Fun things to do in Dresden

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Dresden

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    CONGRESS CENTRE & ERLWEINSPEICHER

    by balhannah Updated Dec 8, 2013

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    Looking across the River Elbe from the Neustadt side of the River, I could see this very modern building, then an older building, plus one I knew, this was the former Yendize Cigarette factory.

    The modern building was the congress centre, claimed to be one of Europe’s most modern congress centres. Its design of gentle curves and flowing glass, relates to the River Elbe. Views from here are said to be breathtaking

    The other building was the ‘Erlweinspeicher,' a former municipal warehouse built in 1914 for storing tobacco, wool, spice and cloth. That's been restored and made into the Maritim hotel.

    Maritim Hotel & Congress Centre Dresden Congress Centre
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    POLICE HEAD QUARTERS

    by balhannah Updated Dec 3, 2013

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    When I saw this Castle like building in Dresden, I had no idea what it was. Since coming home, I've found it to be the Police Headquarters of Dresden, something I never dreamt it would be.

    The building dates back to 1895 and is recognized as a historic building. The building has a combination of Renaissance and Baroque styles . The two main round towers at the corners also contain a parapet and give the building a fortress character. The building has four wings and three courtyards.
    I believe the Police Museum is here.

    Police Headquarters Police Headquarters
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    AUGUSTUS THE STRONG & CHRISTIAN I

    by balhannah Written Dec 3, 2013

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    I noticed the gold medallion on the wall and wondered what the history was.

    The image is of Saxon King "Augustus II" or "August the Strong"
    Dresden 1670 - Warszawa 1733
    King of Poland (1697-1733) and Elector of Saxony (1694-1733)

    In the niche is
    Christian I, Elector of Saxony
    Dresden 1560 -1591
    Elector of Saxony from 1586

    Augustus the Strong Christian 1 Christian 1 & Augustus the Strong
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    TASCHENBERGPALAIS

    by balhannah Updated Dec 3, 2013

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    The TaschenbergPalais, is now an upmarket Hotel where you can stay in luxurious surroundings.

    The Palace has an interesting story to tell.............

    The elector of Saxony [Augustus the Strong] was a married man with a mistress, so he filed for divorce. Once this came through, his mistress, "Countess Cosel" received Taschenbergpalais as a gift. She was the king's mistress for 9 years and was the mother of his three children.
    He adored her, calling her a most beautiful and brilliant mistress!

    This was not to last.....
    At 36 years old, she was banished from the Dresden court. She spent 49 years in imprisonment.
    For 250 years, the palace was the pride of Dresden, until the bombing of Dresden in WWII destroyed most of it, at least the massive marble staircase survived.

    Since then, a real estate developer spent $175 million on transforming the ruin into Dresden's finest hotel. The west and north sides overlook the Zwinger or the Opera.

    Taschenberg Palais
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    NEUSTADT - NEW MARKET

    by balhannah Written Dec 3, 2013

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    If you have found the beautiful Frauenkirche, then you have found the Neumarkt! The Church is the most visited site in Dresden, so there usually is plenty of people in this square.

    The area which has been here since 1548, was badly damaged in the 7 years war in the 18th century, and then was nearly wiped out in the bombing raids of WWII. Now it has been restored and looks like it once did, surrounded by opulent baroque style buildings.
    just as they once were.
    There are plenty of shops including boutiques antiques and many Cafes and Restaurants with outdoor seating under Umbrellas.

    Neumarkt
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    WALK THE OLD TOWN OF DRESDEN

    by balhannah Updated Dec 3, 2013

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    Yes, I know, I've suggested walking around Dresden. It is quite easy, all flat going, and in quite a compact area.
    The are plenty of walking tours to choose from, these cost approx. 12 eu per person for 1.5 - 2 hours walking around the old town.

    I walked on my own and really enjoyed it. Dresden has lots of historic buildings, lots of history, beautiful parks, sculptures and fountains. I found many lovely, interesting old doors and door knockers and I adored all the lamp-posts. I liked doing it my way, then I could take all the time I wanted to see what I liked!

