Royal Palace, Dresden

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  • Sgrafitto facade
    Sgrafitto facade
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    The horsepond
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    Royal Palace English Steps

    by BruceDunning Written Dec 10, 2011

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    View stairway and cherubs

    The English Steps/Stairway used to be only used by royal family and guest. Today it is the entry to the museums. The ticket collection point is also here. The original steps were built in 1692 and designed by Johann Starche to show it as a grand staircase around a central opening, and next year it was named English Staircase. Johann George IV became the envoy to Saxony; thereby the commemoration. In 1701 a fire destroyed the staircase, but got rebuilt in 1718-19. WWII damaged the stairs again and not until 1990's was something done to keep them from deteriorating further. In 2005, they got a final rework by totally dismantling and reassembling the stones.

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    Langer Gang-Long Corridor

    by BruceDunning Written Dec 9, 2011

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    Row of the arches columns

    The long corridor connects the Royal Palace to the Johanneum at the other end. the corridor was/is part of the table complex and is about 300 feet long. It was used in the old days for jousting and event. It apparently was designed and build in 1500's. The arched tuscan style columns had decorated hunting trophies on top and Saxon coats of arms and is painted with elaborate sgraffito. On the other side of this is the Procession of Princes mural

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    Turkish Kammer-Military Weapons

    by BruceDunning Written Dec 9, 2011

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    Collection of armor and weapons
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    This is a new addition to the Royal Palace museums, and it has a large number of Turk weapons and armor on display taken from the Turks during wars. There is also a large tent that depicts the living times of Turks military. The collection began around 1591 and an inventory was made and ready to display in 1674. it is the largest collection of Turk weapons outside of Turkey.
    Times of opening is 10-6PM Tuesday-Sunday and entry is 10 Euro, but you can get a 2 day Dresden card covering most museums for 42 Euro-cheaper

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    Residenzschloss for the rulers

    by BruceDunning Written Dec 9, 2011

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    View of the Royal Palace
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    The residence that dates back to a beginning of 1548-1556 when it was contracted for by Duke Bartigen, but before that in the 1200's there was a castle on the grounds. It caught fire in 1701 but was rebuilt and expanded by Augustus the Strong. Over the years additions mixed in Baroque style architecture with the Renaissance. It was remodeled for a major part in 1889, then nearly totally destroyed in WWII. They rebuilt it again starting in 1989, and later it opened for museums, with total completion in 2006. Today it again is under major renovation, with completion expected in early 2013; mostly in the courtyard. There are three courtyards, and mural sgraffito paintings on the walls, connector alleyways, and an adjacent church. The main feature is the Hausmann tower located by the Georgenbau, the beautiful sandstone building. It is standing about 330 feet tall that was completed in 1676. The views of the area are great from there. Tickets at 3 Euro are required to go up the 327 steps, but for right now you can only go up 2/3 of the way, and the coin collection up there is closed.
    It became a museum complex starting in 2006, and today has the New Green vault, and Historic Green Vault, Kuperstich Kabinet which is a collection of prints, drawings and photos with many famed artists works, and the Munzcabinet-coin collection if it was open but was not when we were there, and a new addition is the Turkish Room which has peices form the souvenirs taken during wars with Turks.

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    Seufzerbrücke

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 28, 2011

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    Seufzerbr��cke
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    Seufzerbrücke or Seufzer Bridge reminded me the Bridge of Sighs in Venice Seufzerbrücke is a Dresden's version of this famous Venice Bridge. It connects the Royal Castle and the Hofkirche.

    You can watch my 4 min 23 sec Video Dresden in August of 2002 out of my Youtube channel.

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    Altstadt

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 28, 2011

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    Altstadt
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    The strengthened town-planning achieves the apogee during board of August Strong (1694-1733) and his son Fridrih August II (1733-1763).
    Dresden was built up with brilliant buildings in style of a baroque and became the cultural center of the European level.
    In 1806 king Fridrih August I declares Dresden as the royal capital and the residence. After formation in 1871 of the German Empire Dresden experiences the second rise of building activity.

    The city is still being restored after destructions of the last war. 65 years passed, but ruins are still visible in the old city. For 15 years while I observed restoration of Dresden, there were significant transformations. I admire persistence of Germans!

    You can watch my 6 min 03 sec Video Dresden Altstadt in November of 1995 out of my Youtube channel.

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    Stallhof and Langer Gang

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 13, 2011

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    Stallhof and Langer Gang
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    The Stallhof with its riding and jousting track is located behind the Johanneum. It was probably designed by Govanni Maria Nosseni at the end of the 16th century. The 100 m hall with its Tuscan columns architecture displays the coat of the Saxon states.

    The Stallhof is one of the few remaining artifacts of the glittering renaissance era in Dresden. As the venue for "courtly tournaments" in which competitors had to display skill and sportsmanship, it still attracts visitors today.

    The Stallhof is somewhat overshadowed by the famous Dresden building, the "Kurfürstliche Reissige Stall". But it is nonetheless one of the last remaining buildings from Dresden's glittering renaissance era. Even at the time of its construction it attracted a great deal of praise.

