Lübeck Things to Do

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    by trvlrtom
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    Cycling tours
    by MD2nd
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    by MD2nd

Most Recent Things to Do in Lübeck

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    Das Burgtor

    by der_geograf Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Das Burgtor, L��beck

    Das Burgtor was built in 1444, and is located on the north side of the Altstadt.

    I could not go inside because I was there early on a Sunday and the building was closed, but I did walk around and under it! (Ah! An excuse to go back to Lübeck!)

    The Burgtor is attached to the Altstadt wall, and there is a small parklike area around it, that makes for a nice walk. There are also also restaurants and small shops all along Große Burgstrasse, which leads up to the Burgtor.

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    Cycling tours

    by MD2nd Updated Oct 27, 2010

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    Cycling tours
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    Quoting from a page I find quite interesting to read regarding cycling the Baltic. "The Germans call this body of water the Ostsee but in English we know it as the Baltic Sea. Maxa and I split this tour into two parts, Flensburg to Luebeck and Luebeck to Ahlbeck on Usedom.." http://bicyclegermany.com/baltic_coast.htm

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    The Queen Of The Hanse - guided tours

    by MD2nd Written Oct 27, 2010

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    Luebeck, pedestrian zone
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    Luebeck is a district-free city in the state Schleswig-Holstein with a population of around 214.000. It is the second biggest city in that state, which lies in North Germany. The city is positioned at the Trave river with the largest German port on the Baltic Sea. The old part of the town is an islet which is enclosed by the Trave river.

    Luebeck has a medieval environment and many sites of cultural and historical interest. For example, because of its Brick Gothic architectural heritage, this city is on UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites.

    Visitors will certainly feel a sense of delight while visiting the Holsten Gate (Holstentor), which is a colossal, 15th-century fortification. Its twin towers are certainly its illustrious landmark, and one will find its picture on most post cards.

    http://www.mygermancity.com/luebeck

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    St Marien's Church

    by Turska Written Aug 22, 2010
    Wooden crosses
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    This church just happened to be on our route, when we walked around the city.
    When we walked inside, I noticed it was the same chuch I had seen at VT-pages with fallen bells. I think the wooden crosses inside the chuch were somehow beautyful. I noticed, that I was the only one taking photos of them, so maybe other people didn´t see the beauty of them. I don´t know the story behing them, didn´t find any info.

    And since I didn´t have a guidebook, I don´t know why the horns at little devils head outside are shiny? Does it bring you good luck to touch them? It was little strange to see a little devil close to the walls of church. I couldn´t think in Finland religious people would like that. But it was cute-looking statue :)
    I don´t put the photos of the fallen bells and the astrological clock, because anyone else has them allready ;)

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  • trvlrtom's Profile Photo

    The Holsten Gate (Holstentor)

    by trvlrtom Written Oct 3, 2009

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    This city landmark is a well known gate that marks the western boundary of the old center of of Lübeck. It a lasting part of Lübeck’s medieval fortifications and the last surviving city gate, and quite impressive for it's bulk. It has a unique pair of round towers large archway entrance are seen as the city symbol. The red brick construction material is common in the area, but the black tiles stand out. The gate and the old city center (Altstadt) of Lübeck are a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

    The black tile stripes that go around the gate have different designs. You will see lilies, a lattice pattern, or a representation of thistle leaves. There's the Lübeck heraldic eagle and a tree, and two men holding a coat of arms. Above the archway entrance there are works inscribed that read “concordia domi foris pax” (“harmony within, peace without”). This inscription dates from 1871 and is a shorter version of an earlier inscription that read "Concordia domi et pax foris sane res est omnium pulcherrima”

    When you go toward the old city you can't miss the gate. There is a long grass lawn leading up to it, which is a popular place to hang out or take photos. Just on the other side of the gate there are classic views of the waterway, where you can see the old buildings and church tower skyline. It makes a very impressive entrance to this beautiful city.

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    Lübeck Town Hall and Market Square

    by trvlrtom Written Sep 6, 2009

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    In the center of the Old Town is the wonderful Market, and along one side the Town Hall (Rathaus). The Rathaus is one of the most magnificent in Germany, built in the 13th-15th centuries in dark glazed brick, with a later addition dating to 1570 at the front of the building. The market square is a good place to buy some things for a picnic, or to have a seat at a cafe and enjoy the views and the local action. Niederegger has a cafe here, where you can get tasty bakery treats and coffee. We were here in the summer, but heard that this market is popular before Christmas, when booths and activities draw in a lot of tourists.

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    House of the Captains' Brotherhood (Guild)

    by trvlrtom Written Sep 2, 2009

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    This is one of the most beautiful and well preserved medieval buildings in the area. First there is the red brick exterior, with its notable "stair step" facade and rococo entrance that stand out from the street, and then there is the dark wood interior with many model ships and seafaring artifacts. Seeing both can bring you about as close as possible to the historic days of the Hanseatic League. Going inside the building is like taking a step back in time.
    The guild, or brotherhood, that built this house dates back to 1401, and they've held this property since 1535. The organization still exists, even though the economy has evolved tremendously since the days when the Hanseatic League was a dominant power in the region.
    Inside you will see that the tables are divided by low walls. In the old days they were assigned according to various harbors that the merchant ships sailed to and to the corporations that the skippers served. Now locals and tourists are welcome to join at the long tables and socialize, eat and drink together.

