Royal Palace, Dresden

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  • Sgrafitto facade
    Sgrafitto facade
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    Stallhof and Langer Gang

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 13, 2011

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    The Stallhof with its riding and jousting track is located behind the Johanneum. It was probably designed by Govanni Maria Nosseni at the end of the 16th century. The 100 m hall with its Tuscan columns architecture displays the coat of the Saxon states.

    The Stallhof is one of the few remaining artifacts of the glittering renaissance era in Dresden. As the venue for "courtly tournaments" in which competitors had to display skill and sportsmanship, it still attracts visitors today.

    The Stallhof is somewhat overshadowed by the famous Dresden building, the "Kurfürstliche Reissige Stall". But it is nonetheless one of the last remaining buildings from Dresden's glittering renaissance era. Even at the time of its construction it attracted a great deal of praise.

    It was completed in 1591 under the Elector Christian I., and the Stallhof served as the venue for courtly tournaments, coursing and jousting. Two bronze pillars designed by Giovanni Maria Nosseni are reminders of this courtly display of skill, in which competitors tried to spear a suspended ring with a lance.

    The Langer Gang (long corridor), a long arcaded open structure, connects the Johanneum with the Georgenbau, the central building of the Royal Palace. It was constructed in the 16th century as part of the palace's Stallhof (stables courtyard) to house the horses.

    White painted Tuscan columns decorated with hunting trophies support the elegant structure which is decorated with sgraffito and Saxon coats-of-arms. The almost 100 meter long arcade flanks a courtyard was used to hold jousting tournaments. Spectators could watch the spectacle from the Langer Gang.

    Stallhof and Langer Gang Stallhof and Langer Gang

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    Georgentor and Georgenbau

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 13, 2011

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    The Georgentor Gate was built in 1535. It was the first Renaissance building in Dresden, originally was the town’s fortress’ exit to the river Elbe.
    The Georgentor was the first part of the Schloss to be restored after the war (1964-69).
    There is a Renaissance doorway from the original building at the west side. The sculptural decoration, including the equestrian statue of Duke George, was the work of Christian Behrens.

    The oldest part of the Royal Palace is the Georgenbau, a beautiful sandstone building in renaissance style. The building features the Hausmann Tower.

    Georgentor Georgentor
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    Hausmannsturm

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 13, 2011

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    Hausmannsturm or Hausmann Tower is a part of the Royal palace and has a viewing platform, from where visitors have a great view over Dresden's historic center.
    Access to the Hausmann tower is via the Royal Palace. You can climb the steps to the top. I haven’t been there – may be next time…

    Hausmannsturm Hausmannsturm Hausmannsturm Hausmannsturm
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    Seufzerbrücke

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 28, 2011

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    Seufzerbrücke or Seufzer Bridge reminded me the Bridge of Sighs in Venice Seufzerbrücke is a Dresden's version of this famous Venice Bridge. It connects the Royal Castle and the Hofkirche.

    You can watch my 4 min 23 sec Video Dresden in August of 2002 out of my Youtube channel.

    Seufzerbr��cke Seufzerbr��cke Seufzerbr��cke Seufzerbr��cke Seufzerbr��cke
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    Needs to be viewed from many angles

    by Ekaterinburg Updated Mar 18, 2008

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    The main photo shows the west wing of the castle viewed from Theater Platz and it was this view that led me to consider it 'not so palatial.' From here it doesn't look very impressive but the towers and cupolas are a hint and when you actually get round to the Schloss Platz entrance you get a look at the more imposing interior courtyard. Here, all the facades have been meticulously restored and decorated with 'sgraffito', resulting in the white, plaster cast-gilding appearance of the walls. Above it all is the black cupola of the Hausmann Tower ( which can be climbed for panoramic views ) and entry is via the multi-gabled and exquisite, Renaissance Georgenbau Palace.

    The outbuildings of the Palace have been restored as well and the stable yard or Johanneum is now open to the public. The Transport Museum is located here and it's also used as a market place. When we passed the Christmas Market was in full swing ( photo 2) and of the three Christmas Markets I saw in Dresden this one certainly had the most impressive location.

    West wing of the palace, viewed from Theater Platz Christmas Market in the Royal Stables
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    Altstadt

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 28, 2011

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    The strengthened town-planning achieves the apogee during board of August Strong (1694-1733) and his son Fridrih August II (1733-1763).
    Dresden was built up with brilliant buildings in style of a baroque and became the cultural center of the European level.
    In 1806 king Fridrih August I declares Dresden as the royal capital and the residence. After formation in 1871 of the German Empire Dresden experiences the second rise of building activity.

