Royal Palace, Dresden

4.5 out of 5 stars 46 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Sgrafitto facade
    Sgrafitto facade
    by Kathrin_E
  • The horsepond
    The horsepond
    by Kathrin_E
  • Royal Palace
    by Kathrin_E
  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE ROYAL PALACE

    by balhannah Updated Dec 3, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Royal Palace
    1 more image

    The Royal Palace is across the road from the Zwinger.

    Its history goes back to the 13th century when a fort was built here, then in the 15th century, the Hausmann Tower was built. In 1530, George the Bearded - Duke of Saxony, commissioned the construction of the Georgenbau, the original city Gate and exit to the Elbe bridge. In 1701, fire destroyed a large part of the Palace and the Georgenbau which was soon rebuilt in Baroque style by Augustus the Strong.
    The Royal Palace was also destroyed during WWII in 1945. It sat for 40 years in ruins before rebuilding the whole Palace was started in 1985 and completed in 2006, just in time for the city's 800 year anniversary. The Georgenbau was rebuilt again, and finally completed in 1969.

    Now the Royal Palace is home to many fabulous Museums which are a MUST SEE when in Dresden.
    Museums are closed on TUESDAYS, something to remember if you come from a country like I do, where Museums are closed on Mondays!

    Parts are still under restoration, this was in 2013.

    Open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
    Admission charge

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE ROYAL PALACE FREE PART

    by balhannah Written Dec 3, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Royal Palace small courtyard
    2 more images

    The Royal Palace covers a lot of ground, unfortunately, there isn't much that you can see for free. There is a Restaurant and Museum shop on the ground floor and the small courtyard which is covered by a shallow glass dome. It is here people meet or shelter from the rain.
    Most of the Palace is made of Museums that are excellent ones, but if your not a Museum person, this is all you will see of the Palace.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ROYAL PALACE BRIDGES

    by balhannah Updated Dec 2, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Royal Palace bridge #1
    4 more images

    I have never been to Venice and seen the Bridge of Sighs, have only seen photos. When I came across a couple of historic walkways, they reminded me of this Bridge and other Italian Bridges. Both could have been designed by an Italian architect as there were many famous ones working in Dresden at the time.

    #1
    The first I came across was in Taschenberg Street. Here the bridge led from the Royal Palace, across the street to Taschenberg Palace. King August the Strong has Taschenberg palace built in 1709 for his mistress Countess Anna Constanze von Hoym. Unfortunately, the Countess fell into disgrace and was banned from the Palace.
    Perhaps it was just a private walkway for them?

    #2
    The second one connects the Royal Palace and the Hofkirche and was also used by the Royals

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    LANGER GANG = LONG CORRIDOR

    by balhannah Updated Dec 2, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Langer Gang

    Two sights on the one wall, that is the Langer Gang on one side and Procession of Princes on the other side.

    Now it was time for me to have a look at this long arcaded building which connects the Johanneum with the Georgenbau in the Royal Palace. It was constructed in the 16th century as part of the palace's Stallhof (stables courtyard) to house the horses. I loved this elegant building that was painted white and decorated with lovely sgraffito, it had Tuscan columns, each with a deer head, and the Saxon coats-of-arms.
    The courtyard in front of the building was used to hold jousting tournaments and parades.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE GREEN VAULT & NEW GREEN VAULT

    by balhannah Updated Dec 1, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    One of the richest and largest treasure chambers in Europe! Another wonderful Museum for me!

    Why is it named the "GREEN VAULT?"
    Easy! It is named after the formerly malachite green painted column bases and capitals of the initial rooms.

    There are two Green Vaults, so be warned, leave enough time to see both, it is worth it!
    Once again, we have Augustus the Strong to thank for this wonderful collection of treasures. He commanded his private chambers to be turned into splendid rooms in which to display his collection.

    So, when you come, not only look at the displays, but also look at the beautiful rooms.
    What you can expect to see is collections of valuables, including bronze statues and works of art in silver, gold, amber and ivory, enamel works, carved art pieces and small statues, pieces made from real ivory and the silver table service of Augustus the Strong.

