Hofkirche, Dresden

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  • Cathedral, interior by night toward the organ
    Cathedral, interior by night toward the...
    by german_eagle
  • Cathedral, pulpit detail
    Cathedral, pulpit detail
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  • Kathedrale St. Trinitatis - Dresden
    Kathedrale St. Trinitatis - Dresden
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    INSIDE THE HOFKIRCHE # 2

    by balhannah Updated Dec 1, 2013

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    There is still more to offer, like the amazing baroque Pulpit! ....Wow! .....This was something, overdone in my opinion, but a great piece of work done by Permoser. Amazingly, the locals manage to hide it during the war so were are very lucky to see it today.

    Inside is a Memorial Chapel and Martyr Altars.
    On the walls of the Memorial Chapel are 52 names of priests of the diocese who were persecuted and imprisoned in the period of Nazi dictatorship between 1933 and 1945. The Martyr Altars were different and invoked a feeling of sadness, especially as Alois Andritzki, a former priest at the Hofkirche was arrested in 1941 for speaking out against the NAZI regime. He was imprisoned at Dachau with other priests and was murdered by lethal injection on February 3, 1943. He was beatified in 2011

    Dresden lost approx. 35,000 people during WWII. In memory of this sad occasion, a Dresden sculptor created a impressive memorial for all those who were lost for-ever. What more could bring home the sad reality, than a mother holding her dead son in her lap. In her hands she holds the ruins of war, which is a crown of thorns. Only love can break the vicious circle of destruction.

    The block altar shows skulls and flames to remind those of the burning of Dresden.

    A guided tour is included to the four burial vaults where the remains of kings and princes of Saxony and an Urn containing the heart of Augustus the Strong are buried. His body is buried in Krakow.

    OPEN... May 1 to Oct 31: 9am-5pm; Sun: 12pm-4pm; Fri: 1pm-5pm; Sat: 10:30am-4pm
    Nov 1 to Apr 30: 9am-5pm; Sun: 12pm-4pm; Fri: 1pm-5pm; Sat: 10:30am-5pm

    Entrance fee: FREE
    Guides: Guided tour included with admission.

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    INSIDE THE HOFKIRCHE # 3

    by balhannah Written Dec 1, 2013

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    The Hofkirche has a beautiful Main Organ, one you can look at and hear being played. It is the last of the original three works built by master organ builder, "Gottfried Silbermann." The organ was begun in 1750, unfortunately, Silbermann died in 1753 before its completion, so his colleague completed it. In 1755, this 3000 pipe organ was ready to be played!

    THE ORGAN MUSIC CAN BE HEARD
    At noon Wednesday.
    Saturday, 11:30 - 12:00 clock (except on or before major holidays)

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    INSIDE THE HOFKIRCHE # 1

    by balhannah Updated Dec 1, 2013

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    Hofkirche High Altar
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    As I could see this was a massive Cathedral, it was no surprise to find the inside high, light and airy!
    Not many people were inside, just a smallish tourist group, giving me the chance to feel the peacefulness and to sit quietly take in the surroundings.
    The baroque interior is not full of frescoes or stucco work, it does have a lot of beautiful paintings and sculptures and an amazing Pulpit!
    The inside is painted white and grey, and has three corner chapels.

    I made my way to the high altar that's made of local marble, to view the impressive set of six silver candlesticks from 1752 and the 4.2 metre silver cross made in 1756. Above, is a lovely painting showing the returning to Heavenly Father Christ done by court painter, Anton Raphael Mengs This dates to 1761.

    To the left and right of the High Altar are the Joseph & Mary Altars and the Sacrament & Cross Chapels.

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    HOFKIRCHE - CHURCH OF THE COURT

    by balhannah Written Dec 1, 2013

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    Hofkirche

    This Baroque church is claimed to be one of the most beautiful buildings in Dresden.
    Mmm, Hard to judge as Dresden has many beautiful buildings!

