Dresden Transportation

  • Dresden
    Dresden
    by balhannah
  • Dresden
    Dresden
    by balhannah
  • Dresden
    Dresden
    by balhannah

Best Rated Transportation in Dresden

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    DB Call-a-Bike

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 16, 2008

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    1. CallBikes at the Dresden main station
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    The German Railway System DB has recently expanded its Call-a-Bike program (which I described in detail in a tip on my Karlsruhe page) to include a minimal presence in a large number of German cities, including Dresden.

    In this stripped-down version of Call-a-Bike, you can only check out and return bikes at the main railroad station, and nowhere else. Which is all right if you just want to have a quick look around between trains, but not nearly as flexible and useful as the full-scale Call-a-Bike systems in Berlin, Munich, Frankfurt am Main, Cologne, Stuttgart and Karlsruhe.

    Anyway, I tried it out in September 2008 on my first afternoon in Dresden, checking out a bike using my cell phone and riding it all around for just over two hours. This was fine except that every time I wanted to stop and have a closer look at something the clock kept running while I had the bike locked up somewhere. In the end I kept the bike for two hours and two minutes, which cost me EUR 7.38 on my next credit card bill. This is quite a bit when you consider that in Paris I only paid seven Euros for an entire week of intensive cycling on the Velib' bikes.

    In Dresden and other cities Call-a-Bike has a daily rate of nine Euros, in other words they stop counting after nine Euros and let you use the bike for the rest of the day.

    Recently I filled out an online customer satisfaction questionnaire for the Call-a-Bikes. I gave them generally good marks, but noted that for many trips I would much prefer to take my own bike along on the train -- which DB stubbornly refuses to allow on its long-distance trains, particularly the InterCityExpress (ICE).

    Second photo: My CallBike on the Carola Bridge over the Elbe River.

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    • Cycling

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    NextBike

    by Nemorino Updated Mar 5, 2013

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    1. Close-up of a NextBike
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    NextBike is a private bicycle sharing system that is quite similar to DB Call-a-Bike except that it is partially paid for by advertising directly on the bike -- and it is cheaper. Rental of a NextBike costs one Euro per half hour or nine Euros for up to 24 hours -- nine Euros as opposed to fifteen for Call-a-Bike. (Prices as of 2013.)

    Online registration for NextBike is easy provided you are willing to give them your credit card number and cell phone number. Registration costs nine Euros, but this amount is applied to your first bike rentals.

    I had already been registered with NextBike for a while, but Dresden was the first place I had a chance to try it out. I checked out a bike at the main station, rode it through the Großer Garten to the Adult Education Center, left it locked up there all afternoon and then rode it back when I was finished with my workshop.

    Aside from being cheaper, I found NextBike to be somewhat less hassle than Call-a-Bike -- though you do need a cell phone for both.

    NextBike is currently available in Dresden, Erlangen, Frankfurt am Main and Nürnberg, and they say it will be expanding soon to include nine more German cities and even some in Austria and New Zealand.

    Second photo: My NextBike in the Großer Garten (Large Park).

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    • Cycling

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Bus Berlin – Dresden – Berlin

    by Raimix Updated Jan 25, 2013

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    Thanks to VT member german_eagle I got to know nice company Berlin Bus Linen with nice discounts to go to different places in Germany from Berlin, also to some neighbor countries, as Denmark, Netherlands or France.

    So, I got a ticket Berlin – Dresden – Berlin for only 18 Euros, the time was fixed and ticket not refundable if you don’t use it. I reserved it maybe 1 month before my trip.

    I took a ride Berlin – Dresden with a nice old man, who was explaining some facts about Dresden (it was his hometown), I am happy to understand a bit, as it was in German :)

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  • Raimix's Profile Photo

    Trams in Dresden

    by Raimix Written Dec 30, 2012

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    Dresden has a nice network of trams. I used them to reach my hosts living place, but I didn‘t need it for moving around historical part of Dresden, as it is quite compact.

    As I needed to use more than two rides per day, I bought a one day tickets for 5 Euros, one ticket price was 2 euros, so if you go more than two times per day, it is not worth buying single ticket.

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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Ferries

    by german_eagle Updated Mar 31, 2012

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    People/Car ferry Kleinzschachwitz - Pillnitz
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    A special mode of transportation in Dresden are the ferries. Currently there are four which cross the Elbe river.

    Most of them are for people and bicycles etc. only, but there is one in Pillnitz (near the Palace) which is for cars, too. For this one please note the order of boarding: first the cars, then the motorbikes, then bicycles, then pedestrians (see pic 5!)