    You will see this over 9 rooms, each organized by material. The first room shows off amber, next is the Ivory Room, which also displays statuettes, vessels and goblets, next the White Silver Room and so on.....
    The Hall of Treasures, the largest and completely mirrored room, contains vessels made of colored gems and amber, mussels and ostrich eggs. Also on display is a collection of artworks made from rock crystal.
    The Coats of Arms Room, has copper and gilded coats of arms of the Saxon provinces and the Polish state coat of arms.
    TheJewel Chamber has the crown jewels of the Saxon-Polish royalty and rings, chains, medallions and gems, plus the statue "Moor with Emerald Cluster" The statue was created because Augustus the Strong wanted to exhibit a precious emerald cluster, studded with 16 dark green emeralds, in his new Schatzkammer museum. This "miracle of nature", came from a Colombian mine,and was given to him as a gift in 1581. The "moor" is actually a South American Indian, who presents the Colombian emerald cluster on a tray of tortoiseshell.
    On display is the "Dresden White" or "Saxon White" a 49.71 carat diamond and a 48-carat sapphire, a present from czar Peter I of Russia.
    How many of you have seen anything like the "Court of the Great Mogul Aurangzeb", which incorporates 4,909 diamonds, 160 rubies, 164 emeralds, one sapphire, 16 pearls and two cameos, or something similar - I haven't, so I found this an amazing exhibit!

    I could go on, there is so much to see! DO VISIT, IT IS ANOTHER MUST SEE IN DRESDEN.

    NO PHOTOS ALLOWED - Once again I had to buy postcards

    OPEN Daily 10 am to 6 pm, closed Tuesday

    ADMISSION IN 2013
    10 euro | reduced 7,50
    children and young adults under 16 years free admission
    guided tours: Monday 11 am and 4 pm, Wednesday 4 pm
    Admission valid for the whole Royal Palace excluding the Historic Green Vault
    Entrance to the Historic Green Vault requires advance purchase of tickets for a specific entry time slot. A limited number of tickets is also sold every morning. The New Green Vault can be visited at any time.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    HISTORY MUSEUM - TURKISH CHAMBER

    by balhannah Updated Dec 1, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Courtesy David Brandt
    1 more image

    The Turkish Chamber in the Armory - Another fantastic museum!

    Another one of the best Museums in the World, well.... that is outside of Turkey!

    Items in here date back to the 1500s.
    Saxon kings both feared and admired the Ottoman Empire. Augustus the Strong, was one who admired and collected Ottoman treasures, including gold and silver horse gear, swords encrusted with sapphires, elaborately inlaid rifles and embroidered velvet pennants, beautiful riding gear, coats, textiles, helmets and more. He frequently dressed up as the Sultan in court festivities, imported Camels and Arabian horses with ornate bridles specifically for his Baroque festivals. He also sent one of his men to Constantinople to purchase exotic wares.
    Most of the art and weaponry on display was bought by the Saxon kings or given as gifts by ambassadors or Polish and Saxon aristocrats, only a small amount was seized in battles.

    Some wooden horses on show are not the original, they were burnt in WWII. A wood-carver had to make new ones so the jewel-encrusted riding equipment could be displayed.

    What is amazing in the exhibition, is the 300 year old Ottoman three-mast tent made of gold and silk. It's 20 metres long, 8 metres wide and 6 metres tall and stunning! In 1729, Augustus the Strong, bought this Tent to use at official events including royal weddings and military parades. We were able to enter the tent and have a close up look of the interior.
    .Altogether more than 600 objects are exhibited in the Turkish chamber

    ANOTHER MUST SEE! .......NO PHOTOS ALLOWED

    OPEN...Daily 10 am to 6 pm, closed Tuesdays

    ADMISSION IN 2013
    Valid for: New Green Vault, Armory at the New Giant's Hall, Turkish Chamber, Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs, Hausmannsturm, Fürstengalerie and current special exhibitions as well as The Dresden Damascus Room at the Japanisches Palais
    normal: 10,00 Euro (2 days: 15,00 Euro)
    reduced: 7,50 Euro (2 days: 11,00 Euro)
    children until 17 years: free
    audioguide: free

    Combination ticket Residenzschloss with ticket Historic Green Vault
    Valid for: Historic Green Vault, New Green Vault, Armoury at the New Giant's Hall, Turkish Chamber, Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs, Hausmannsturm, Fürstengalerie and current special exhibitions
    1 day: 19,50 Euro (2 days: 22,00 Euro), incl. audioguide

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE HISTORY MUSEUM - ARMORY

    by balhannah Updated Nov 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    Another Museum, another wow! - The best I have ever seen!

