Neu Travemünde Travel Guide

  • A seaside town made for genteel promenading
    A seaside town made for genteel...
    by CatherineReichardt
  • The land train
    The land train
    by MikeBird
  • The Vikings are coming!
    The Vikings are coming!
    by MikeBird

Neu Travemünde Things to Do

  • The boardwalk

    Boardwalk – see and be seen. The boardwalk of Travemuende was built in the years 1898/1899 in order to attract additional international guests. At the same time it was supposed to protect the newly built mansions in times of flooding. Thus a 1.7 km long walkway was erected which today gives visitors an excellent view of the bay, and the Priwall...

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  • Fishermen's harbor

    Experience the maritime atmosphere in Travemuende's fishermen’s harbor. Buy fresh fish on board of the fishing boats as well as tasty Fischbroetchen, the Nordic fish sandwich. Then take a break and relax while enjoying the original charm of this little harbor.luebeckongress.de/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=400&Itemid=495&lang=en

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  • Travemuende Week

    It started as a bet for some bottles of Luebeck’s Rotspon wine in 1888. Since then Travemuende Week has developed to become one of the greatest sailing events worldwide. More than 3,000 sailors from 20 different nations take part in the sporting event in Travemuende.. Last year almost one million visitors came to Travemuende Beach to enjoy both the...

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  • Enjoy the sunshine on the beach

    Travemunde has a fine stretch of sandy beach with a very smart promenade behind it. There are showers on the beach and the regulars, or the better organised, can hire the use of wicker beach chairs - all of which face the sun.We swam out to the diving platform and used the slide to launch myself back into the water.A noticeboard told us the air...

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  • The Passat

    It's the last German windjammer.This 4-masted barque,completed in 1911,sailed Cape Horn more than 30 times and circumnavigated the globe 2 times.The Passat is anchored in Travemunde port since 1960 and it has become one of the most famous Travemunde symbols.This ship is also become an hostel.Summer opening hours: daily 10-17

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  • Vorderrehei: a walk along the Trave...

    There is nothing particular to see really...but it's very pleasant to walk along the Trave river(the moth of this river is the port),in the Vorderrehei,the main street.There are many shops,stalls,bars,restaurants...and people!But pay attention to the bycicles!

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  • Walk on the strand ...

    Walking on the boardwalk at Travem?nde is a delightful way to spend some time. Here you can see the lone modern tower that existed back when I visited. I am sure there are more now:(

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  • A walk on the strand ... II

    The daily promenade on the strand is one of the most enjoyable activities in Travemünde. It helps you work off all that FOOD:)

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  • Sandcastle World

    Held here in 2002. I'm not sure if it is here every year but it is a thing to see in person if you can track it down.

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Neu Travemünde Hotels

Neu Travemünde Transportation

  • Maria250's Profile Photo

    by Maria250 Updated Aug 27, 2011

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    The Stadtverkehr Luebeck GmbH operates the local public transport in Luebeck and the surounding as well as the Priwall ferry. Visitors can get information about time-tables, tickets and fares on www.stadtverkehr-luebeck.de or call 01149-451-8 88 28 28. It's about a 15mns drive between Travemuende, Timmendorfer Strand or Luebeck. You may take a look at Hunter V's Luebeck page and MikeBird's Luebeck page.

    Fremdenverkehrsamt Travemuende
    Bertlingstrasse 21
    Travemuende, 23669
    email: info@travemuende-tourismus.de

    Travemuende Timmendorfer Strand Timmendorfer Strand source: www.stadtverkehr-luebeck.de
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Trains
    • Spa and Resort

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Neu Travemünde Local Customs

  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Sep 5, 2011

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    When I first heard of Strandkorbe (literally translated as 'beach baskets'), I thought optimistically about picnics and never for a moment imagined that you were meant to sit in one! And once I finally met one, I fell irrevocably in love!

    Strandkorb design must be one of the ultimate expressions of German pragmatism. The chair protects you from the sand, the sun and (more importantly) from the prevailing wind, and can also feature extra props such as fold out tables and underleg storage baskets - in short, everything you could need to be weatherproofed and self sufficient for your day on the beach!

    I also love their jolly, brightly coloured stripey canvas, and can't see why every nation bordering the Baltic and the North Sea hasn't adopted them!

    (P.S. I have to confess that the photos are a bit of a fraud, as they were taken outside the tourist information office in nearby Lubeck - miles away from the beach!)

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Neu Travemünde Warnings and Dangers

  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    by CatherineReichardt Written Oct 17, 2011

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    Visiting churches is one of the absolute highlights of a trip to Europe, and provides a fascinating insight into the most powerful influencethat has shaped European cultures of the past couple of millenia.

    Unlike some other religions - where access to places of worship may be restricted to members of that religious group or a specific gender - the vast majority of Christian churches will allow tourists to visit at most times, including routine services (although some may charge an admission fee for doing so, and access may be denied for private events such as weddings and funerals). However, tourists should realise that most churches are still active places of worship, and so visitors need to exhibit a certain sensitivity to display respect to the culture and avoid giving offence to people at prayer.