    The city is still being restored after destructions of the last war. 65 years passed, but ruins are still visible in the old city. For 15 years while I observed restoration of Dresden, there were significant transformations. I admire persistence of Germans!

    You can watch my 6 min 03 sec Video Dresden Altstadt in November of 1995 out of my Youtube channel.

    Altstadt Altstadt Old city
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    Royal Palace

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 13, 2011

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    Dresden Castle or Dresdner Residenzschloss is one of the oldest buildings in Dresden and has been the residence over more than seven centuries of the Electors (1547–1806) and Kings from the House of Wettin (1806–1918) of Saxony. One of the most fascinating qualities of the castle is the multitude of architectural styles found in it, from Baroque to Neo-renaissance.

    Today you can find several museums in the castle: Green Vault (Grünes Gewölbe), Armoury, Copperplate Engraving Cabinet (Kupferstichkabinett), Coin Cabinet (Münzkabinett), Middle Ages Section of the Sculpture Collection (Skulpturensammlung).

    Royal Palace Royal Palace Royal Palace Royal Palace Royal Palace
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    Königlich-Sächisches Residenzschloss - The Castle

    by Kakapo2 Written Sep 17, 2008

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    The residence of the royals of Saxony, one of Europe’s most significant Renaissance castles, is very complex, and so much integrated in impressive surrounding buildings that sometimes you do not know what is part of the castle and what is not. It has three courtyards, and very precious portals, its own cathedral (Hofkirche), and a great viewing tower (Hausmannsturm). In the major courtyard (west wing) you can admire the most wonderful sgraffito paintings on the façades.

    The castle was first mentioned in 1289. From 1548 it was built for Herzog Georg den Bärtigen (Duke George the Bearded) in Renaissance style. After the big city fire from 1701 the audience halls got Baroque interiors. Alterations were made from 1889 to 1901 in neo-Renaissance style – just to last until the British bombs in February 1945 destroyed it completely.

    Most of the reconstruction was completed in 2006 for the 800 year anniversary. The works had started 20 years earlier.

    The most famous part of the castle is the Historisches und Neues Grünes Gewölbe, opened in 2004 and 2006. It holds fantastic art exhibits from the 16th to the 18th century, spectacularly presented. (The entrance is at Bärengarten, opposite Taschenbergpalais, in the western wing of the castle. Limited access. Tickets on www.dresden-tourist.de)

    All museums in the castle are closed on Tuesday. On all other days open from 10am to 6pm. Info: www.skd-dresden.de

    The castle with Hausmannsturm and church (left).
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    Royal Palace

    by german_eagle Updated Dec 19, 2010

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    The Royal Palace has been one of Germany's most important and beautiful Renaissance, later Baroque style buildings for centuries. It was destroyed in WWII, but is under reconstruction which will take at least until 2013 (optimistic version).

    You can already visit the Hausmann tower from where you have the best view (at least in my opinion) of Dresden's old town. It also offers views of the big courtyard of the Royal Palace (still under reconstruction, but not far from completion) with beautiful sgraffito decorated facades - and you can have a close look at the huge sculptures on the roof of the Cathedral. On one of the floors of the tower the State Art Collections show a small but nice exhibit of coins. On another floor you can see a small but very moving exhibit about the destruction of the city in 1945 (reports from survivors).

    You are free to wander around in the restored smaller courtyard which is enclosed with a glass roof - an interesting modern structure. The courtyard still has the Renaissance atmosphere from centuries ago (loggia!). Also, have a look into the building and see the remains of the original sgraffiti on the ground floor.

    A number of departments of the State Art Collections already opened exhibits in the Royal Palace: The Collection of Prints and Drawings with more than a half million pieces one of the largest and most important worldwide, both the Historical and New Green Vaults and the Turkish chamber. There is also a picture gallery with the portraits of the Saxon rulers on the second floor. And the Baroque English staircase is finished. From time to time special exhibitions are on display in different parts of the Palace.

    Don't miss the "Stallhof", the former stable and place for knight's tournaments (jousting yard). The yard breathes Italian Renaissance atmosphere with arcades, Tuscan style pillars and sgrafitti. At its front outside at Augustusstrasse you see the "Fürstenzug" (procession of princes). It is a 101 meters long genealogical gallery of Saxony's Royal family Wettin, made of Meissen porcelain tiles 1906/07 (originally a sgrafitto work 1872/76).