    Once again, the displays are well set out, a feast for the eyes to see!
    In this collection is a lot of weaponry and harnesses used by the Saxon rulers. What I loved, were the wonderful displays of horse and rider.
    There were so many decorated pieces of weaponry and armory, most were used by the royals for special occasions such as hunting parties, festivities, ceremonies and jousting tournaments.
    It was magnificent!!!
    Some pieces on display were received as royal gifts such as a gift from king Louis XIV of France, who donated six horses with magnificent harnesses as a token of friendship between Saxony and France.
    How about a 'golden suit of armor,' originally made in 1562-1564 by the Antwerp goldsmith for the Swedish king Eric XIV.
    More outstanding pieces are the first electoral sword (1425), a harness belonging to Elector Christian II (1591) and a sabre inlaid with gems, made for the coronation of Augustus the Strong in 1697.
    The Dresden Armory has one of the most valuable collections of weapons and armory in the world

    What a wonderful exhibition, one I thoroughly enjoyed. A MUST VISIT

    NO PHOTOS ALLOWED
    I bought some postcards, not the same though. There was so much I would have liked a photo of!

    OPEN....10 a.m. to 6 p.m., closed Tuesdays

    ADMISSION IN 2013..
    Ticket Residenzschloss
    Valid for: New Green Vault, Armoury at the New Giant's Hall, Turkish Chamber, Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs, Hausmannsturm, Fürstengalerie and current special exhibitions as well as The Dresden Damascus Room at the Japanisches Palais

    ADULTS 10,00 Euro (2 days: 15,00 Euro)
    CONCESSION 7,50 Euro (2 days: 11,00 Euro)
    children until 17 years: free audioguide: free

    Combination ticket Residenzschloss with ticket Historic Green Vault
    Valid for: Historic Green Vault, New Green Vault, Armoury at the New Giant's Hall, Turkish Chamber, Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs, Hausmannsturm, Fürstengalerie and current special exhibitions
    1 day: 19,50 Euro (2 days: 22,00 Euro), incl. audioguide

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    HAUSSMAN TOWER

    by balhannah Updated Nov 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Haussman Tower

    The Haussman Tower was built in the center of the north wing of the Royal Palace in the early 15th century. In 1991 it was rebuilt, so now visitors can climb to the top where a platform awaits them. I imagine the views would be great from here, as I noticed when walking around Dresden, I could always see this tall tower.

    ENTRY with the Dresden Card is FREE
    Adults 10 Euro Concession 7.50euros

    OPEN... April to October Wed - Mon 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tue closed

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE GEORGENBAU

    by balhannah Written Nov 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Georgenbau
    4 more images

    The Georgentor or Georgenbau is located between the Royal Palace and the Royal Mews and is the original city exit to the Elbe bridge. It is named after "George the Bearded," whose equestrian statue I could see high up in the center of the front façade.

    This was the first Renaissance building in Dresden, although it has been rebuilt many times through damage of some kind. What I liked, was the facade in neo-Renaissance style and the huge sandstone figures. I passed by them as I walked through the archway, where once horse & carriages used to go, now it's busy with pedestrians.
    Evidently, some of the scenes are religious and some represent life & death. The Motto written on the gate is "Through the devil's envy death entered into the world.'

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Schloss: Rüstkammer – Armoury

    by Kathrin_E Written Jul 4, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Strictly no photography inside, sorry

    The armoury of the Electors and Kings of Saxony used to be shown in Semper’s art gallery building by the Zwinger. It has recently found a new home: In spring 2013 the new presentation inside the renovated Schloss has opened to the public. The reconstructed “giant hall” (Riesensaal), a 16th century festival hall, is the frame for the presentation. Since this hall already disappeared in the 18th century, this is no detailed reconstruction but a modern version which consists of just the outlines.

    The Rüstkammer dates back to the 16th century. Precious pieces of armoury were collected at the courts. Inividual pieces were connected to a particular owner and particular events. Precious armour seems to have been a cherished gift that a princely wife would give to her husband.

    Most of the armour in the exhibition was not used in battle but for tournaments at court. They are masterpieces of craft with elaborate decorations. Fight scenes have been reconstructed in lifesize models of horses and riders to give an idea of the various competitions. The source or these reconstructions were original paintings from the palace which are displayed high up on the wall – don’t miss looking at them.

    Descriptions are provided in both German and English. There is also an audioguide available.

    Part of the fun is observing the visitors, especially families with small children. Show me a little boy between 3 and 6 who would not dream of being a knight in shiny armour! So cute...

