna, the baptism bell Philippus, the prayer bell David, the wedding bell Josua, the city bell Jeremia, the proclamation bell Johannes and the peace bell Jesaja.
    On 4th May 2003, 100,000 people came to see the bells arrive in a procession to the Schlossplatz.

    Probably why this Church really stands out, is because of its light colour. Most of Dresdens buildings are dark and dull.

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    FRAUENKIRCHE - INSIDE

    by balhannah Written Dec 3, 2013

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    Inside of Frauenkirche
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    The Frauenkirche (Church of our Lady) is a beautiful Church inside and out.

    This High Baroque Church with a stone dome dates back to the 18th century. It's lovely Dome, the 'Stone bell', was finished in 1738. It consists of a double shell with two casings that make up the inner and outer dome. Finally, the magnificent church was completed in 1743.

    1945, and the war came and destroyed this lovely church, leaving it as pile of rubble for 50 years.
    It was not until the 1990s it was rebuilt. Most of the funds for the reconstruction came from donations. A 4.7m high replica steeple cross was donated by a group of British donors.

    This Church was the busiest Tourist attraction I found in Dresden. I moved inside with a large group of people only to find the Church nearly full of people. Even though your meant to be quiet, it was quite noisy because of the amount of people in there.

    The interior is new. It was different, it was magnificent in my eyes! Inside, is a circular nave that is surrounded by galleries, four stories high! The nave is covered by the inner dome which is brightly painted and depicts the four virtues and the four evangelists. The Altar was originally created between 1733 - 1739, had to be reconstructed in 2000. The Baroque decorations of the altar show the figure of Christ on the mount of olives, above is the beautiful baroque Organ.

    If you wish, you can go to the Dome. A volunteer guide takes the tour. A lift passes first to the level of the third loft, then the path between the two dome shells goes on a ramp to the viewing platform in the lantern. It is a chance to hear the history and about the rebuilding of the Frauenkirche.
    The climb to the observation deck on the dome is possible all year round.
    Opening times:
    March to October: Mon - Sat 10 - 6pm, Sun 12:30-6pm
    November to February: Mon - Sat 10-4pm, Sun 12:30-4pm
    Cost in 2013 10 euros per person

    The Frauenkirche can be visited from Monday to Friday from 10 a.m. - 12 noon and from 1 p.m. - 6 p.m.. Visiting is also possible at the weekends.
    Sometimes the times are different because of marriages, christenings, services and concerts taking place.
    Guided tours are offered and mostly are free - Donations are welcomed.

    A MUST VISIT IN DRESDEN

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    Excavations in Neumarkt

    by Kathrin_E Written Jun 25, 2013

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    Excavations behind Kulturpalast, 2013

    The baroque quarter around Neumarkt is rebuilt step by step. However, before any construction works start, the archeologists take their chance to explore what's hidden underneath. The foundations and cellars of the real baroque houses are brought to light and investigated in a hurry before the shovels and cranes appear. The scenery changes as the works proceed. Currently (June 2013) a block behind Kulturpalast is open and visible through some gaps in the fence.

    For a laugh: Find Dresden on Google Earth, enlarge the Neumarkt area and switch to satellite image, and leave the "labels" on. All the new hotels around Neumarkt are marked. The picture shown underneath is a few years old, though, so you get to see a field of ruins labelled as "Aparthotel xy..."

