Fürstenzug (Procession of the dukes), Dresden

26 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Fürstenzug (Procession of the dukes)
    by EasyMalc
  • Fürstenzug (Procession of the dukes)
    by EasyMalc
  • Fürstenzug (Procession of the dukes)
    by EasyMalc
  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE PROCESSION OF PRINCES

    by balhannah Updated Dec 9, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Procession of Princes
    4 more images

    This is another historical sight not to be missed

    The Procession of Princes I was looking at today, was not the original. This one, even though quite old as it was painted between 1870 and 1876 to celebrate the 800 year anniversary of the Wettin Dynasty, is no where near as old as the original, painted almost 300 years earlier with lime wash. The original painting deteriorated badly through exposure to natural elements, so the new painter "Wilhelm Walther" employed the sgraffito technique on a stucco base, which has allowed for a lot of detail to be added. Between 1906 and 1907, close to 25,000 Meissen ceramic tiles were used as replacement for the sgraffito. It was hoped this would stop deterioration.

    This mural is 102 metres long and depicts a parade of rulers of the House of Wettin since 1127.
    There are 35 noblemen - princes, dukes, margraves and kings all are on horseback, alongside are foot men accompanying them, making a grand total of 93 people in the Mural.

    The procession starts with Konrad the Great, who ruled from 1127 to 1156 and ends with George of Saxony 1902 - 1904.
    Lets not forget the artist who portrayed himself as the last person in the procession.

    Its a wonderful detailed Mural - A MUST SEE!

    If your interested, the website has the whole list of who is in the procession.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • EasyMalc's Profile Photo

    Procession of the Dukes

    by EasyMalc Updated Jun 29, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Along the wall of the Langer Gang in Augustrasse is the 102 metre long mural known as the Procession of the Dukes (or Princes).
    There are 93 people depicted on horseback altogether which include almost all of the rulers from the Wettin dynasty. Apart from the rulers of Saxony there are also other well respected representatives of the Saxon art and scientific world including Willhelm Walther.
    Willhelm Walther was the man responsible for the original sgraffito mural that he produced between 1872 and 1876. After weathering took its toll it was replaced by 24,000 Meissen porcelain tiles in 1907.
    It proved to be a good move because the tiles remained virtually undamaged after the 1945 bombing raids.
    I think if I was a Dresden schoolteacher this would be one of the first places I would take the kids to take a look at their history.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Mural-largest outdoor in Europe

    by BruceDunning Updated Dec 8, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Angle view of the mural
    3 more images

    The neat thing to observe is all the small mosaic porcelain tiles that make up this mural that stretches for about 300 feet and 30 feet in height. The mural was constructed in 1589 originally as part of a courtyard of the stables. IN the 17th century the painting deteriorated to such a degree that it was not worth saving. In 1876-79 Wilhelm Walther completed a painted fresco of the procession of kings, but it only lasted until 1901, due to damp elements of the area. Again is was rejuvenated in early 1907, but this time with a new scheme of using mosaic tiles (23,921 of them) to display the rulers and everyday life of Saxons.
    The famous August Strong, ruler of this territory for years is shown, along with about 35 other key rulers, princes, and dukes of the time from 1127 to 1904 with Fredric August III being the last.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Leipzig's Profile Photo

    Fürstenzug (The Procession of Dukes)

    by Leipzig Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Procession of Dukes

    This fresco was made between 1872 – 1876 by W. Walther. In 1907 the porcelain manufacture of Meissen transferred the painting on 24,000 little porcelain tiles to resist weathering.
    With a length of 102 meters and a height of 10 meters it is world’s biggest porcelain mosaic.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Augustusstrasse

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 21, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Augustusstrasse
    4 more images

    Augustusstrasse is one of the most beautiful streets in Dresden.
    The wall on the other side of the Langer Gang, along the Augustusstrasse, is decorated with a porcelain illustration known as the Fürstenzug or Procession of Princes.

    You can watch my 3 min 09 sec HD Video 2009 Dresden Zwinger out of my Youtube channel.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Fürstenzug

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 13, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    F��rstenzug
    4 more images

    The royal palace is decorated outside by painting where all sovereigns of Dresden are represented, irrespective of their contribution to history of city. For example, king Fridrih Bitten is known for that he was bitten by wife for change. He was no more become famous than nothing. August Strong - kurfurst Saxony, king of Poland and, by some estimations, the father of 300 children is immortalized on porcelain. In total all participates in " Procession of kings " is equal 35 - all dukes and kings on horses.

