Flensburg Travel Guide

  • Flensburg waterfront
    Flensburg waterfront
    by CatherineReichardt
  • Small Daughter reconfigures a Viking village
    Small Daughter reconfigures a Viking...
    by CatherineReichardt
  • Fjordside setting for the museum
    Fjordside setting for the museum
    by CatherineReichardt

Flensburg Things to Do

  • You're never too young to appreciate...

    During our visit to Flensburg, we selflessly undertook some quality control on the local Flensburger pilsener. We undertake this arduous research with no thought for our own personal enjoyment in the quest for our annual Beer of the Year - and we start our researchers young!

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  • Harbour

    Busy harbour is a good place to walk around and watch the boats, didn't stay too long ourselves, look at the photo, the next snow shower is coming!

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  • Shopping!

    Not a great favourite of mine, Mrs Bonio seems to enjoy though! Three streets, Norderstrasse, Grossestrasse and Holm stretch for around 1 Km, thats lots of shopping to do.

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  • H?fe

    There are many H?fe, old merchant courtyards, around Rote strasse and Holm. Interesting to wander in and look at the small shops there.

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  • See Nordertor

    Once the north gate to the city. Today it marks the end of the main shopping street, still looking good though.

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  • Rum Museum

    Museum showing the history of rum manufacture in Flensburg, a traditional industry in town. I'm partial to a drop of rum so found this to be interesting, and it was snowing outside.

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  • Schiffahrts Museum

    Museum showing the history of the port, local shipbuilding and merchant activities. Interesting displays and some very well made model ships. A good place to spend an hour on a snowy day, or any day really.

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  • Internet Cafe

    The most important thing for any Vt'er is to have access to a computer, so an internet cafe is a must....

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  • Schifffahrtsmuseum/ Maritime Museum

    Well, I've been to a number of maritime museums... and in a way they are all the same. They have some old paintings of old sailboats, they have little copies of huge tall ships, and they give you a nice idea of the city and its history. The museum in Flensburg is just like that, with some interesting exhibits of a rope maker's workshop, strange...

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Flensburg Hotels

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Flensburg Restaurants

  • Hansens Brauerei

    A night out at a brew pub always appeals to us. This one claims to be the most northerly brewpub in Germany.Good tasty food and beer in a busy bar, excellent. Look out for the daily specials on the menu.

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  • Viva

    Lunchtime, walking down Rote Strasse, and starting to snow heavily. This is the first place we see. A great choice fortunately. Menu is Mexican and also tapas. We decided to share a large plate of mixed vegetarian tapas, with some meatballs on the side for me. All very tasty and washed down with a couple of local Flensburger beers. Very good food...

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  • Mexican Food

    This place has great tapas and other mexican food... I had a really good meal here before heading off for a night out on the town.... Tapas

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Flensburg Nightlife

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    Irish bar

    by Jasen71 Written Jan 28, 2006

    This irish is irish only in name, but the bar is buzzing and the karaoke is funny. The bar staff did pull a opint of the black stuff in under a minute, so nil points for guinness serving... i was to drunk to take a photo that night, but i went back the next day...

    Dress Code: None

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

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Flensburg Transportation

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    by Obak81 Written Dec 3, 2006

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    The main trainstation in Flensburg is located in the middel of the city.
    There are connections to Kiel, Neumünster and Hamburg on the German side, and the station is serviced by the Hamburg-Aarhus train going northwards into denmark. Furthermore some regional danish trains (operated by DSB) also stop in Flensburg.

    The station is located at: Zur Bleiche 51.

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    • Trains

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Flensburg Shopping

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    by Obak81 Written Dec 2, 2006

    This Shopping Center is 47.000 square meters, and has 2400 free of charge parking lots.
    The center consists of several food/drinks stores, a building material store and several shops with shoes and clothes. Beside this there are some food vendors (a grillbar, and a chinese restaurant).

    What to buy: For a Dane there are a lot of favorable prices on alcohol, soda, and shoes (among others).

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Flensburg Local Customs

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    Christmas market

    by IceBear7 Updated Dec 20, 2004

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    Flensburg does not have the most beautiful Christmas market in the world - basically they have booths along the main shopping street.

    BUT they sell some unique drinks there, called Punsch. It's like any other Glühwein you get in Germany, but you can add some more rum, and you can add raisins, special sugar and other spices, just to your taste.

    Many of the booths also have a wide selection of hot chocolate with a shot of rum or other stuff.

    And to eat, you should try Grünkohl and Grünkohl soup. It's a very health winter vegetable, doesn't look very nice but the taste is great. Typical food for the north of Germany.

