Friedrichsruh Travel Guide

  • Bismarck - Foundation, Friedrichsruh
    Bismarck - Foundation, Friedrichsruh
    by Airpunk
  • Proclamation of the German Empire (Painting)
    Proclamation of the German Empire...
    by Airpunk
  • Bismarck - Foundation, Friedrichsruh
    Bismarck - Foundation, Friedrichsruh
    by Airpunk

Friedrichsruh Things to Do

  • Airpunk's Profile Photo
    Chapel (Bismarck - Mausoleum)

    by Airpunk Written Jun 1, 2012

    The iron Chancellor, Germany's strong figure of the 19th century, is buried in a chapel built in his honour one year after his death. The sarcophagi of Bismarck and his wife were placed in the upper part of the chapel, while the lower part contains the vault of the Bismarck family. Probably the most notable detail is the inscription on Bismarck's sarcophagus. It says “A loyal German servant to Emperor Wilhelm I:” (Ein treuer deutscher Diener Kaiser Wilhelms I.). Even in his Death, Bismarck remarks that he appreciated Wilhelm I. But with this, he also says that his relationship with Wilhelm II. was not as good. The Bismarck family did not appear at any of the official ceremonies. It is still not uncommon to find fresh flowers from organisations and individual admirers at the grave. Please note that photography is not permitted within the chapel. Some basic Bismarck info can be found on my Friedrichsruh intro page.
    The chapel is located south of the railway line, close to the platform for the trains going to Büchen. It is located on private grounds which are accessible through a turnstile. There is a card needed to unlock the turnstile which is available at the Bismarck-Museum (2 EUR as of 2012, not available at the Foundation building!) or at the Butterfly Zoo.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Airpunk's Profile Photo
    Reconstruction of Bismarck's office 4 more images

    by Airpunk Written Jun 1, 2012

    The Bismarck-Museum is run by the Bismarck-Foundation (Otto-von-Bismarck-Stiftung) which has its seat in the former Friedrichsruh train station building, just a short walk away. Contrary to the exhibition in the foundation building, this exhibition focuses on original items of Bismarck's life and although there is explanatory text it is not as rich and extensive as in the other exhibition. Among the highlights is the only surviving (of three) copies of Anton von Werner's “Proclamation of Wilhelm I:”, the famous painting which shows the foundation of the German Empire. Other exhibits include Bismarck's famous uniform, his honours and medals received and several paintings showing contemporary monarchs such as Queen Victoria or the Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph. Probably the most interesting picture is the one of Wilhelm II. which Bismarck received from the German Emperor for his retirement. I don't think that Bismarck appreciated the painting from the man who forced him out of office very much.
    The entry fee is 4 EUR (as of 2012), 3 EUR for concessions. If you want to visit the chapel with the Bismarck-Mausoleum, you have to buy the tickets for it here as well (2 EUR) as there is no working ticket office at the chapel. Some basic Bismarck info can be found on my Friedrichsruh intro page.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Airpunk's Profile Photo
    Bismarck - Foundation, Friedrichsruh 4 more images

    by Airpunk Written Jun 1, 2012

    The Bismarck Foundation (Otto-von-Bismarck-Stiftung) is one of five foundations of the Federal Republic of Germany with the aim of preserving the memory of important German politicians presenting a historically critical view of their lives. The Bismarck Foundation is the youngest of the currently five, the others represent the life and deeds of Konrad Adenauer, Friedrich Ebert, Theodor Heuss and Willy Brandt. Its seat is the former train station building of Friedrichsruh which was refurbished in the 1990s after years of decay.
    In the ground floor, there is the interesting exhibition “Bismarck und seine Zeit” (Bismarck and his time which describes Germany's way from the post-napoleonic chaos of small kingdoms and dukedoms to the unification into one German state in 1871. With Bismarck being the driving force behind this process, the exhibition is linked to Bismarck's life. It is interesting to see that his militant attitude against France are mentioned as well as Bavaria's and Austria's antipathy against the dominance of Bismarck's Prussia. But probably one of Bismarck's greatest enemies was the German Emperor Wilhelm II. While Bismarck worked out the unification of Germany with Wilhelm's grandfather Wilhelm I., the young emperor felt to be patronized by the old chancellor and quickly forced Bismarck into retirement. Wilhelm II. destroyed Bismarck's system of European alliances and forced Germany into isolation which led the country into WWI.
    Even if the exhibition does not contain as many original items as the exhibition in the nearby Bismarck-Museum does, I consider this to be the better exhibition with a good mixture of pictures and text. Probably the only drawback is for our foreign visitors as all texts are presented in German. Staff is helpful, English-Speaking and will surely help you if you have any questions.
    As of 2012, the exhibition is for free and takes around an hour to see. A donation of 1 EUR/visitor is suggested, but not mandatory. On the first floor, there is an exhibition space which often contains art exhibition from lesser known local artists. Some basic Bismarck info can be found on my Friedrichsruh intro page.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

Friedrichsruh Transportation

  • Airpunk's Profile Photo
    A rare sight at Friedrichsruh: A stopping train!

    by Airpunk Written Jun 1, 2012

    Friedrichsruh has its own train station on the Aumühle-Büchen - line, however it is not really well served. There is roughly one train every two hours in each direction and it should be noticed that the schedule on weekends differs from the one on labour days. Furthermore, this line does not serve Hamburg at all so that you have always to change trains at Aumühle.
    If weather permits and you like walking, getting off at Aumühle and walking from there is a better option. S21 suburban railway (S-Bahn) trains run every twenty minutes from Hamburg's city centre (including Hauptbahnhof and Dammtor stations) to Aumühle. In the station building of Aumühle, take the exit to the right where there is a small italian restaurant and signs to a traditional German guesthouse on the other side of the road. Follow the signs to the guesthouse until you see signs for the Butterfly zoo and the Bismarck-Museum to the right. Follow the signs and you should be there in around fifteen minutes. You can use the railway line to your right as an orientation help as it will be always visible during your walk.
    Both Aumühle and Friedrichsruh are located in the “Ring C” zone of Hamburg's public transport system. Please make sure that you have the right ticket as typical Hamburg tickets are only for zone A and B (together called Großbereich Hamburg). Check the page of the German railways company "Die Bahn" or Hamburg's local transport association "HVV" for timetables.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Friedrichsruh

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

85 travelers online now

Comments

Friedrichsruh Travel Guide
Map of Friedrichsruh

View all Friedrichsruh hotels