    It was completed in 1591 under the Elector Christian I., and the Stallhof served as the venue for courtly tournaments, coursing and jousting. Two bronze pillars designed by Giovanni Maria Nosseni are reminders of this courtly display of skill, in which competitors tried to spear a suspended ring with a lance.

    The Langer Gang (long corridor), a long arcaded open structure, connects the Johanneum with the Georgenbau, the central building of the Royal Palace. It was constructed in the 16th century as part of the palace's Stallhof (stables courtyard) to house the horses.

    White painted Tuscan columns decorated with hunting trophies support the elegant structure which is decorated with sgraffito and Saxon coats-of-arms. The almost 100 meter long arcade flanks a courtyard was used to hold jousting tournaments. Spectators could watch the spectacle from the Langer Gang.

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    Georgentor and Georgenbau

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 13, 2011

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    Georgentor
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    The Georgentor Gate was built in 1535. It was the first Renaissance building in Dresden, originally was the town’s fortress’ exit to the river Elbe.
    The Georgentor was the first part of the Schloss to be restored after the war (1964-69).
    There is a Renaissance doorway from the original building at the west side. The sculptural decoration, including the equestrian statue of Duke George, was the work of Christian Behrens.

    The oldest part of the Royal Palace is the Georgenbau, a beautiful sandstone building in renaissance style. The building features the Hausmann Tower.

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    Hausmannsturm

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 13, 2011

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    Hausmannsturm
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    Hausmannsturm or Hausmann Tower is a part of the Royal palace and has a viewing platform, from where visitors have a great view over Dresden's historic center.
    Access to the Hausmann tower is via the Royal Palace. You can climb the steps to the top. I haven’t been there – may be next time…

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    Royal Palace

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 13, 2011

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    Royal Palace
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    Dresden Castle or Dresdner Residenzschloss is one of the oldest buildings in Dresden and has been the residence over more than seven centuries of the Electors (1547–1806) and Kings from the House of Wettin (1806–1918) of Saxony. One of the most fascinating qualities of the castle is the multitude of architectural styles found in it, from Baroque to Neo-renaissance.

    Today you can find several museums in the castle: Green Vault (Grünes Gewölbe), Armoury, Copperplate Engraving Cabinet (Kupferstichkabinett), Coin Cabinet (Münzkabinett), Middle Ages Section of the Sculpture Collection (Skulpturensammlung).

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    New Green Vault

    by german_eagle Updated Dec 28, 2010

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    Royal Court in Delhi
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    This incredible collection of jewelleries is definitely a "must see" in Dresden. Most of the pieces were created in 16th to 18th centuries.

    Some of the unique masterworks of art were made by the Dinglinger brothers, e.g. the Golden Coffee Set (1701) and the "Royal Court in Delhi at Grand Mogul Aureng Zeb's Birthday" (1701-08) - (picture 1). The latter consists of 137 figures with more than 3000 diamonds, rubins, smaragds and pearls.

    For decades after WWII there had been a temporary exhibition in the Albertinum which was closed when the pieces were moved to the Royal Palace some years ago. The historical (original) rooms in the Royal Palace were restored and reopened, too. This tip is about the NEW Green Vault. It is located on the Royal Palace's second floor in modern style designed rooms. About 40% of the pieces are on display here, for the rest you'll have to go the Historic Green Vault.

    A personal opinion: The pieces displayed in the New Green Vault are definitely masterpieces of craftmanship and IMO of even higher quality/more interesting than those in the Historical Green Vault ... but it takes too much time to watch each one and take all in what you see. So you may leave the exhibition tired if you try to see everything. Pick the most famous pieces only.

    My favourite pieces are the two mentioned above, of course, the carved cherry stones, the reticulated glass plate, the naturally green diamond.

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    Royal Palace

    by german_eagle Updated Dec 19, 2010

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    Royal Palace (right) from Theaterplatz
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    The Royal Palace has been one of Germany's most important and beautiful Renaissance, later Baroque style buildings for centuries. It was destroyed in WWII, but is under reconstruction which will take at least until 2013 (optimistic version).

    You can already visit the Hausmann tower from where you have the best view (at least in my opinion) of Dresden's old town. It also offers views of the big courtyard of the Royal Palace (still under reconstruction, but not far from completion) with beautiful sgraffito decorated facades - and you can have a close look at the huge sculptures on the roof of the Cathedral. On one of the floors of the tower the State Art Collections show a small but nice exhibit of coins. On another floor you can see a small but very moving exhibit about the destruction of the city in 1945 (reports from survivors).

    You are free to wander around in the restored smaller courtyard which is enclosed with a glass roof - an interesting modern structure. The courtyard still has the Renaissance atmosphere from centuries ago (loggia!). Also, have a look into the building and see the remains of the original sgraffiti on the ground floor.