    Das Auge isst nicht mit, aber das Ohr trinkt mit! (sorry, untranslateable!)

    Some of the backyards have great little christmas markets as well, especially around the Rote Straße.

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting
    • Food and Dining
    • Arts and Culture

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Flensburg Warnings and Dangers

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    by CatherineReichardt Written Oct 17, 2011

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    Visiting churches is one of the absolute highlights of a trip to Europe, and provides a fascinating insight into the most powerful influencethat has shaped European cultures of the past couple of millenia.

    Unlike some other religions - where access to places of worship may be restricted to members of that religious group or a specific gender - the vast majority of Christian churches will allow tourists to visit at most times, including routine services (although some may charge an admission fee for doing so, and access may be denied for private events such as weddings and funerals). However, tourists should realise that most churches are still active places of worship, and so visitors need to exhibit a certain sensitivity to display respect to the culture and avoid giving offence to people at prayer.

    The following guidelines are based on wonderful advice offered by Homer (homaned) - who does this for a living - in a forum response, and although specifically written for Christian places of worship, would apply equally to places of worship for other religions

    So, here is a general list of do's and don'ts for people wishing to photograph during a church service:

    READ THE SIGNS
    If photography is not permitted - because, for example, it may damage paint on delicate murals - this will usually be indicated by a pictogram of a camera with a red line through it. Under most circumstances, you can assume that photography will be allowed (unless otherwise indicated), but may not be permitted during services. If in doubt, ask for clarification - this shows respect and will very seldom be met with anything other than a helpful response.

    TURN OFF YOUR FLASH!
    Every camera on the market has a button on it which will turn off the flash. The number one most alarming and distracting thing that can happen during a liturgy, and one which will even get you kicked out of some churches, is the bright flash that goes off when you take a picture. Not only is it distracting, but it usually makes the picture turn out dark, because your camera's flash only has about a 10-15' range. Turn off the flash, and hold the camera up against your eye, using the viewfinder, and you will likely get a better picture (and you definitely won't have any red-eye problems!).

    DON'T MOVE AROUND ALL OVER THE PLACE! (UNLESS YOU HAVE PERMISSION)
    Instead of walking all over down the main aisle and in front of everybody, pick a good place from which to take a picture at the beginning of the liturgy, and stay there. Unless you're a professional photographer with practice at stealthily moving during liturgies, you're a distraction, and you're being disrespectful. Even if you're a pro, try to stick to one out-of-the-way place, and use a zoom lens and zoom in to get pictures. Walking in front of people is a surefire way to distract and disrespect and closing in on priests or other celebrants just to capitalise on a photo opportunity is offensive.

    TURN OFF THE CAMERA'S SOUND!
    Every camera has some way to mute all its 'cute' beeps and clicking noises. If you press a button, and hear a beep, or if you take a picture and hear an obnoxious shutter clicking sound, you need to turn off those sounds (the muting option is usually in one of the menus). Along with the flashing, it's an obvious sign that someone is taking pictures and not showing much respect for those trying to pay attention to the liturgy.

    TURN OFF THE 'FOCUS ASSIST' LIGHT!
    If your camera can't focus without the little laser-light that shines in everyone's eyes before your camera takes a picture, then don't use your camera. You have to turn that light off! It is very distracting to be watching a lector or priest, and see a little red dot or lines pop up on his face all of the sudden. It's as if some rifleman is making his mark! Turn the light off (again, look in the menus for the option to turn off the 'AF assist' or 'focus assist' light). If you can't turn it off, put a piece of duct tape or some other opaque material over the area where the light is, so the light won't shine on someone.

    TURN OFF THE CAMERA'S LCD!
    You should never use the LCD to compose your shots anyways; just put your eye up to the viewfinder, and that will not only not distract, it will also steady your camera against your face, making for a better picture (especially if you don't have the flash on). And if you must review the pictures you've taken, hold the camera in front of you, down low, so people behind you don't notice the big, bright LCD display on your camera

    CERTAIN PARTS OF THE CEREMONY ARE PARTICULARLY SENSITIVE
    The consecration (blessing) of the eucharist (bread and wine) and distribution of communion to the congregation are considered to be particularly sacred parts of the service, and it is offensive to photograph these activities.

    The main thing is to try to be respectful of the culture and of other people present at the service. Don't distract. And, if you are asked to not take pictures, or if there's a sign saying 'no photography allowed,' then don't take pictures. You can always ask a priest's permission before the liturgy, but if he says 'No,' put away your camera and enjoy the freedom you have to focus on the privilege of being able to share an experience with people who consider these religious rituals core to their culture and identity, rather than focusing on your camera's LCD!

