Wurzen Travel Guide

  • Wurzen
    by german_eagle
  • Things to Do
    by german_eagle
  • Things to Do
    by german_eagle

Wurzen Things to Do

  • St. Wenceslai

    The main ev-Lutheran parish church of Wurzen is St. Wenceslai. It was first mentioned in 1275, the present building is from the 16th century and another reconstruction in the years 1663-73. The tall steeple is sort of a civil counterbalance to the cathedral's steeples in the cityscape.I couldn't see the interior, no regular opening hours. One has...

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  • Markt square

    The central place in town is the Markt square, slightly elevated in the northern part of the old town. The rectangular square was designed in the 12th century, most of the beautiful townhouses were built upon the medieval cellars, but date from the 19th century. However, some houses - with the most remarkable facades - were built in the 17th and...

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  • Museum

    The local museum is in one of the most beautiful houses of Wurzen, centrally in the old town. It has a very interesting exhibit on the history of the town and the region, on the craftsmen/economy, but also on daily life, high quality art pieces. There is of course an exhibit on the writer Joachim Ringelnatz.The house alone is worth seeing - the...

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  • Castle

    Bishop Johann VI von Saalhausen commmissioned the construction of the castle in Wurzen. It was built 1491 - 97 in late Gothic style. One year after the Bishop died, in 1519, a fire destroyed the third floor and the roof construction. Under his successor, Johann VII von Schleinitz, these parts were reconstructed between 1522 and 1525. Not much has...

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  • Cathedral - expressionist sculptures

    What blew me away in the cathedral were the altar, pulpit and other cast-bronze pieces in expressionist style by Georg Wrba (Professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Dresden) from 1931/32. You probably notice the pulpit first, it is right by the main entrance (pic 3). Seven pillars support the pulpit, for the heads of the apostles (pic 4) Wrba...

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  • Cathedral

    The cathedral is *the* highlight in Wurzen, it's actually one of the most impressive religious buildings in Saxony I have seen so far. The whole area around the cathedral, also called "cathedral district", has several significant buildings and leaves a lasting impression on the visitor, it is somewhat similar to the one in Meißen.The cathedral is a...

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Wurzen Restaurants

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    by german_eagle Updated Sep 23, 2013

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    Right at the corner Markt square/Wenceslaigasse/Domgasse, so really in the centre of everything, is this place. They call themselves a "Bistro", probably in the original meaning (Russian - "quick"). Do not expect any culinary highlights here, it's basic food, but filling and in okay quality. Self-service, you order and get the food inside, grab knife and fork etc. and off you go and look for a table. It's really inexpensive, the staff is friendly, and there are surprisingly many different dishes on the menu list (cardboard inside).

    I loved the location. You sit on an elevated sidewalk and have good view of the streets. Great for people watching. Breakfast and lunch available, snacks inbetween.

    Open Mon-Fri 7 - 17 h.

    Favorite Dish: I had Cordon bleu with potatoes and cauliflower - ok, but nothing to write home about. Gravy was ... hmm. The beer was a Krostitzer (regional) in a bottle. I paid 4.65 Euro for everything.

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Wurzen Transportation

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    by german_eagle Written Sep 23, 2013

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    The best option to get to Wurzen IMO is the train. The town is only a few km from Leipzig, and it is on the main railway route between Leipzig and Dresden. Fast trains (IC, ICE) do not stop in Wurzen, though, you must take the regional trains which run hourly.

    Wurzen is in the MDV public transportation network around Leipzig and Halle. Their fares apply if you start from somewhere in that MDV network. If you start from outside MDV, then fares of Deutsche Bahn apply. I traveled from Dresden, so I bought a (single) Sachsen-Ticket which was 22 Euro (in 2013). 3 Euro more for each additional traveler, up to five in total. Since August 2013 the MDV accepts the Sachsen Ticket for any travel in their network, on buses, trains, trams.

    The train station in Wurzen is only a 5 minutes walk from the old town, it's a pleasant walk through the former cemetery, now public park, and through Wenceslaigasse.