    It all began in 1697, when Augustus the Strong converted to catholicism so he could become King of Poland. He used his own Royal Chapel for a while, then decided a Catholic Church was to be built to counterbalance the protestant church.
    So, between 1738 and 1751 in high Baroque style, the Catholic Church was built. This large Church is topped with a copper onion dome and has balustrades from which 78 statues, each 3 metres high look out over the city. These are of Apostles, saints and church dignitaries.

    This was another building which was bombed during the war. It was only as recent as 1979, that reconstruction began. It was during this time, the bishop's seat of Meissen was moved to Dresden, designating the city's catholic church as a Cathedral. It is also the largest Church in Saxony.
    The crypt of the cathedral, contains 49 sarcophagi of the Wettin princes and kings as well as their relatives. It is also the resting place of the heart of Augustus the Strong.

    OPEN
    Mon, Tues 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
    Wed, Thu 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    FriDAY 1pm - 5 p.m.
    Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.|
    Sunday 12noon - 4 p.m.

    Wed, Sat 11.30 a.m. - 12 a.m. Lunchtime (organ) recital

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    The Hofkirche

    by EasyMalc Updated May 14, 2013

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    Writing a tip about somewhere that I haven’t gone into is something I try not to do but there are always going to be exceptions to the rule and The Hofkirche is one of them.
    It’s a Dresden landmark that is impossible to miss, not only because it’s slap bang in the centre of the Altstadt, but it’s also the largest church in Saxony. I’ve seen it from a distance, walked all the way around it, and even looked down on it - but not in it.
    The Hofkirche, now known as the Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity, is a Catholic oasis in Protestant Dresden and the reason for this is down to Dresden’s famous Elector, Augustus the Strong.
    When he changed his religion to Catholic in 1697 in order to become King of Poland he had a vision to build a church worthy of his new found faith, and even though it was heavily bombed in 1945, it still stands tall over the city.
    Built by Italian craftsmen the thing that struck me was the number of statues there are, 59 of which are on the balustrades.
    Even though I haven’t been inside the church I do know that in the crypt are 47 members of the Wettin dynasty who have ruled Saxony for 800 years and even though Dresden’s famous son, Augustus the Strong was buried in Poland’s Krakow Cathedral his heart was brought here and still lies in a simple box.
    If I ever come back to Dresden again I’ll make sure I come and check it out. Now that I know a bit more I feel that I would need to do that to fully understand this wonderful city.

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    Cathedral

    by Raimix Written Jan 3, 2013

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    Cathedral was built in 1739 – 1755 and known as the youngest baroque building in Dresden. It is monumental, very in detail architecture, also it houses scripts with 49 sarcophagus (Wettin princes), also the hearth of Augustus the Strong. Saxony has no other bigger church than Cathedral.

    Is is one of the most beautiful buildings in Dresden, also one church, that is possible to see inside (some of them are used for other purposes).

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    Cathedral

    by german_eagle Updated Feb 24, 2012

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    Cathedral, seen from the right bank of the Elbe
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    The cathedral called "Katholische Hofkirche" is the largest church in Saxony. It was built 1738 - 1755 by Gaetano Chiaveri as the latest masterpiece of Roman Baroque in Europe. The tall, graceful tower is one of Dresden's landmarks.

    As you may know Saxony is the birthplace of Reformation. However, when Elector Duke Augustus the Strong wanted to become King of Poland he had to convert to Catholizism. At first a small chapel in the Royal Comedy Theatre was sufficient for catholic services, but when his son took over (he was married to *very* catholic Maria Josepha, daughter of the Habsburg Emperor!) he gave order to build an impressive Catholic church.