    Royal Palace (right) from Theaterplatz Royal Palace (from Schlossplatz) smaller courtyard with loggia and glass roof big courtyard with sgraffiti and loggia English staircase
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    Royal palace and Hausman tower.

    by hundwalder Updated Jun 11, 2005

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    Dresden Altstadt is filled with magnificent renaissance and baroque architecture. Most of it is located within 200 meters of the Elbe River, and can easily be seen on foot. Details on the Royal palace later.

    Dresden is perfect to visit in conjunction with Prague. The cities are 100 km. apart by highway and autobahn or rail. The scenery all along the route is spectacular, and there are many fascinating places to stop if you have the time.

    royal palace & tower
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    THE ROYAL PALACE

    by balhannah Updated Dec 3, 2013

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    The Royal Palace is across the road from the Zwinger.

    Its history goes back to the 13th century when a fort was built here, then in the 15th century, the Hausmann Tower was built. In 1530, George the Bearded - Duke of Saxony, commissioned the construction of the Georgenbau, the original city Gate and exit to the Elbe bridge. In 1701, fire destroyed a large part of the Palace and the Georgenbau which was soon rebuilt in Baroque style by Augustus the Strong.
    The Royal Palace was also destroyed during WWII in 1945. It sat for 40 years in ruins before rebuilding the whole Palace was started in 1985 and completed in 2006, just in time for the city's 800 year anniversary. The Georgenbau was rebuilt again, and finally completed in 1969.

    Now the Royal Palace is home to many fabulous Museums which are a MUST SEE when in Dresden.
    Museums are closed on TUESDAYS, something to remember if you come from a country like I do, where Museums are closed on Mondays!

    Parts are still under restoration, this was in 2013.

    Open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
    Admission charge

    Royal Palace Royal Palace
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    THE GREEN VAULT & NEW GREEN VAULT

    by balhannah Updated Dec 1, 2013

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    One of the richest and largest treasure chambers in Europe! Another wonderful Museum for me!

    Why is it named the "GREEN VAULT?"
    Easy! It is named after the formerly malachite green painted column bases and capitals of the initial rooms.

    There are two Green Vaults, so be warned, leave enough time to see both, it is worth it!
    Once again, we have Augustus the Strong to thank for this wonderful collection of treasures. He commanded his private chambers to be turned into splendid rooms in which to display his collection.

    So, when you come, not only look at the displays, but also look at the beautiful rooms.
    What you can expect to see is collections of valuables, including bronze statues and works of art in silver, gold, amber and ivory, enamel works, carved art pieces and small statues, pieces made from real ivory and the silver table service of Augustus the Strong.

    You will see this over 9 rooms, each organized by material. The first room shows off amber, next is the Ivory Room, which also displays statuettes, vessels and goblets, next the White Silver Room and so on.....
    The Hall of Treasures, the largest and completely mirrored room, contains vessels made of colored gems and amber, mussels and ostrich eggs. Also on display is a collection of artworks made from rock crystal.
    The Coats of Arms Room, has copper and gilded coats of arms of the Saxon provinces and the Polish state coat of arms.
    TheJewel Chamber has the crown jewels of the Saxon-Polish royalty and rings, chains, medallions and gems, plus the statue "Moor with Emerald Cluster" The statue was created because Augustus the Strong wanted to exhibit a precious emerald cluster, studded with 16 dark green emeralds, in his new Schatzkammer museum. This "miracle of nature", came from a Colombian mine,and was given to him as a gift in 1581. The "moor" is actually a South American Indian, who presents the Colombian emerald cluster on a tray of tortoiseshell.
    On display is the "Dresden White" or "Saxon White" a 49.71 carat diamond and a 48-carat sapphire, a present from czar Peter I of Russia.
    How many of you have seen anything like the "Court of the Great Mogul Aurangzeb", which incorporates 4,909 diamonds, 160 rubies, 164 emeralds, one sapphire, 16 pearls and two cameos, or something similar - I haven't, so I found this an amazing exhibit!

    I could go on, there is so much to see! DO VISIT, IT IS ANOTHER MUST SEE IN DRESDEN.

    NO PHOTOS ALLOWED - Once again I had to buy postcards

    OPEN Daily 10 am to 6 pm, closed Tuesday

    ADMISSION IN 2013
    10 euro | reduced 7,50
    children and young adults under 16 years free admission
    guided tours: Monday 11 am and 4 pm, Wednesday 4 pm
    Admission valid for the whole Royal Palace excluding the Historic Green Vault
    Entrance to the Historic Green Vault requires advance purchase of tickets for a specific entry time slot. A limited number of tickets is also sold every morning. The New Green Vault can be visited at any time.