    The ferries operate from morning till evening on demand, roughly from 6 am till 10 pm. The fare is 1 Euro for adults, 0.70 Euro for bicycles, but they are also included in the public transportation network tickets. This means, if you bought and validated a single trip ticket for 2 Euro to get from the old town to Pillnitz Palace and arrive by tram in Kleinzschachwitz you can still take the ferry, given that you didn't spend too much time taking photos since that single trip ticket is valid for one hour.

    A ticket for a car is 3 Euro, this includes the driver, not the other passengers.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Increased bicycle use in Dresden

    by Nemorino Written Dec 16, 2008

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    1. A musician cycling in Dresden
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    According to the city administration, bicycle usage in Dresden for journeys to and from work increased by 40 % from 2002 to 2007.

    In the same period, bicycle usage for shopping increased by 60 %, and leisure-time cycling increased by 17 %. The age group from 35 to 54 had the greatest increase in bicycle use and correspondingly the greatest decrease in car usage.

    The downside of this is that there has inevitably also been an increase in bicycle-related accidents.

    One of the city's bicycle projects is the restoration and rebuilding of the Elbe Cycle Path, which includes some 50 Kilometers in the city of Dresden alone. This path along the banks of the Elbe River was passable until well into the 1950s, but then gradually fell into disrepair during the time of the GDR regime. Since 1990 the city has been restoring and rebuilding this path, which is now passable and also newly signposted. (I tried parts of it on my CallBike in September 2008 and found it very smooth and pleasant.)

    Additional photos: More cyclists in Dresden.

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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Funicular

    by german_eagle Updated Nov 20, 2010

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    funicular
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    Dresden has one of the oldest funiculars in Europe. It was built in 1895 and after some renovations (the latest in the 90s) it is still running!

    It operates between Körnerplatz square (Dresden-Loschwitz) and Dresden Weisser Hirsch, both favourite residential areas in the east of Dresden.

    Elevation difference is 99 m, length 590 m (of which 140 m in two tunnels). At the upper station you find the well-know restaurant Luisenhof, called "balcony of Dresden", which provides gorgeous panoramic views of the city.

    In case you are a fan of old technologies - there is an opportunity to see the old engines at the top station. Ask the staff!

    The fare right now is 4 Euro for a round trip. Single far is 3 Euro. If you have a day ticket then you only pay the reduced fare (2.50/2 Euro). Weekly and monthly tickets cover the funicular rides.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Trains

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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Suspension railway

    by german_eagle Updated Nov 20, 2010

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    Top station of the suspension railway
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    Körnerplatz in Dresden-Loschwitz offers yet another option to go up on a hill: the suspension railway.

    It was built 1898 - 1901 and is one of the oldest in the world. Length is 281 m, elevation difference 84 m.

    From the upper station you can again enjoy fabulous views of the city. It is also the starting point of some nice hikes along the hills.

    The fare right now is 4 Euro for a round trip. Single far is 3 Euro. If you have a day ticket then you only pay the reduced fare (2.50/2 Euro). Weekly and monthly tickets cover the funicular rides.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Trains

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  • Antji's Profile Photo

    Take a cable railway for a great view over Dresden

    by Antji Written Nov 21, 2004

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    one of the cable railway stations

    Go over the Blaues Wunder (blue bridge) near the Körnerplatz and take one of the two cable railways. One cable railway goes to Weisser Hirsch, thats a part of Dresden, where you will find a lot of expensive villas from rich people and the other goes to a part of Dresden, where are a lot of Villas too but more from artists.
    From both places you will have a beautiful view over Dresden and you can walk around or eating in some great restaurants.

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  • Kakapo2's Profile Photo

    Day Pass for Getting around economically

    by Kakapo2 Written Aug 28, 2008

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    Tramway in Neustadt.

    I was delighted with the public transportation system in Dresden. They do not only have a great network of tramways and buses but also a ferry which takes you across the Elbe river – and all those means of transport are included in the day pass that we purchased.

    If you want to buy single tickets you are charged by the length of your journey (4 tariff zones from 1.50 to 6.80 Euro). Those get cheaper if you buy multi-trip tickets. A single trip on the ferry costs 0.90 Euro.

    Day passes cost 4.50 to 11 Euro – but if you are not travelling alone you should go for the “Familienpass” which is for two grown-ups and up to four children to the age of 14. This costs no more than 6 Euro for the city including the Elbe ferry, and 14 Euro for the whole region. For small groups up to 5 people 22 Euro.

    If you stay 3 days or longer the “Wochenkarte” (weekly ticket) at 13.50/17 Euro would be an option for you.