    We feel history from the biggest in the world panel from Meissen porcelain. More than 800-years board of dynasty Wettins continued longer, than any other dynasty. In 1586-1591 it was incorporated a court yard with a building of a stable which long wall left to Elba. This external wall was decorated in 1589 by painting in technics sgraffito (a way of decorative furnish of walls at which figure is scratched in the top layer of plaster and is exposed the bottom layer differing on color). But in XIX century dampness from Elba has completely destroyed a picture. New registration of a wall in length of 102,3 meters was executed by height of 10,46 meters in 1873-1876 also in technics sgraffito. The Dresden artist Wilhelm Walter who received the order in 1865, executed it personally.
    But in 1901 significant damages was found out. Unexpectedly the help came from the Meissen porcelain manufactory, suggested to transfer a picture on porcelain tiles. Specially the new method of manufacturing of a list and stacking of tiles was developed for this project. From April till July 1907 on a wall on a solution 23 921 porcelain tile, made in 1905-1906 was laid out.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Fürstenzug

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Jun 28, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    F��rstenzug - Dresden. Detail
    4 more images

    The Fürstenzug in the Altstadt Augustusstraße is a 102 meters long and 10 meters high display at the North side of the Stallhofes showing the 35 Princes of the Wettin House, that ruled the area since 1127, resulting in the Kingdom of Saksen in 1806.

    Originally the display was painted between 1870 and 1876 by Wilhelm Walter. When the paint deteriorated the display was replaced in 1906 and 1907 with 25,000 ceramic tiles measuring 20.5 x 20.5 cm from the porcelain manufacturer Meissen.

    During the World War II bombardments only 654 tiles were broken. In 1978-1979 the display was restored in its original beauty.

    The Display starts with Konrad the Great and ends with Friedrich August III.

    At the left side this text is displayed: Ein Fürstenstamm dess Heldenlauf reicht bis zu unsern Tagen, in grauer Vorzeit ging er auf mit unsres Volkes sagen.
    At the right side: Du alter Stamm sei stets erneut in edler Fürsten Reihe; wie alle Zeit dein Volk dir weiht die alte Deutsche Treue.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Henk.Irene's Profile Photo

    The Fürstenzug and the long passage

    by Henk.Irene Updated May 30, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The F��rstenzug
    1 more image

    The largest wallpainting of the world, 102,3 m long and 10,46 m high, be make of 23621 Meissenerporcelain tiles (April of 1907). It shows 35 portraits of monarchen from the house Wettin. It gives a documentary of a dominion from about 800 years.

    Nearby is the long passage with 22 Toscaanse pillars.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Ekaterinburg's Profile Photo

    A Right Royal Dude Procession

    by Ekaterinburg Updated Mar 18, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Exciting wall decoration along August Strasse
    3 more images

    The outside wall of the Langer Gang, the long passage which connects the Residenzschloss with the stables, is home to one of Dresden's most famous sights. This is the Furstenzug or Procession of The Dukes and it's the most effective way I've ever come across, to force passers-by to remember who made this city.

    If Vienna is all about Habsburgs, Dresden is all about Wettins and none more so than the most colourful and infamous of them all, Augustus the Strong. This was the same Augustus whose vision of the city resulted in the Zwinger and The Hofkirche to name but a few. So even if you are really not into ruling families and couldn't care less who founded Dresden, this monumental mural will give you a potted history of the Wettin Dynasty, whether you like it or not.