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    The Frauenkirche

    by EasyMalc Updated May 31, 2013

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    If there’s one building that symbolises Dresden it would have to be the Frauenkirche.
    Reconstructed out of the rubble of the 1945 bombing raids it has come to represent, more than any other building, the resurgence of the city and today stands proud once again in the revamped Neumarkt.
    Although there was a church dedicated to ‘Our Dear Lady’ in the Neumarkt back in the 11th cent it eventually outlived its purpose and a new one was conceived in the 18th cent.
    Commissioned by the council and designed by George Bahr, work was started in 1726 and completed in 1743. Augustus the Strong gave it his financial support but neither he nor George Bahr saw it completed.
    Reminiscent of the domes of St. Peter’s in Rome and Florence Cathedral and topped with a stone bell, the protestant church came to symbolise Dresden.
    The 1945 air raids however, left it in ruins and for quite sometime it was left as it was - and became a different symbol - this time, of war.
    There was a will though to bring it back to life and a plan was put together to make it happen. In 1994 work started on salvaging what could be used and by 2005 the project was completed. 3,634 sandstone blocks were used out of the original 8,390 recovered and are recognizable by their black colouring. €110m in donations were included in the total cost of €180m to re-build.
    The original cross that adorned the top of the stone bell was found amongst the ruins and the one that has replaced it was given by Gt. Britain as a gesture of peace. It was made by the London artist Alan Smith, son of one of the RAF pilots who flew on the Dresden raids. The original is now inside the church.
    The interior of the church has a very light and airy feel to it but as photography isn’t allowed I’m not able to include any interior pictures. The altar is particularly impressive and has been re-constructed from 2,000 pieces of rubble.
    If you’re feeling up for it you can climb the ramp up to the dome for some city views but as I’d just been up to the top of the Hausmannturm I gave it a miss this time
    For once, I felt looking down wasn’t the best prospect. Looking up at this re-built church will give you a sense of wonderment, so I could only imagine what it must feel like if you’re a native of Dresden.

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    Church of Our Lady

    by Raimix Updated Jan 25, 2013

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    Church was built in baroque style in 1726 – 1743. Second World War damaged church and for some time it was standing as a symbol of peace, anti-war.

    Church was fully restored only in 2005. Actually, as I understand, who money for reconstruction was taken by donation of people, so it shows solidarity and sensibility to war devastation.

    It is pity, it was not possible to visit church, it was used for a concert that moment, but when it is not a concert time, it is possible to visit it inside.

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    Frauenkirche-Church of our Lady

    by BruceDunning Updated Dec 10, 2011

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    Close up of the old and new stone work
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    This is a Protestant church that was the Baroque design of George Bahr and it was built between 1726-1743. An original church was on this site from the 11th century and a major monument until torn down in 1727. Its characteristic dome is called the "stone bell" due to its appearance of an inverted bell that is about 313 feet tall. It weighs 12,000 tons and is of sandstone supported by eight columns on the interior. It was shelled by 100 cannon balls in 1760 Seven Years War but little damage was done to the dome and church.
    WWI caused nearly total damage to the structure and the East wanted it left as a memorial to war and damage that it takes. After the reunification, the church undertaking was to rebuild in its authenticity. They made a catalogue and took each stone apart/down that was still standing beginning in 1994, using 8425 of the old stones and also much of the interior decor. It took until 2005 to complete this project, and today you can see the old dark colored stones compared to the new and lighter colored ones.
    Located in Neumarket area that is a plaza of shops and places to eat near Landsstrasse. It seems as though they have taken away a lot of the reverence by selling trinkets and making the church a place to come and gawk at, rather than revere the reason for the church.
    The open times are Monday-Friday 10-1 and 2-6PM. The weekends are not usually open for visitors. An information/ticket center is located across the plaza. You need a ticket to get in and at you option see a film that lasts about 15 minutes and shows 15 minutes before the hour. Entry to that is 2-4 Euro, and the guided tour to the church is 8 Euro and the tower is 8 Euro within that price--STEEP

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  • Maria81's Profile Photo

    Frauenkirche

    by Maria81 Updated Aug 5, 2011

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    Frauenkirche

    Where?

    An der Frauenkirche, in the Old City

    What?

    Dresden's most famous church, Frauenkirche was in ruins for 50 years following the bombing of the city during World War II. Although there was a church on the spot as far back as 11th century, the shape of the current building dates to Saxony's heyday - 1st half of 18th century, with a design by George Bähr.

    The interior features rich baroque decoration, best viewed from the viewing platform at the top of the cupola, from where you can see the galleries surrounding the circular nave. Noteworthy is also a white altar, rebuilt in 2000.

    The church was partially restored with donations from lottery scratchcards, sold in the city in mid-to-late 1990s.

    Keep in mind

    It's not permitted to take photographs inside (erm, I did break that rule...)