    Dresden Dresden Dresden Dresden
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    PALACE OF CULTURE

    by balhannah Updated Dec 3, 2013

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    Also facing the Altmarkt is a building I really didn't like much as it looked so out of place! This was the Palace of Culture, a building from 1969 built in East German architecture.
    This large building was used in recent times as a concert hall and housed Dresden's Philharmonic Orchestra.
    On the outside of the building is a large mural "The way the red flag," and the five bronze entrance doors with reliefs showing Dresden's development from a fishing village into a major city. The reliefs being telling the story of Dresden from 1206 to liberation from fascism in 1945, the cleanup and a new beginning.

    Palace of Culture
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    MONUMENT OF MARTIN LUTHER

    by balhannah Written Dec 2, 2013

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    Martin Luther stands on a stone pedestal beside Frauenkirche church.
    He is standing in a cloak with the Bible in his hands, after all, it was he who had it translated into German.

    He was a German priest, professor of theology and iconic figure of the Protestant Reformation.
    He taught that salvation is not earned by good deeds, that you had to be a believer and have faith in Jesus Christ as redeemer from sin. His theology challenged the authority of the Pope.
    Pope Leo X in 1520 and the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V at the Diet of Worms in 1521, both asked him to retract all of his writings. He didn't, resulting in his excommunication by the Pope and condemnation as an outlaw by the Emperor.

    Martin Luther Martin Luther
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    STATUE OF KING FREIDRICH AUGUSTUS I

    by balhannah Written Dec 2, 2013

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    Freidrich Augustus was the first King of Saxony. This is not Friedrich August the Strong, he is another person.
    It was in 1806 when he became King, at a time when some major events took place. It was during this time Saxony surrendered to Prussia and was in huge debt, the interest payments amounted annually to almost one-third of government revenue.
    Now there is a Monument of the King, sitting on a chair in his Coronation Robe in front of the House of Estates. Figures on the corners of the Monument represent the Regent virtues of justice, piety, clemency and wisdom. The consecration anthem was composed by Richard Wagner on the occasion of the first inauguration in 1843.

    King Friedrich Augustus I
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    STATUE OF KING FRIEDRICH AUGUST II

    by balhannah Written Dec 2, 2013

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    Another King, another statue, Dresden has plenty of them.

    King Friedrich August II was the 3rd King of Saxony. He was born in 1797 and died in 1854. It was in 1866, that a monument of the King was erected in Neumarkt. Surprisingly, it escaped major harm when Dresden was bombed. In 2006, King Frederick II was restored and now can be seen standing on a high pedestal, with the four allegorical figures of the ruling virtues justice, wisdom, strength and devotion sitting around the base.

    King Friedrich August II
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    THEATREPLATZ - KING JOHN STATUE

    by balhannah Updated Dec 2, 2013

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    As we exited the Zwinger through one of the archways, we entered the Theatreplatz. Right before our eyes was the large equestrian statue of Saxon King John, [Konig Johann I. von Sachsen] created by Johannes Schilling in 1889. King John was born in Dresden, becoming King of Saxony after the death of his brother Frederick Augustus II on 9 August 1854. He reigned until 1873, when he died at age 71 years.

    The statue stands on a block which has bronze reliefs depicting agriculture, trade and transport. It was pretty dirty and hard to see, so I was pleased to read, the statue was cleaned in 2013 and is looking splendid once again! Now, the reliefs should be easily seen, they are worth stopping and having a look at.

    The Saxon agriculture is depicted with the female allegory of fertility (with cornucopia and bull) vineyards, sheep, fruit trees and grain fields, whilst the opposite side depicts industry and commerce, so locomotive "Saxonia" is included and a Paddle steamer.
    Lower down on the base is a relief of military, arts and sciences.

    King John King John King John King John
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    HOUSE OF THE ESTATES

    by balhannah Updated Dec 2, 2013

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    Facing Palace Square is another monumental building originally known as "The House of Estates." This building has seen many uses over the years, the first was as the Saxony Houses of Parliament.
    Standing looking at the building from Palace Square, you can see a balustrade where four allegorical figures - truth, legality, justice, fortitude . Each of these sculptures were created by a different person, and each of them represent something different.
    The four of them have these meanings..
    #1 the (naked) truth makes us look in the mirror
    #2 the lady of the law holds a legislative panel in hand
    #3 the justice shows her sword
    #4 the fortitude is symbolized by a small sphinx figure whose Durability is known.