    Inside you must see Permoser's Baroque pulpit (relocated from the previous chapel), the fantastic altar painting by Raphael Anton Mengs (Ascension, 1752 - 65) and the organ by Gottfried Silbermann - his latest work. Well worth to see are also the chapels at the four corners with stucco marble and beautiful paintings (Stefano Torelli, Louis de Silvestre, Franz Karl Palko). The sacrament's chapel was restored originally after the destruction in WWII, the others more basic. Very interesting and moving is the memorial chapel (former John Nepomuk chapel). The altar and the pieta were made of Meissen porcelain by Friedrich Press in 1973. High on the side walls you can read the words of the last prayer prior to the fateful night of 13 February 1945 (the bombing). Almost prophetic.

    Every Wednesday and Saturday free organ concert 11.30 - 12.00 am.

    Open:
    Mon/Tue 9 -17 h
    Wed/Thu 9 - 17 h
    Fri 13-17 h
    Sat 10 - 17 h
    Sun 12 - 16 h

    Don't miss a guided tour of the burial vault with tombs of the Saxon Kings.

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    Hofkirche-Church of Holy Trinity

    by BruceDunning Updated Dec 10, 2011

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    Panorama of the church
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    It is the Catholic church that Augustus the Strong left his heart; literally it is in the church crypt. He converted to Catholicism in order to obtain the Polish King crown title. At the time, the region was mostly Protestant, but the ruler wanted more power and larger region. He attended service in the royal chapel and later his son decided to build the Catholic church to rival Fraunenkirche being Protestant.
    Italian architect Gaetano Chiaveri designed the large church in combination of Roman and Baroque architecture. and it was built between 1738-1751. It was the largest church in Saxony. The roof height is 272 feet at the peak. The 78 statues on ringing the top walls are each 10 feet tall, and they represent holy figures and historical people.It was destroyed in WWI and did not get completed to original state until 2006 after 26 years of work. In 1980 the church was christened Sanctissimae Trinitatis-Holy Trinity that elevated it to status of Bishop residence

    It is open Monday-Thursday 9-5PM, Friday 1-5PM. Saturday 10:30-4PM, and Sunday 12-4PM. Entry is free

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    Hofkirche

    by Maria81 Updated Aug 5, 2011

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    Where?

    In the Old City, on Theaterplatz, right by the Zwinger Palace and the Opera

    What?

    Hofkirche was the main Catholic church of the Saxon royal court, and the primary church of Dresden in Saxony's heyday. Built in mid-18th century by Gaetano Chiaveri in the Baroque style, The church became a cathedral in the second half of 20th century. Richly decorated both inside and outside, Hofkirche still has some of the finest statues in Dresden, mostly sculpted by Lorenzo Mattielli. Another striking feature is the 80m+ belfry, crowned with a copper onion dome.

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    Hofkirche inside

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 13, 2011

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    Hofkirche inside
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    The exterior of the church is striking, with its 85.5m high tower and its 78 statues in niches and on the balustrades.
    Notable features of the interior are the processional ambulatories, Balthasar Permoser's magnificently carved pulpit (1722), the altarpiece of the Ascension (by Mengs, 1750-51) and the Silbermann organ (1750-53), Silbermann's last and finest work.
    In four burial vaults are the remains of kings and princes of Saxony. An urn contains the heart of Augustus the Strong. His body was buried in Krakow.

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    Hofkirche

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 13, 2011

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    Hofkirche in 2005
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    The Katholische Hofkirche (The Catholic Church of the Royal Court of Saxony) is a Roman Catholic Cathedral, located in the 'Altstadt' in the heart of Dresden.
    The Church with an openwork tower in height of 83 meters is located on the western side of the Royal Palace square . There are 78 statues, height of each of which more than 3 meters, on a roof of church.
    The church was erected under the order of August Strong, accepted a Catholicism to become king of Poland. It was built by architect Gaetano Chiaveri from 1738 to 1751. Preparation for construction of a Catholic cathedral in style of a late baroque was conducted in the deepest secret since over Dresden was dominated at this time with Protestant religion.
    The church was badly damaged during World War II and was restored during the mid-1980s.

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    Kathedrale St. Trinitatis or Hofkirche

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Jun 28, 2010

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    Kathedrale St. Trinitatis - Dresden
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    In 1980 the former Hofkirche was renamed into the Kathedrale St. Trinitatis.