    The mural depicts 35 noblemen altogether, from the 12th century Konrad the Great, to Friedrich August 111, Saxony's last king, who ruled from 1904-1918. It was originally painted by Wilhelm Walter between 1870 and 1876 but eventually, the stucco began to crumble and around 1906-'07 it was replaced by 25,000 Meissen tiles. You can read the statistics about the length, height etc in any guidebook but believe me it is one monument you will not pass by without looking at very closely. The names of all the rulers are printed underneath but I admit that I had to make a guess as to which one was Augustus the Strong. My guess is the flamboyant character in photo 3 but I'm probably wrong. If you find out for sure, please let me know.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • nicolaitan's Profile Photo

    Procession of Dukes -- 700 Years of Royalty

    by nicolaitan Updated Jan 6, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Procession of Dukes is a remarkable mural originally painted by Wilhelm Walther between 1871-76 and in 1907 transferred to more than 24000 Meissen tiles over a length exceeding 100 yards. The occasion was the 800th anniversary of the Wettin dynasty. It is located on the narrow Augustusstrasse which is the best route between the museum-palcace complex and the touristic commercial center of Old Dresden, attached to a back wall of the palace in an area used as a stable. The majesty of this work is somewhat denigrated by the line of tacky souvenir kiosks along the opposite wall - shut them out and concentrate on the art work - black,white, and grey drawings which are almost like pencil drawings set against a gold and grey background.

    At the beginning, a band and herald(image 1) lead images of each Wettin duke, margrave, prince, and king dressed in period specific clothing and with appropriate armor and weaponry. The first of the 35 royals is Konrad The Great (1127-56) with all the others in chronologic order ( the names and dates are inscribed at the base ). The most famous is August the Strong (1694) and the last is King George (1902-4). Only Friedrich August III (1904-18) is not included. At the end are a grouping of citizens with artists, tradesmen, scientists, and teachers with a total of 94 on the mural as well as horses for the royalty and a few dogs. And at the extreme far right is an image of Walther himself.
    It was pointed out to us that the horse for August the Strong is about to trample a flower, meant to recall his conversion to the Catholic faith in order to become King of Poland - the horse is stamping on the flower of Protestant reform.
    Of interest, the tiles suffered little damage in the WWII carpet bombing of Dresden. Less than 200 needed replacement and the work was refurbished in the late 1970's to its current appearance.

    Was this review helpful?

  • el_ruso's Profile Photo

    Procession of Kings

    by el_ruso Written Nov 30, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Augustus Strasse has an amazing mosaic on its side of the Wettin dynasty that continuously ruled over Saxony, beginning with the very first one. First they were markgrafs, then kurfursts, then kings. The display is finished with its artist displayed in the very end.

    Was this review helpful?

  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Fürstenzug

    by lina112 Written Oct 25, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mural painted on tiles of Meissen porcelain. Is 101 metres long. Depicts successive generations of Wettin rulers as a mounted procession.

    Mural pintado en baldosas de porcelana y mide 101 metros de largo y describe las representaciones ecuestres de los soberanos y señores sajones.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Trains

    Was this review helpful?

  • himalia11's Profile Photo

    Fürstenzug

    by himalia11 Written Aug 2, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    F��rstenzug

    This shows the history of the Saxon dynasty with all the sovereigns. It was created in the 19th century and is an interesting piece of art. It first had been black and white, done with a technique called Sgrafitto which is a kind of engraving in the plaster. Then in 1906, it was put on Meissen porcelain because of the bad actual state. It's about 102 m long and 10,51 high, and has 25000 tiles – really impressive.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Guenter66's Profile Photo

    Heroic leaders

    by Guenter66 Written Jul 4, 2005

    This is only a detail of a huge wall-painting which survived the bombing of last war. It was performed more than a century ago on a special ceramic material. This was developed by the famous Meissen-Porzellan manufacture-plant. The picture is really wonderful! The text on the left side tells us that the roots of the family reaches back to "grey pre-times".

    Was this review helpful?

  • hundwalder's Profile Photo

    Furstenzug. A parade of upper crust nobility.

    by hundwalder Updated Jun 11, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Furstenzug royal mural

    Imagine an incredibly high quality mural more than a football field long. This masterpiece was completed a little more than 100 years ago, and shows all of the significant nobility of Saxon history to that point. A prize awaits the first person to correctly identify each one. Don't worry if you can't remember them. The name of each hero is inscribed below his / her likeness. The long corrider like building serving as the canvas was built in the 16 th. century solely to protect nobility from being pelted with rotten fruit as they sashayed from one royal building to another. Must have been nice for them to have been so much better than everyone else.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Dresden

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

120 travelers online now

Comments

View all Dresden hotels