Stolpen Off The Beaten Path

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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Stolpen

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    Lauterbach

    by german_eagle Updated May 5, 2012

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    Parish church Lauterbach
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    Lauterbach is a quaint village about 3 km away from Stolpen which belongs to the municipality. It is nothing particularly exciting, but a good example for a rural place in Saxony. Beautiful farmhouses, well taken care of, a goat ranch where you can buy goat products (organic), and a parish church.

    The church is small but beautiful. The eastern part (choir) is preserved from the 12th/13th century, the nave was reconstructed a couple of times in later centuries. The interior - all white - is from 1870: The wooden altar with columns and niche with a golden crucifixus, below a copper-plate depicting the Last Supper (the latter from 1670). The simple pulpit and balconies are also from 1870. The font is probably still a leftover from the Romanesque era.

    The church is usually open during daytime in summer. I visited too early in the year so had to look through the open window at the western facade.

    UPDATE: I visited Lauterbach again and found the church to be open. I think "summer" opening means May through September/October. The Romanesque font is in bad condition and put away behind the altar. There is a nice baptismal font from 1870, though. You're free to walk around, even go into the sacristy and up to the balcony. See my travelogue for pictures!

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    Parish church Stürza

    by german_eagle Written May 3, 2012

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    Parish church St��rza
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    The nearby village (about 5 km) has a very beautiful church, not to miss if you're in the area. The church is usually open during daytime in summer.

    The choir is late Gothic style, the nave is from the 17th century. The massive fortified tower is from 1630/31.

    The balconies have paintings, the lower ones depict scenes from the old testament (17th century), the upper ones have floral and ornamental decoration from the 18th century. Paintings from the 17th century were put together to an altar in classicistic frame. The wings depict scenes from the life of Jesus Christ, the predella has a Last Supper, the main painting depicts the crucifixion - a quite remarkable work.

    Also worth to note is the pulpit with pictures of the Evangelists (17th century). The chandeliers are made of Bohemian glass - excellent works. And if you're wondering where the funds came from - there's a patronage box on the southern side for the family that owned the manor in nearby Heeselicht ...

    The church once had an organ by the Herbrig's (1847) but it was replaced by a work of the Jehmlich organ builder from Dresden in 1933.

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    Altstadt

    by german_eagle Updated May 3, 2012

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    Parish church Stolpen-Altstadt
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    Below the actual town, close to the small Wesenitz river, is a district of Stolpen that is named "Altstadt" (old town). At first this sounds weird, one would assume that the picturesque town around the Market square *is* the old town. The reason is that originally the settlement (named Jockgrim back then) was founded down by the river, quite a distance from the castle. A century or so later the authorities thought it would be more convenient - and safer - to have a town right by the castle. So they founded what is nowadays the proper town, and really, it grew quite fast and the former settlement with name Jochgrimm was renamed "old town".

    Anyway, nowadays this is a cute village-like place with some beautiful, large farmhouses in typical local style (timber-framed and some even "Umgebinde" houses). They all assemble around the small parish church. The walls go back to the Romanesque era. The simple portal is Gothic style, the interior (after several re-designs) is from 1832. The altar with integrated pulpit - typical for Lutheran churches in Saxony - is from the late 18th century, a former - beautiful - altar painting is from 1664. There are two baptismal fonts in the church, one from 1832 and another one from 1570 that was found on nearby farmland (!) in the late 20th century.

    A remarkable piece is the organ by local Wilhelm Leberecht Herbrig from 1859. It's a very good work, only few of his organs are preserved. Watch out for concerts!

    Sometimes the doors are open during the day, if not, ask at the nearby carpenter workshop. The lady in the office will get Frau Löbel who lives in the house vis-a-vis. Frau Löbel will give you a detailed tour of the church. Plan for a half hour (or longer) :-)

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    "Käsemarkt" square

    by german_eagle Updated Mar 27, 2004

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    Fountain on the square

    Still outside the remains of the city wall and city gate you find this little square. It is surrounded by small old houses. A fountain with a sculpture of contemporary art decorates the square. In past centuries a cheese market was held there from time to time, therefore the name.

    A very quiet place, good for picnic or so.

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Stolpen Off The Beaten Path

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