    Moor with Emerald cluster
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  • Residenzschloss and other stuff in the old town

    by sabsi Updated Jul 6, 2006

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    Dresden's old town is one of the nicest areas I have ever seen in Germany. It's not large, rather small actually, you will have seen everything from the outside on an hour walk.

    It's not even old, almost everything was destroyed during the terrible air raids of WWII in just one night in 1945. Most of the buildings are rebuilt. You wouldn't realise if you didn't know this though...

    Let me take you on a photographic walk around the old town. Just to give you an impression on what to see here I have added some pictures here for you. I don't even know every building on the pictures or much about it ... Sometimes it's just too nice to just enjoy the views and not read about what you are seeing...

    The royal palace is still under reconstruction these days. However, around it there are some very scenic spots for picture taking like this bridge between the castle and the cathedral.

    Connection between castle and cathedral A long mural leading to the Frauenkirche A long mural leading to the Frauenkirche Hotel Taschenbergpalais, one of the cheapest ;) Cosel Palais

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    New Green Vault

    by german_eagle Updated Dec 28, 2010

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    This incredible collection of jewelleries is definitely a "must see" in Dresden. Most of the pieces were created in 16th to 18th centuries.

    Some of the unique masterworks of art were made by the Dinglinger brothers, e.g. the Golden Coffee Set (1701) and the "Royal Court in Delhi at Grand Mogul Aureng Zeb's Birthday" (1701-08) - (picture 1). The latter consists of 137 figures with more than 3000 diamonds, rubins, smaragds and pearls.

    For decades after WWII there had been a temporary exhibition in the Albertinum which was closed when the pieces were moved to the Royal Palace some years ago. The historical (original) rooms in the Royal Palace were restored and reopened, too. This tip is about the NEW Green Vault. It is located on the Royal Palace's second floor in modern style designed rooms. About 40% of the pieces are on display here, for the rest you'll have to go the Historic Green Vault.

    A personal opinion: The pieces displayed in the New Green Vault are definitely masterpieces of craftmanship and IMO of even higher quality/more interesting than those in the Historical Green Vault ... but it takes too much time to watch each one and take all in what you see. So you may leave the exhibition tired if you try to see everything. Pick the most famous pieces only.

    My favourite pieces are the two mentioned above, of course, the carved cherry stones, the reticulated glass plate, the naturally green diamond.

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    The Royal Palace

    by EasyMalc Updated May 12, 2013

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    The Royal Palace, or Residenzschloss, was the permanent residence of the Kings and Electors of Saxony from 1485 until the abdication of Augustus III in 1918.
    Starting out as a citadel in the 13th cent to protect the Elbe bridge it was transformed over the centuries to become one of the most significant renaissance buildings in Germany.
    The Allied bombing raids of 1945 left it in ruins and it remained so for many years until plans were put in place to restore it to its former glory.
    Most of the exterior re-construction work has been done and the Georgentor, Hausmannturm, and Stallhof can once again be admired for what they once were. At the time of writing, the Great Courtyard was still being renovated but is already looking impressive with its graffiti facades.
    The Georgentor is a gateway linking the palace to the Stallhof, an area which was originally used for jousting and the Hausmannturm can be climbed for some great views, particularly of the Hofkirche next door.
    The palace (or just Schloss as it’s sometimes called), is being re-built as a ‘Palace of the Arts and Sciences’ which means that several museums are to be housed inside the complex, the most famous of which is known as the Green Vault.
    The Green Vault is in actual fact 2 vaults - the New Green Vault and the Historic Green Vault - and between them they house one of the richest collections of jewels and treasures in the world, but I’ll have to take the experts word on this because I didn’t make into the museum myself.
    The other museums already up and running are the Kupferstich Kabinett (a collection of prints, drawings and photographs), the Munzkabinett (Coin Cabinet) and the Turckisch Cammer (Turkish Chamber).
    One other museum coming here, if it hasn’t already done so, is The Armoury which has been in temporary residence in the Sempergalerie wing of The Zwinger.
    The reconstruction and renovation of this once important building is now turning the Royal Palace back into a major attraction again. There’s still some work to be done but it’s already looking good again and a credit to those who had the foresight and will to make it happen.
    For up to date opening times and prices please refer to the website listed below.

    The Great Courtyard The Hausmannturm The Stallhof
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