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Wurzen Shopping

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  • Chandeliers

    Looking for luxurious, opulent lamps? A chandelier for your salon at home? :-) Go to Wurzen and get one!I knew that the Leuchten Manufactur in Wurzen built the huge chandelier in the reconstructed Semperoper in Dresden in the 1980s, the story with all the hassle because of shortage of material was in every documentary on the reconstruction of that...

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  • Pastry/cookies outlet

    Wurzen is famous for its traditional pastry since 1847, since 2008 the local Dauerbackwaren GmbH belongs to Griesson - de Beukelaer. The new outlet store is located just a few steps north of the Markt square. The place is huge - about 600 sq.m. Mon - Fri 9.00 - 19.00 Sat from 9.00 - 14.00 They have all sorts of well-known brands of pastry,...

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Wurzen Local Customs

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    by german_eagle Written Sep 25, 2013

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    On 7 August 1883 Hans Gustav Bötticher was born in Wurzen, Crostigall 14, in an artsy family. His father was friends with Conrad Ferdinand Meyer, Theodor Fontane, Adolph von Menzel e.g. He first became a (lousy) sailor, but his life took a turn when he took a position in Munich's art pub "Simplicissimus" in 1909. He began working seriously as stand-up comedian and writer, later as painter, too. From 1919 on he used the pen-name "Joachim Ringelnatz".

    He became famous for his wry poems, often using word play and sometimes bordering on nonsense poetry (similar to Christian Morgenstern's, but often more satirical and/or occasionally subversive). His most popular figure is the anarchic sailor Kuttel Daddeldu with his drunken antics and disdain for authority.

    The Nazis banned him as a "degenerated artist" in 1933. He died of tuberculosis 7 November 1934 in Berlin.

    Wurzen has a Ringelnatz Trail with 13 stations, marked by steles (pics 1-3) with engraved poems by Ringelnatz. In German, of course. They are in places of interest, like the cathedral, Crostigall, his birthplace, Markt square etc. but take you to off the beaten path places like (former) Jacobstor, too. A flyer is available in the Tourist Info.

    Pics 4 and 5 show the house where he was born (Crostigall 14). A museum on him and his work used to be here, but it was closed some years ago and the exhibits were transferred to the town museum (see separate tip).

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Wurzen Off The Beaten Path

  • Mill company

    Southwest of the old town, close to the Mulde river, is the Wurzener pastry/food company that now belongs to Griesson - de Beukelaer (see shopping tip also). The company was founded in 1847 by Johann Friedrich Krietzsch, who bought the mill from the town administration. 1918 - 20 the new plant was erected by architect Max Fricke, the two huge...

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  • Crostigall

    The small alley that (roughly) leads from the main parish church St. Wenceslai in western direction (Leipzig) is one of the earliest settlements in Wurzen, first mentioned "in Crostigalo" in a document in 1340. The look of the alley and the townhouses has not changed much since about 1700 - mostly nicely restored, though.Interesting buildings are...

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  • Old Cemetery

    The first thing you see after leaving the train station is the former old cemetery from 1548, a public park since 1975.Pictures 1-3 show the monument for the more than 700 fallen soldiers from Wurzen in WWI, erected 1929/30. The sculptures, created by Georg Wrba, are under a wide pointed arch of stone. Pillars, with engraved names of the soldiers,...

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Wurzen Favorites

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    by german_eagle Written Sep 23, 2013

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    Favorite thing: Anywhere I go, I always try to catch a good view of the cityscape. Wurzen has a beautiful old town with some towers/church steeples, so it definitely has a beautiful cityscape - but the town is in a mostly flat region, so it is a tough call to find a good viewpoint.

    I happened to stumble upon a parking lot right next (east) to the town's main parish church St. Wenceslai ... usually I am NOT fond of parking lots, but in this case it turned out to be one of my favourites places in town. From the upper deck you have GREAT views of the old town. Wow!

    Pic 1 has the panoramic view: Main parish church left, then the tower of the mill, the two towers of the cathedral and the tower of the Bishop's castle.

    Pic 2 is a shot of the neighbouring main parish church.

    On pic 3 you can see that the mill actually has two towers.

    Pic 5 is the view of the parking lot.

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