    These are the virtues parliament should contain!

    As I wandered around, I found sculptures representing agriculture and fertility, two cherubs with a basket overflowing with fruits, war god Mars and Neptune amongst many others.
    The building has a tower which is crowned by a gilded figure of Saxonia.
    The Monument of King Frederick Augustus I stands in front of the building in Palace Square.

    Do check out the website has it has lots of good close up photos of the many sculptures.

    OPEN Monday to Friday from 7-5pm
    PUBLIC TRANSPORT
    Stop: Theatre Square Tram: 4, 8, 9
    Stop: Old Market Square Tram: 1, 2, 4

    The House of Estates
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    THE JOHANNEUM

    by balhannah Written Dec 2, 2013

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    The Johanneum was built in the 16th century to be used as the Royal Mews. These days, it isn't Horse & Carriages you find here, but vehicles, as it's now the Verkehrsmuseum,- the Transport Museum.

    The building, built in Renaissance style was another building which ended in ruins in WWII, and was rebuilt in 1950.
    The Museum has a collection of old trams, trains, bicycles, planes, cars and model ships, nothing to do with space travel though

    OPEN.Tuesday - Sunday 10 - 5PM
    Adults: € 4.5
    Reduced: € 2.50
    Children (under 5 years): free.
    Dresden-Card Holders: € 3.50

    Transport Museum
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    SUMMER PALACE - PERMOSER SCULPTURE EXHIBITION

    by balhannah Updated Nov 29, 2013

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    As our walk through the Great Garden continued, we came across more lawned areas, larger & wider pathways/roadways, gardens planted with flowers, ponds and a Palace!

    A Palace! We couldn't miss that, so we walked along the main entrance way towards the Palace we could see in the distance. This was the summer Palace, built in the gardens between 1678 - 1683 in Baroque style. It was built for the Court to enjoy their "summer pleasures," a Palace for important wedding's to be held, a Palace not for living in.

    Between the years 1730 to 1747, the Palace housed "August the Strongs" extensive collection of antiques. It was the first large collection of antiquities in Germany.

    I did notice that it still was a Museum, once again, we were too early for the opening hours. I peered in the windows and could see Mannequins dressed in period clothing and quite a few statues/sculptures. This is the Lapidarium which can be visited on guided tours
    On display are Saxon garden sculptures, including 50 original sculptures, including works by Balthasar Permoser, Benjamin Thomae, Johann Christian Kirchner and Gottfried Knöffler. These sculptures are from the end of the 17th century to middle of 18th century. Most are from the Dresden Zwinger, while others are from the Schlosspark Seerhausen and other parks attached to great houses, and from the Elias cemetery in Dresden.

    ADMISSION IS BY GUIDED TOUR
    ADULTS 4 Euro, reduced 2 Euro, children to the age of 5 FREE

    Public guided tours of the Sculpture Collection and the Palace garden
    April to October, all Sundays and holidays as well as Wednesdays 2:30 pm

    Tram Nos. 1 / 2 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 13, Bus Nos. 61 / 63 / 75 / 85, S-Bahn to “HP Strehlen

    Summer Palace Summer Palace Summer Palace Summer Palace
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    SCULPTURES IN THE PARK

    by balhannah Updated Nov 29, 2013

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    It was 1678, when Elector John George III, began buiding the the park, modeling it after French Parks. Once, this Park was reserved exclusively for the nobility, now it's for the general public to enjoy. Quite a bit of the garden has been planted in English style.

    Once we emerged from the woodland, we noticed the wide long avenues. It was along these the Horse & Carriages would have been carrying important guests to the Palace located in the centre of the garden where the avenues meet. It was easy for me to think back to that time, and just how beautiful the ladies must have looked!
    There used to be over 150 vases and sculptures lining the pathways, now, only 22 remain.
    The Park has several open air stages and a Puppet Theatre, Botanical gardens and Zoo. Evidently Fireworks are held quite often in the park.

    DIRECTIONS - RAIL
    Main train station by tram lines 9, 10 or 11
    STOPS: the Strasbourg court, Comeniusplatz, Large garden (Hygiene Museum), Lennéplatz, Querallee and Tiergartenstraße.

    Urns in Great Park Urns in Great Park Map of the Great Park Sculptures in Great Park
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