    A number of departments of the State Art Collections already opened exhibits in the Royal Palace: The Collection of Prints and Drawings with more than a half million pieces one of the largest and most important worldwide, both the Historical and New Green Vaults and the Turkish chamber. There is also a picture gallery with the portraits of the Saxon rulers on the second floor. And the Baroque English staircase is finished. From time to time special exhibitions are on display in different parts of the Palace.

    Don't miss the "Stallhof", the former stable and place for knight's tournaments (jousting yard). The yard breathes Italian Renaissance atmosphere with arcades, Tuscan style pillars and sgrafitti. At its front outside at Augustusstrasse you see the "Fürstenzug" (procession of princes). It is a 101 meters long genealogical gallery of Saxony's Royal family Wettin, made of Meissen porcelain tiles 1906/07 (originally a sgrafitto work 1872/76).

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    Residenzschloss

    by pieter_jan_v Written Jul 2, 2010

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    Residenzschloss - Dresden
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    The Residenzschloss or Royal Palace was the home to the Kings of Saksen.

    Nowadays parts of the palace are in use by the " Staatlichen Kunstsammlungen Dresden" which houses the following attractions:

    -Kupferstich-Kabinett
    Rhis museum displays a collection of prints, drawings and photographs. Works by Dürer, van Eyck, Rembrandt, Michelangelo, Fragonard, Caspar David Friedrich, Toulouse-Lautrec, Picasso and Baselitz are part of the collection of 515,000 items.

    Admission fee: Euro 10.00 (adult)
    Hours: We-Mo: 10AM - 6PM

    -Public Library
    Free entrance
    Hours: Mo-Fr: 10AM - 6PM

    -Rüstkammer or Armoury
    In the so-called Türckische Cammer astonishing armour made through the ages are on display. Breathtaking are the eight handcarved wooden horses.

    Admission fee: Euro 10.00 (adult)
    Hours: We-Mo: 10AM - 6PM

    -Grünes Gewölbe or Green Vault
    This is one of the richest treasure chambers in Europe. Amazing pieces of jewelry and other priceless items are on display.

    Admission fee: Euro 10.00 (adult)
    Hours: We-Mo: 10AM - 6PM

    -Münzkabinett or Coin Cabinet
    With 300,000 items this museum located in the Hausmannsturm has the most to offer in numbers. Expect to see every thing related to the art of coin making through the ages here.

    Admission fee: Euro 10.00 (adult)
    Hours: Summers only; We-Mo: 10AM - 6PM

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    Grünes Gewölbe - Green Vault

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 12, 2010

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    A glimpse through the window in the evening
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    The Green Vault is the treasure chamber of the Saxon Electors and Kings. The court treasures, the most remarkable masterpieces of arts and crafts in gold and silver, precious stones, ivory, and naturalia from overseas.

    The Historical Green Vault is a reconstruction of the baroque rooms and presentation which has only been completed a few years ago. It shows how the collection was presented in times of August the Strong and his successor and gives an impression of the sheer mass of precious things the court owned. A closer look, however, reveals that the reconstruction is simplified, the decorations are painted instead of woodcarving, stucco or metal work, etc.
    Access to the Historical Green Vault is limited to 20 people at a time, which is pleasant as soon as you are inside but requires some planning and effort. Tickets must be booked weeks, if not months in advance depending on the season. You have a time slot of 15 minutes and if you are late your ticket is lost (calculate enough time to deposit your bags and coats at the cloak desk BEFORE your time slot begins). WEBSITE
    Website for ticket bookings: http://www.skd-dresden.de/en/museen/gruenes_gewoelbe/Online_Ticket_Buchung_HGG.html

    However, 200 tickets per day are kept aside and sold at the cash desk, so there is a chance to get in on the same day. The ticket counter opens at 10 a.m. and lines will be long. In March, being there at 9 a.m. was early enough to be number five in the line and get hold of a ticket for 10 a.m., but that was low season. In high season I’d recommend being there even earlier.
    There are no text boards and explanations in the rooms, you receive an audioguide. Unfortunately the audioguide is crap. It has a short general explanation about the room and its contents but if a piece is mentioned it does not leave enough time to find it. There are hardly any descriptions of single pieces – one would wish for a second level of numbers to look up to find out more about individual artworks but this is missing altogether. I found this audioguide rather useless.

    The New Green Vault one floor higher is a modern museum without baroque ambience but it presents the most spectacular pieces, like the miniature Court of the Indian Prince Aurang Zeb. For the New Green Vault there are no limitations, you buy a ticket and walk in on the spot. If you didn’t manage to get tickets for the Historical Green Vault, this is an alternative to consider. Take your time and have a very close look at the details of those elaborate art works.

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    Between the Castle and the Cathedral

    by Kakapo2 Written Sep 17, 2008

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    Baroque bridge linking castle and cathedral.

    This neo-Baroque bridge, darker and a bit duller than the one that connects Taschenbergpalais and castle, is located between the northern wing of the castle (called Elbflügel) and the cathedral St. Trinitatis.

    Like the other one it was built during the overhaul of the castle between 1889 and 1901. In the background you see Georgenbau and Hausmannsturm.

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