    The original church construction started in 1739 and lasted till 1755 during the time August III of Poland was in power. The architect was Gaetano Chiaveri who came up with a Baroque design.

    The church was heavely damaged by bombardments in Worl War II, but was restored completely in 1965.

    In the graves in the basement 49 Rulers are buried and also the heart of "August des Starken", who is buried at Krakow.

    On the outer balustrade 78 statutues of Saints are erected. On the 85.5 meters high tower are symbolic statues for Faith, Hope, Love and Justice.

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    The Cathedral or Hofchurch

    by Henk.Irene Updated Jun 9, 2010

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    The Cathedral (1754), but with
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    The Cathedral - or Hofchurch - is an outstanding barokmonument on the Slotsquare and Theatresquare. After the Zwinger and Frauenkirche is the Cathedral the thirt barokmonument of Dresden. The Cathedral is 86 m high with 78 holyfigures, have a groundbase of 4800 m² and is the bigest church of Saksen.

    See also an unknow Dutch choir to sing in the Cathedral.

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    St. Trinitatis - a Cathedral for Secret Converters

    by Kakapo2 Updated Sep 17, 2008

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    The cathedral on the left, castle on the right.

    The former Catholic Church on the castle grounds (Hofkirche) became the cathedral of the diocese Dresden/Meißen in 1980. It is Saxony’s biggest church. And it is beautiful, built of limestone, with 78 massive three metre high statues of saints surrounding the balustrades. They look much smaller than they are in reality – as is the whole church which was BTW Dresden’s last big Baroque building. It looks very light and airy.

    The story of this church is also very interesting. It had to be built because August the Strong wanted to become King of Poland. Unfortunately he was protestant and absolutely needed to become Catholic to achieve this goal. So he converted to Catholicism in the protestant city of Dresden, and Dresden’s taxpayers later had to pay for the construction of the immensely expensive cathedral. Not only the Dresdners were upset, but also August’s wife and his son who later became Elector Friedrich August II and King August III of Poland. When he converted to catholicism in 1712 it was kept secret for a while.

    It was him who requested the church to be built in 1733, and he hired the Italian architect Gaetano Chiaveri. He had known him in Warsaw – and was happy to hire him because he did not find any willing Protestants for the job in Dresden.

    A lot of Italian craftsmen were brought into Dresden. They lived in small houses nearby. They are now known as Italienisches Dörfchen (Italian Village) on Theaterplatz. Now a place for having a coffee.

    Works started in 1739. But soon problems started, and after arguments (because he did not get much support) an angry Chiaveri left in 1749. After that some Saxon master-builders were found who finished the job, and the church was consecrated in 1751.

    The Silbermann organ and some paintings survived the 1945 bombings as they had been taken out of the church and put into storage a year earlier.

    Reconstruction took from 1945 until 1987.

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    He left his heart in the Hofkirche

    by richiecdisc Updated Jan 26, 2008

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    Hofkirche, even more impressive at night
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    Though rebuilt sooner than the Frauenkirche the original Hofkirche was a built not only after the impressive “stone bell” but in response to it. With August the Strong a converted Catholic due to his coronation as the Polish King, he wanted a place of worship equal to the famous Protestant Frauenkirche so he employed Italian architect Gaetano Chiaveri and began his plan in secret to erect the 83 meter oval structure. Though the angular belfry is its hallmark feature another interesting aspect are the seventy-eight 3 meter statues of biblical figures that look out over the city from the remaining oval roof. It was originally built between 1738 and 1751 but as with most of Dresden’s old city center was completely destroyed in 1945’s bombing. The rebuilt structure was begun in 1979 and features an amazing pulpit in the Rocco style by Permoser and a restoration of the last organ built by famed Gottfried Silbermann. Though his body is buried in Krakow, Poland August the Strong showed his allegiance to the city by having is heart laid to rest here.

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