Statues / Monuments / Museums, Gibraltar

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    Archaeology (2)
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    Archaeology (3)
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  • DAO's Profile Photo

    THE REAL NELSON STATUE

    by DAO Written Dec 30, 2013

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    Lord Horatio Nelson Statue
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    Opposite the Trafalgar Cemetery is a statue of Lord Horatio Nelson. He famously defeated the combined Spanish and French fleets on October 21, 1805. He also famously died during the battle ("Kiss me Hardy"). Unlike any other statue of Nelson, he is life sized and you can stand right next to him. He is represented exactly as he was shortly before he was killed. Even the arm he had amputated at the Battle of of Santa Cruz de Tenerife on 25 July 1797. He was famous for that as well. He went 'back to work' 30 minutes after a surgeon cut it off.

    The statue was created by English sculptor John Doubleday. It was presented to the people of Gibralar by Peter Caruana, the Chief Minister of Gibraltar, to celebrate the 200th anniversary of Trafalgar on October 28, 2005.

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    The Gibraltar Museum

    by gordonilla Written Mar 2, 2013

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    Exterior (1)
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    This was a small but interesting Museum; and it seemed to be rather busy with visitors when I visited on the Saturday morning when I made my visit. There is a £2 admission charge and there is a small "shop" with a range of books and memorabilia.

    It provides an overview of the history of the Gibraltar - military, social and geological.

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    Cradle of History Monument

    by tim07 Updated Nov 19, 2011

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    The monument in the shape of the rock is one of the first things you see after crossing the airport runway into Gibraltar. It shows the various civilisations that have inhabited Gibraltar throughout history.

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    Cradle of History monument

    by HORSCHECK Updated Oct 10, 2011

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    Cradle of History monument

    The Cradle of History monument represents some periods of Gibraltar's ancient history. It shows the skull of a Neanderthal Man, which was found here.

    Apart from that the concrete monument includes one of the Pillars of Hercules and mentions of Phoenician, Roman and Moorish times, as well as an image of an anchor representing the Battle of Trafalgar.

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    Royal Memorial Plaque

    by Airpunk Written Jan 3, 2010
    The place where the Queen and once stood...
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    For those fans of Royalty who would like to enjoy the same view over Gibraltar as Queen Elizabeth once did, you’ll find a small viewpoint at Queens Road, close to the junction of this street and Cave Branch Road. OK, Gibraltar is not the same as it was in the 1950s, but at least it’s still British … The Queen’s visit on May 10th and 11th 1954 was by now the only one by the present Monarch and was done in a time when tensions with Spain arose again. For those who can’t get enough of royalty, have a look at Queen Elizabeth’s Royal Cypher in the Alameda Gardens.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Sikorski Monument

    by Airpunk Written Jan 3, 2010
    The Sikorski Monument
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    General Wladyslaw Sikorski was the leader of the exiled Polish government during WWII and a symbol for Polish resistance at this time. On July 4th 1943, Sikorski returned from an inspection of Polish forces in the Middle East. It was necessary to make a technical stopover in Gibraltar before returning to London. At 23:07 local time, Sikorskis plane took off from Gibraltar Airport and crashed into the Mediterranean Sea shortly after take-off. After Sikorski’s death, the role of the Polish within the allied forces diminished as his successors lacked the authority Sikorski had. Rumours about an assesination attempt quikcly arose, but none has been confirmed. It seems that it was just a tragic aviation accidnet. A monument, made out of an old propeller blade, was placed near the Cemetery. Two commemorative plaques, one in Polish and one in English, can be found in the Great Siege tunnels.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Pillars of Hercules

    by Airpunk Written Jan 3, 2010
    The Pillars of Hercules

    In the ancient world, the rock of Gibraltar was believed to be one of the “Pillars of Hercules”, called “Mons Calpe”. The other one is said to be Monte Hacho, called “Mons Abile”. According to ancient mythology, they support the world. Together they are said to form a gate to the Mediterranean, which is depicted in several documents, including the Spanish coats of arms, throughout the centuries.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Gibraltar Museum

    by Airpunk Updated Jan 3, 2010

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    Gibraltar Museum

    To get an overview of Gibraltar’s history from the geological formation of the rock to the current dispute with Spain, Gibraltar Museum is the right place. A 15-minute-film will give you a short overview while you should plan around 45 minutes for the rest of the exhibition. The exhibition is not as large as those in other historical museums, but still worth a visit. The house stands on the remains of a 14th century moorish bathhouse which can are part of the exhibition. As of 2009, admission fee was 2 pounds.