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  • trvlrtom's Profile Photo

    The Salzspeicher (salt storehouses)

    by trvlrtom Written Aug 16, 2009

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    Right next to the Holstentor along the Upper Trave River you will see six historic brick buildings called the Salzspeicher of Lübeck. These brick buildings were constructed from the 16th–18th centuries and were used to store salt that was mined near Lüneburg and brought to Lübeck over the Stecknitz Canal to then be shipped throughout the Baltic region. In the days before refrigeration salt was quite valuable and in high demand for preserving of food. The salt trade was essential for the growth and importance of Lübeck and other cities in the Hanseatic League.
    Over decades and centuries the buildings were used for different purposes, such as storing grain, textiles or lumber. Today, or at least last month when I was there, it is a women's clothing store, quite popular with my wife and others I was traveling with, allowing me plenty of free time to wander around the area and take photos of these buildings, the waterway and other nearby sites.
    I didn't know it at the time, but later found out that some of these buildings were used as the home of Count Orlok in the classic horror movie Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens. I saw that movie many years ago, but the stark and creepy images are still in my mind. I'll have to rent it.

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    St. Jakobi church

    by trvlrtom Written Aug 15, 2009

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    St. Jakobi interior
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    Lubeck's church towers are a landmark by themselves in this city. The spires of St. Jakobi church add to the charming skyline, and the church itself is worth a visit for several reasons.
    The church was built around 1300, and since the middle ages it has been the church of the seamen. In one of the chapels there is a life boat of the Pamir, a sailing ship that sank 1957 with only six surviving seamen of 86 total. This chapel is national and International Seafaring Memorial.
    The steeples are also quite unique, a blend of two different styles - a high Gothic roof with a baroque base. There was discussion and disagreement about the style of the steeple when it was being rebuilt during the 17th century, so a compromise was met.
    This church suffered relatively little damage during the world war II. The two 15th century organs are intact, and there are often organ recitals here as well as regular music during services. The altar dates from 1717, and the bronze font from 1466. Colorful paintings are also prominent inside the church, and there is a beautiful clock (seen in the 1st photo).

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    Marienkirche bells

    by trvlrtom Written Aug 15, 2009

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    church bells.

    During night of Palm Sunday from the 28th to March 29 1942, much of Marienkirchethe church was burnt out during an Allied bombing raid. One victim of the intense blasts and heat from the incendiary bombs was the church bells, which crashed down to the floor. When the church was rebuilt beginning in 1947 the bells were left as they had fallen, cracked and partially melted - a memorial to the tragedy of the times.

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    Marienkirche frescos and paintings - scandal

    by trvlrtom Written Aug 15, 2009

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    restored medieval painting in Marienkirche

    An interesting story is of the medieval decorative paintings, their rediscovery during World War Two and the scandal surrounding the restoration. The bombings of 1942 broke off large sections of plaster from the walls and ceiling, and medieval decorative paintings were revealed for the first time to modern eyes.
    The restoration of the gothic frescos resulted in one of the biggest postwar art scandals. A man named Dietrich Fey and a local painter named Lothar Malskat used photographs taken after the bombing to restore and recreate original works. Apparently Fey had Malskat invent one painting because there was no record to refer to. One area was simply made up in style of the 1300s of the others that had been photographed. Even though the fabricated paintings make up only a small part of the church’s many paintings, it caused quite an uproar and they were removed.
    This history doesn't distract, however, from the beautiful, colorful paintings that visitors can now see inside the church.

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    St. Marien

    by trvlrtom Updated Aug 15, 2009

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    St. Marien L��beck
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    St. Marien church is one of the city's most recognizable and notable landmarks. This soaring Gothic church was constructed between 1250 and 1350 and for many generations was a symbol of the power and prosperity of the old Hanseatic city. It is still the tallest building of the old town of Lübeck (larger than Lübeck Cathedral). The church and old town has been listed by UNESCO as of cultural significance.
    The building style is the rather common brick Gothic style of northern Germany, which is seen throughout the Baltic Area. This church has the church has the highest brick vault in the world; both towers are over 400 feet high, almost 125 meters. It was severely damaged by Allied bombing in March, 1942 and rebuilt over 12 years after 1947.
    Inside the church there are several unique things to see: the astronomical clock and the 14 broken crosses by Gunther Uecker. (2nd and 3rd photos.

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    Boat trip round the city

    by MikeBird Updated Jul 14, 2009

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    Boat tours from the river front

    Inevitably there are boats that take visitors on scenic tours along the waterways of major towns. Lübeck has several boat companies and we chose one from a central location quite near to the Holstentor.

    The trip lasted about 1 hour and it took us up and down river. There was a bar on board and a pleasant atmosphere. Boat trips have become a 'must do' for our family and we always enjoy them - perhaps the enforced slow pace is what we like. If the weather is kind there are few more pleasant things to do than watch the town landscape unfold at a slow steady pace. Try it.

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    St Marien's Church - the Astronomical Clock

    by MikeBird Updated Oct 5, 2008

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    The Astronomical Clock

    Amongst the many interesting features of this enormous and heavily restored church is this fascinating clock. It provides astronomical data - timing of new moons etc and is a splendid piece of craftsmanship. My guidebook says this replica replaces the original from 1565. Apparently at noon each day black, white and yellow people pass before Jesus - pity I was there in the afternoon I'd liked to have seen that!

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    Luebecker Dom

    by Rupanworld Written Jan 8, 2008

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    The Dom or Cathedral of Luebeck is something that I did not see. I should rather say, I missed it, because my homework was not proper and I could not trace out the route to it. Nevertheless, on return back to home I realised that and started checking on the internet. There I learnt a lot about it and saw photos as well. Surprisingly as I was going through photos taken by me, I came across 3 photos of the Dom as well. No wonder, they were amongst the photos that I had taken from the view platform at the St. Petri Kirche. That really made me so happy. But I would really urge upon future travellers to see the Dom as well.

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