    Many more tariffs and zones etc. So talk to the people at the counter and they will tell you which is the most economical ticket for you. They do not try to sell you an expensive ticket that you would not need. You should just have an idea what your plans are, if you stay in the city or want to travel to areas further outside. There is a counter right inside the railway station, you cannot miss it.

    The word “Linienplan” on the transportation website stands for network, “Tarife” for, guess what, “Einzelfahrscheine” means single trips, “Tages- und Familienkarten” are the tariffs for all kinds of day passes. “Elbfähre” is the ferry.

    All tariffs as late August 2008.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Cycling in Dresden

    by Nemorino Written Dec 16, 2008

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    1. Cyclist going past the Semper Opera House
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    Of course most cyclists in Dresden are not dependent on bike-sharing systems, because they have their own bikes.

    Like any other self-respecting German city, Dresden has an active chapter of the General German Bicycle Club (ADFC). The ADFC works with local politicians and city departments to improve bicycle routes, install more bicycle parking stands and open one-way streets to cyclists going the other direction. (I am proud to be a member of the ADFC, but of course in Frankfurt not Dresden.)

    Additional photos: More cyclists in Dresden.

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    stadtrundfahrt

    by lina112 Written Oct 24, 2006

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    bus

    10.30 am and we arrived to Dresden and we did have no idea how to move on Dresden and outside of the train station we found an stand with a nice woman with information of sightseeing tour and we booked a trip to know the city of Dresden. We walked to theaterplatz where we took the bus. It take about 90 minutes and you visit all the main buildings, churchs, museums and much more. There are few stop where you can hop off and hop on. The price is 18 euros and include audio guide in your language, discounts on museums and palaces.

    Llegamos a las 10.30 a Dresden y no teniamos ni idea de como movernos allí hasta que encontramos al salir de la estacion de tren a una señora con información sobre tours así que nos acercamos, compramos los billetes. Andamos hasta Theaterplatz donde cogimos el autobús. El tour tarda unos 90 minutos y visitas los principales edificios, iglesias, museos y mucho mas. Hay varias paradas donde te puedes bajar y luego subir. El billete cuesta 18 euros e incluye audioguía en tu idioma y descuentos en museos y palacios.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture

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  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Going to

    by lina112 Written Oct 24, 2006

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    Dresden train station

    We went to Dresden by train, is the best option if you do it from Prague. We took the first one in the morning at 7.15 am and we took the last one to back at 20.00. The trip takes about 3 hours, including the passport control on the german border. We enjoyed with the trip all time bording Moldav river and Elba river, the sight is very beautiful. The price is about 40 euros and it’s a return open ticket.

    Fuimos a Dresden en tren, es la major opción para viajar desde Praga. Cogimos el primer tren de la mañana a las 7.15 y a la vuelta cogimos el último a las 20.00. El viaje tarda unas 3 horas, incluyendo la parada en la frontera alemana para el control de pasaporte. El viaje fue muy gratificante y las vistas son preciosas, bordeando el rio Moldava y el rio Elba. El billete cuesta unos 40 euros y es de ida y vuelta abierta.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Trains
    • Historical Travel

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    How to drive along Dresden

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 14, 2011

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    By Lada around Dresden
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    Traffic in Dresden in comparison with traffic in Moscow is very simple and friendly. There are a lot of signs and you will easily find the way to the Zentrum and ways to autobahns. There are a plenty of convenient parkings and you will always find a spare place for your car. While driving along Dresden you will enjoy beautiful views out of windows.

    You can watch my 3 min 51 sec HD Video Along Dresden by car out of my Youtube channel.

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  • german_eagle's Profile Photo

    Paddle Steamers

    by german_eagle Updated Nov 20, 2010

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    The steamer
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    A very enjoyable way to get around Dresden is to do a trip by one of the old paddle steamers on the Elbe river.

    The central departure station is located right in front of Brühl's Terrace on the left bank of the river (old town) in the city centre. Another station is in Blasewitz at the restaurant Schillergarten. Boats run in both directions, up- and downstream. Upstream the ride goes as far as Bad Schandau in Saxon Switzerland, downstream beyond Meißen, as far as Diesbar-Seußlitz (vineyards!). There are also steamers that only run to Schloss Pillnitz and back, or that go to Pirna.

    Summer season with frequent connections starts early April and ends late Oct. Special events like steamer parade (May 1 and during City Festival/Stadtfest in August) and Riverboat Shuffle (during Jazz Festival in May) are always favourites of both locals and tourists. Reservations far in advance for these events are a must.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Family Travel
    • Cruise

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