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    The Dresdener Frauenkirche (under construction)

    by chancay Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Frauenkirche under construction

    The Dresdener Frauenkirche (under construction)...not this page, but the church....hmm, the page as well. :-)
    that´s why I´ll put more important info about this church later, just for now: have a look at this web pages if you´re more interested:

    http://www.frauenkirche-dresden.org/ (only in german, sorry)

    http://www.cornhusker.net/~bowens/english.html

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Neumarkt platz

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 28, 2011

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    Neumarkt platz
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    The Neumarkt is a central and culturally significant section of the Dresden inner city.
    The Neumarkt is one of the most beautiful squares in Germany. The 95m high dome of the Frauenkirche – the central landmark of the city, which dominates the square.

    After German reunification the decision was made to restore the Neumarkt to its pre-war look.
    The completion of the reconstructed Dresden Frauenkirche in 2005 marked the first step in rebuilding the Neumarkt. Quarter I and the front section of Quarters II, III, IV and V(II) have since been completed.

    You can watch my 6 min 04 sec Video Dresden in August of 2005 out of my Youtube channel.

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    Frauenkirche in 2005

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 14, 2011

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    Dresden - Frauenkirche in september of 2005
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    In three years (and in ten years after my first visit) we went to see how the church looked like at that moment. That was my fourth visit to Dresden.
    We knew that the reconstruction of its exterior was completed in 2004.
    But it was still closed (in September) because the reconstruction of its interior was going on and in October of 2005 after 13 years of rebuilding, the church was reconsecrated.

    Rebuilding the church cost180 million euro. Dresdner Bank financed more than half of the reconstruction costs via a "donor certificates campaign", collecting almost 70 million euro after 1995. Over the years, thousands of watches containing tiny fragments of Church of Our Lady stone were sold, as were specially printed medals.

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    Frauenkirche in 1999

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 14, 2011

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    Frauenkirche in 1999
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    For a long time the church was a reminder of the city’s painful past, its recent transformation. The charred remains of the church were left untouched by East Germany’s communist authorities to serve as a reminder of World War II.

    When I visited Dresden for the second time in 1999 reconstruction was in full strength.

    As far as possible, the church – except for its dome – was rebuilt using original material and plans, with the help of modern technology. The heap of rubble was documented and carried off stone by stone. The approximate original position of each stone could be determined from its position in the heap.
    Every usable piece was measured and catalogued. A computer imaging program that could move the stones three-dimensionally around the screen in various configurations was used to help architects find where the original stones sat and how they fit together.

    It has been reconstructed as a landmark symbol of reconciliation between former warring enemies.

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    Monument to Martin Luther

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 13, 2011

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    Monument to Martin Luther
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    A bronze statue of reformer and theologian Martin Luther, which survived the bombings, has been restored and again stands in front of the church. It is the work of sculptor Adolf von Donndorf from 1885.

    You can watch my 4 min 57 sec HD Video Dresden 2009 out of my Youtube channel.

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    Frauenkirche in 2009

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 13, 2011

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    Frauenkirche in 2009
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    So four years later (and 14 years after the first visit) we came to see the church for the fifth time.

    Reconsecrated 60 years after being destroyed by the Allied bombings the Baroque sandstone Church of our Lady became a must again for any visitor to Dresden like it had been before the WWII.
    Today it is again the most famous part of Dresden’s skyline.

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    Frauenkirche in 2002

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 13, 2011

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    Frauenkirche in 2002
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    Three years later I saw the church for the third time - the building of the church was almost ready.

    Of the millions of stones used in the rebuilding, more than 8,500 original stones were salvaged from the original church and approximately 3,800 reused in the reconstruction.
    As the older stones are covered with a darker patina, due to fire damage and weathering, the difference between old and new stones will be clearly visible for a number of years after reconstruction.

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    Frauenkirche in 1995

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 13, 2011

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    Dresden - Frauenkirche in 1995
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    The Dresden Frauenkirche or Church of Our Lady is a Lutheran church and one of the most beautiful churches in the world.
    Built in the 18th century, the church was destroyed in the firebombing of Dresden during World War II.
    Though reconstruction of the church began in 1992, the impressive ruins of the Frauenkirche still rised, when I saw it for the first time in 1995.
    After the bombing in February of 1945 the ruins of the church were left standing as a reminder of the terrible destruction of the city. In 1966, the remnants were officially declared a "memorial against war", and state-controlled commemorations were held there on the anniversaries of the destruction of Dresden.

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