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Stallhof

    by Kathrin_E Updated Jun 25, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The courtyard between the former stables of the palace have been beautifully restored and is now freely accessible from all three sides. The basin in the middle served as bath for the horses.
    The longitudinal courtyard was designed and built in the late 16th century for tournaments on horseback whioch were very popular at the Saxon court in the 16th and 17th century. The two pillars still tell of those competitions: they were installed for ring jousting. The windows above the arcades were the stands for the noble spectators. Sgrafitto ornaments embellish the facades.

    Photographers: Move around. Depending on your position you can catch interesting perspectives with the dome of Frauenkirche or the steeple of Hofkirche in the background.

    In Advent the stable courtyard hosts the medieval Christmas market. In 2007 a fire destroyed some stalls and caused damage to the facade of the adjacent wing, but this has been restored in the meantime.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Photography
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • EasyMalc's Profile Photo

    The Royal Palace

    by EasyMalc Updated May 12, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    The Royal Palace, or Residenzschloss, was the permanent residence of the Kings and Electors of Saxony from 1485 until the abdication of Augustus III in 1918.
    Starting out as a citadel in the 13th cent to protect the Elbe bridge it was transformed over the centuries to become one of the most significant renaissance buildings in Germany.
    The Allied bombing raids of 1945 left it in ruins and it remained so for many years until plans were put in place to restore it to its former glory.
    Most of the exterior re-construction work has been done and the Georgentor, Hausmannturm, and Stallhof can once again be admired for what they once were. At the time of writing, the Great Courtyard was still being renovated but is already looking impressive with its graffiti facades.
    The Georgentor is a gateway linking the palace to the Stallhof, an area which was originally used for jousting and the Hausmannturm can be climbed for some great views, particularly of the Hofkirche next door.
    The palace (or just Schloss as it’s sometimes called), is being re-built as a ‘Palace of the Arts and Sciences’ which means that several museums are to be housed inside the complex, the most famous of which is known as the Green Vault.
    The Green Vault is in actual fact 2 vaults - the New Green Vault and the Historic Green Vault - and between them they house one of the richest collections of jewels and treasures in the world, but I’ll have to take the experts word on this because I didn’t make into the museum myself.
    The other museums already up and running are the Kupferstich Kabinett (a collection of prints, drawings and photographs), the Munzkabinett (Coin Cabinet) and the Turckisch Cammer (Turkish Chamber).
    One other museum coming here, if it hasn’t already done so, is The Armoury which has been in temporary residence in the Sempergalerie wing of The Zwinger.
    The reconstruction and renovation of this once important building is now turning the Royal Palace back into a major attraction again. There’s still some work to be done but it’s already looking good again and a credit to those who had the foresight and will to make it happen.
    For up to date opening times and prices please refer to the website listed below.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace

    by Raimix Written Jan 4, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    2 more images

    Palace is known from 14th century, but it still had a castle look. After a fire it was reconstructed in 1701 by Augustus the Strong. After all, in Second World War, palace was destroyed again, most of valuable things were lost.

    Reconstruction started in 1985 and actually still continues now, but think it is minor things to as, as palace overall looks good.

    The most interesting thing in palace exterior is sgrafito of Procession of Princes, it is 101 meters long paintings, representing dynastry of Wettins. Nowadays palace houses Dresden State Art collections.

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Royal Palace Georgentor

    by BruceDunning Updated Dec 11, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Georgentor to the left of Hofkirche
    1 more image

    This is the main entrance into the palace complex and courtyard. It was taken from a distance to give perspective of location and ornate design. The main entrance first was from 1535, and in 1718 it was styled into Baroque. Later in 1902 it again was rebuilt. The name comes from rememberance of George the Bearded, whose figure on a horse is in the center

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Green Vault

    by BruceDunning Updated Dec 10, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Display of ceramic and gold vases
    2 more images

    This display of glitter and gold/silver is one of two located in the Royal Palace. This one is called the New Green Vault and the other-obviously the Old Green Vault, which is older of course. Entry to the new green is easier to get into. The other needs advance reservations most of the time.
    This is all royal treasures collected over the centuries. The first section of the art is was established 1723-1729 and shows over 1,000 pieces of ornate coffee services,stones carved to finite detail of figurines and faces, and so much more. The rest of the museum has another 2,000+ pieces to observe.
    Entry is 10 Euro, but a Dresden card for 24 Euro for 2 days may be better to see many museums. Open times is 10-6PM daily except for Tuesday

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Dresden

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

97 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Royal Palace
5.0 out of 5 stars
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
1 Review
0.2 miles away
Show Prices
4.5 out of 5 stars
5 Reviews
0.2 miles away
Show Prices

View all Dresden hotels