    The following guidelines are based on wonderful advice offered by Homer (homaned) - who does this for a living - in a forum response, and although specifically written for Christian places of worship, would apply equally to places of worship for other religions

    So, here is a general list of do's and don'ts for people wishing to photograph during a church service:

    READ THE SIGNS
    If photography is not permitted - because, for example, it may damage paint on delicate murals - this will usually be indicated by a pictogram of a camera with a red line through it. Under most circumstances, you can assume that photography will be allowed (unless otherwise indicated), but may not be permitted during services. If in doubt, ask for clarification - this shows respect and will very seldom be met with anything other than a helpful response.

    TURN OFF YOUR FLASH!
    Every camera on the market has a button on it which will turn off the flash. The number one most alarming and distracting thing that can happen during a liturgy, and one which will even get you kicked out of some churches, is the bright flash that goes off when you take a picture. Not only is it distracting, but it usually makes the picture turn out dark, because your camera's flash only has about a 10-15' range. Turn off the flash, and hold the camera up against your eye, using the viewfinder, and you will likely get a better picture (and you definitely won't have any red-eye problems!).

    DON'T MOVE AROUND ALL OVER THE PLACE! (UNLESS YOU HAVE PERMISSION)
    Instead of walking all over down the main aisle and in front of everybody, pick a good place from which to take a picture at the beginning of the liturgy, and stay there. Unless you're a professional photographer with practice at stealthily moving during liturgies, you're a distraction, and you're being disrespectful. Even if you're a pro, try to stick to one out-of-the-way place, and use a zoom lens and zoom in to get pictures. Walking in front of people is a surefire way to distract and disrespect and closing in on priests or other celebrants just to capitalise on a photo opportunity is offensive.

    TURN OFF THE CAMERA'S SOUND!
    Every camera has some way to mute all its 'cute' beeps and clicking noises. If you press a button, and hear a beep, or if you take a picture and hear an obnoxious shutter clicking sound, you need to turn off those sounds (the muting option is usually in one of the menus). Along with the flashing, it's an obvious sign that someone is taking pictures and not showing much respect for those trying to pay attention to the liturgy.

    TURN OFF THE 'FOCUS ASSIST' LIGHT!
    If your camera can't focus without the little laser-light that shines in everyone's eyes before your camera takes a picture, then don't use your camera. You have to turn that light off! It is very distracting to be watching a lector or priest, and see a little red dot or lines pop up on his face all of the sudden. It's as if some rifleman is making his mark! Turn the light off (again, look in the menus for the option to turn off the 'AF assist' or 'focus assist' light). If you can't turn it off, put a piece of duct tape or some other opaque material over the area where the light is, so the light won't shine on someone.

    TURN OFF THE CAMERA'S LCD!
    You should never use the LCD to compose your shots anyways; just put your eye up to the viewfinder, and that will not only not distract, it will also steady your camera against your face, making for a better picture (especially if you don't have the flash on). And if you must review the pictures you've taken, hold the camera in front of you, down low, so people behind you don't notice the big, bright LCD display on your camera

    CERTAIN PARTS OF THE CEREMONY ARE PARTICULARLY SENSITIVE
    The consecration (blessing) of the eucharist (bread and wine) and distribution of communion to the congregation are considered to be particularly sacred parts of the service, and it is offensive to photograph these activities.

    The main thing is to try to be respectful of the culture and of other people present at the service. Don't distract. And, if you are asked to not take pictures, or if there's a sign saying 'no photography allowed,' then don't take pictures. You can always ask a priest's permission before the liturgy, but if he says 'No,' put away your camera and enjoy the freedom you have to focus on the privilege of being able to share an experience with people who consider these religious rituals core to their culture and identity, rather than focusing on your camera's LCD!

    Homer's Rules ... Homer rules!

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Neu Travemünde Off The Beaten Path

  • Maria250's Profile Photo

    by Maria250 Updated Jul 31, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just as Travemuende has inspired Thomas Mann’s imagination and creativity, the seaside resort with its beauty of nature will also inspire its guests.

    Fremdenverkehrsamt Travemuende
    Bertlingstrasse 21
    Travemuende, 23669
    email: info@travemuende-tourismus.de

    Travemuende Travemuende Travemuende Travemuende Travemuende
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Seniors
    • Family Travel

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Neu Travemünde Favorites

  • Citymap Travemuende and Luebeck

    If you need an online citymap, have a look ... -> here.

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  • Nice experience

    It has been a great experience to bathe in the Baltic sea: I'm from Puglia,Southern Italy,and I wasn't imagining to swim in the Baltic sea at the opposite part of Europe!

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  • An aerial view of the "strand" in...

    The Strandperle Hotel is the small orange roof on the beach, top and far right..I've found it listed on the web -- but no current pictures. The restaurant still seems to have a good reputation though..This is a postcard that I purchased on this trip. The big hotel is the "Four Seasons Casino" Hotel.

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