    Homer's Rules ... Homer rules!

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Flensburg Off The Beaten Path

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    Reconstuction of a Viking longboat 2 more images

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Jun 21, 2011

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    Wikinger Museum Haithabu is located on the site of the ancient Viking settlement of Hathaby. It was once the largest Viking city in the world, but was sacked by the Slavs in 1066 (which seems poetic justice given the amount of raiding they carried out on other people's settlements), after which the settlement was moved across the river to the site of modern Schleswig.

    The town occupied a beautiful and commanding position at the head of a long fjord which cuts into the Jutland peninsula. From here, it was 'only' a matter of 15km porterage to reach the North Sea on the other side of the peninsula, which removed the need to negotiate the treacherous waters of the Skagerrak and Kattegat straits - I say 'only', because 15km still seems like a good long way to trot bearing a longboat on your shoulders!

    I was very excited at the prospect of this museum, as, despite the enormous influence that they wielded over Northern Europe in the Dark Ages, there aren't too many places where you can learn more about Viking culture. The high point is a reconstructed longboat which is extremely impressive, but I confess that I found many of the other exhibits to be a little dry. Maybe I expected too much, but I emerged feeling slightly disappointed with a sense that the museum didn't do full justice to the fascinating subject matter.

    On further consideration, I think that the museum tries too hard to debunk the impression that the Vikings spent all their time raping and pillaging, and overemphasises the agricultural and trading aspects of the culture. Their more peaceable activities - particularly the extent of their trade - are indeed fascinating, but (at least to my mind) the way that the material is presented is too academic, and the displays could do with being punchier and more concise. I would imagine that children would be particularly interested in knowing more about the Viking way of life, but apart from an excellent exhibit which encourages kids to assemble their own Viking village from blocks, there is relatively little to engage them.

    Despite this quibble, it is an interesting museum, and well worth going to see the longboat alone. Another major plus is the lovely fjordside setting, where you could linger for hours in good weather (especially if you were organised enough to bring a picnic with you) and the stupendous architecture of the museum building, which is forged out of sheet metal and looks like the upturned hulls of longboats. It is wonderful to see the architecture of a building reflect its function, and this will probably be the memory of Haithabu that I remember most fondly.

    To get there by car, take motorway A7 Hamburg-Flensburg, exit Schleswig/Jagel. The museum is located on the B 76 south of Schleswig.

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Flensburg Sports & Outdoors

  • SG Flensburg-Handewitt

    SG Flensburg-Handewitt is a team handball club, and they compete in the German First League of Handball. They won the national championship in 2004 and have also won the EHF Cup and the EHF Cup Winner’s Cup. SG Flensburg-Handewitt was established in 1990 when TSB Flensburg merged with Handewitter SV. They play their home games at Campushalle with...

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  • Handball

    There are not many places in Germany where football/ soccer is not the number 1 sport - but Flensburg is one of them. Handball is all that matters up here. Maybe because they do not have a very successfull soccer team. Their team, SG Flensburg-Handewitt, is famous, very popular, and very successful these days. According to my brother seeing one of...

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  • Flensburg Hotels

    33 Hotels in Flensburg

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Flensburg Favorites

  • The Captain's Walk

    A very special city tour - tracing the steps of the old captains returning form a trip to the caribbean and runnng their errands at home in Flensburg before going on their next journey. Throughout the city important 14 landmarks - important for the 17 century captain Käptn Petersen- are linked and described in a little booklet, and walking this...

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  • Glücksburg

    The castle of Glückburg is only a few kilometers away from Flensburg. It looks beautiful in pictures and guide books, photo taken in bright sunshine of course. It looked a little sad in the beginning of December, so I have to come back in summer to write a proper tip. Huge lake and park around the castle, and you can go inside in summer.Aparently,...

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  • Harbour

    I just love cities built by the water, and Flensburg has its water right in its heart. It's called the Förde and is something like a natural canal running for a few miles to the Baltic Sea. There are no big ships in the city center harbour area, just some old museum ships (like the Marie in the picture), small yachts, rowing boats and some boats...

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Explore Deeper into Flensburg
East Side
Restaurants
Rote Straße
Things to Do
Rum Museum
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Museumsberg
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The Heiliggeist Church
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The Market Hall (Schrangen)
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Walking in the pedestrian zone
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Walking in the pedestrian zone
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The Company Gate
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Schiffahrtsmuseum
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Act like a fool at the border!
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Map of Flensburg

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