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Cradle of History Monument

    by Airpunk Written Jan 1, 2010
    The Cradle of History - monument

    This monument was placed to remember all the different historical events connected to Gibraltar. It ranges from the discovery of the first Neanderthal skull ever discovered to the military strategic point it was in WWII. The monument is located next to the runway, directly at the gate to cross the runway. It is on the southwestern side, meaning on the right before the runway when coming from the city.

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  • sugarpuff's Profile Photo

    Gibraltar Museum

    by sugarpuff Written Jul 16, 2007

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    Experience and enjoy Gibraltar's fascinating 200 million year history, with an audio visual presentation and several galleries displaying original artefacts, old prints ad photographs. The Rock's rich and diverse natural history is also represented while, the lower part of the building houses what is arguably the best preserved Moorish Bath House in Europe, dating from the 14th Century

    1000hrs - 1800hrs Monday to Friday
    1000hrs - 1400hrs Saturday
    Closed on Sunday
    Admission: Adults 2 pounds, Children under 12yrs 1 pound

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  • bugalugs's Profile Photo

    Nelson

    by bugalugs Written Jan 3, 2006

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    Admiral Nelson statue
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    Admiral Nelson of the British Naval Fleet died at the Battle of Trafalgar on HMS Victory. His body was actually put in a barrel of brandy to conserve it. The Victory then sailed to Gibraltar and his body was brought ashore. He died on 21st October 1805 but didnt not arrive in Gibraltar until 28th October due to bad weather conditions. His remains were then taken to England and he was interred in St Pauls Cathedral in London on 9th January 1806.

    As it was 200 years since his death this statue of Nelson has been erected in Gibraltar and unveiled in Gibraltar on 28th October 2005.

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  • bugalugs's Profile Photo

    Gibraltar Museum

    by bugalugs Written Jul 17, 2005

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    Gibraltar Museum

    The Gibraltar Museum has displays of weapons, ceramics, old coins, and lots of archeological artefacts.
    Open Mon - fri 10am-6pm
    Saturday 10-2pm
    Closed Sundays
    Admission: Adults £2.00
    Children under 12 - £1.00
    Free for under 5's
    Also included is a 15 minute film show on the history of Gibraltar.

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    Evacuation of the Gibraltarians

    by bugalugs Written Jul 17, 2005

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    Evacuation of the Gibralarians

    During the war women and children were evacuated against their wishes but on the orders of the British Government. The men stayed behind to work inthe dockyards.
    Many were sent to London, hardly a safer place.
    The British Government had then not wanted to return these evacuees and it was due to the intervention of the Gibraltar Legislative Council and in particular Sir Joshua Hassan that these people were repatriated.
    This monument made in bronze was erected in their honour and depicts the women and children returning.

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    General Sikorski Monument

    by gale.blog.pl Updated Mar 6, 2005

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    This is the monument dedicated to General Sikorski, a very important historical person for all Poles. General Sikorski died in a plane accident during World War II - his plane fell down to the sea right after it started its route in Gibraltar. It's still a mystery to all of us how he died and who ordered the 'crash'...

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    The Pillars of Hercules

    by MikeAtSea Written Feb 8, 2005

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    The Pillars of Hercules

    The Pillars of Hercules can be found on the way up to the top of the Rock. It is a monument to the modern world and indicates the importance Gibraltar had or still has in regards to trading with all regions of the world.

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