Epidaurus Things to Do

  • The theater
    The theater
    by JLBG
  • foundations
    foundations
    by painterdave
  • healing area
    healing area
    by painterdave

Most Recent Things to Do in Epidaurus

  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    The Late 4BC Theater Has Perfect Acoustics

    by hquittner Written Sep 28, 2011

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    The Theater of Epidaurus was initially built in the 4C BC with 34 rows of seats. During the Roman period the number of row was increased by another 21 rows. It originally had a back wall as well as a proskenion. Nowadays there is a summer festival of ancient theater.

    The Theater of Epidaurus More of the Theater
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    The Old Ruins

    by painterdave Written Sep 28, 2011

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    My main page covered some of the site, but I wanted to show more as there is lots to see here.
    The whole site is within a fenced area, and you must pay a small fee to enter, with that, you can visit the theatre, and the ruins with the small museum.
    People in classical times would come here to be healed of illnesses. They would stay for a night and hoped to be cured. During a dream, they would be advised by a god as to what would be the best way to be cured.
    The whole area for healing had 160 rooms and a mineral spring which was also thought to heal.
    In part of the ruins you can see a lot of the foundations of this, and some pools for bathing.

    Museum statue of healing (snake) foundations healing area athletic area
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    The theatre...

    by Mikebond Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Epidávros theatre is among the best in the world for its acoustics, already known in the ancient times. It was built by Polykléitos the younger in the 4th century BC. It has 55 rows of terraces and can host up to 14,000 spectators.
    This theatre became very famous also thanks to the great soprano Maria Callas, who performed there. Today people can assist to the Epidávros Festival that occurs every year.
    The picture is the result of two stitched photos, to show you the entire theatre.

    Epid��vros theatre
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    The theater

    by JLBG Written Jun 5, 2008

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    The theater was built Polyclete the Young in the middle of the 4th century BC and is exceptionally well kept. It is famous both for the perfection of its proportions and for the quality of its acoustic. From the top row, you can hear even the faintest murmur uttered on the scene.

    During summer, it is used every night for ancient Greece’s theater shows. Even if you do not understand them, it is worth going to one of them, just for the sight and the sounds.

    The theater
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Ancient Theatre

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 23, 2008

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    The Theater at Epidaurus is the largest and most impressive of ancient Greek and is in excellent state of preservation. It was built in the 4th century B.C. by the architect Polyclitus the Younger and was unrivalled for its acoustics. The prosperity brought by the Asklepieion enabled Epidauros to construct civic monuments too: the huge theater that delighted everybody for its symmetry and beauty.
    The original 34 rows were extended in Roman times by another 21 rows (there are 55 rows now).

    As is usual for Greek theaters (and as opposed to Roman ones), the view on a lush landscape behind the skene is an integral part of the theater itself and is not to be obscured.
    Famously, tour guides have their groups scattered in the stands and show them how they can easily hear the sound of a match struck at center-stage.

    The theater is marveled for its exceptional acoustics, which permit almost perfect intelligibility of unamplified spoken word from the proscenium or skene to all 15,000 spectators, regardless of their seating.

    Today the theater is still in use. Every year, from June to August, classical tragedies and comedies are performed here and attract thousands of Greek and foreign visitors.

    You may watch my high resolution photos of the Epidaurus Ancient Theatre on Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 38' 5.87" N 23º 7' 40.88" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Photo 1, Photo 2, Photo 3.

    Epidaurus - Ancient Theatre Epidaurus - Ancient Theatre Epidaurus - Ancient Theatre Epidaurus - Ancient Theatre Epidaurus - Ancient Theatre
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    Sanctuary of Asclepios

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Mar 23, 2008

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    The cult of Asclepius became increasingly popular in ancient Greece. In fact the ancient Greeks did just that in order to pay tribute to their spiritual entities in the face of Asclepios, and to ask the gods for remedies for their physical ailments. It was a healing center as well as a cultural center in ancient times.

    Pilgrims flocked to asclepieion to be healed. They slept overnight and reported their dreams to a priest the following day. He prescribed a cure, often a visit to the baths or a gymnasium.
    There are also mineral springs in the vicinity which may have been used in healing.

    The sanctuary of Asclepios at Epidaurus is a spiritual place and without doubt worth a visit! Though remainings of the sanctuary don't look very impressive (a few kept since then) but the atmosphere of this place is magnificent.

    You may watch or listen the music out of my 4 min 03 sec VIDEO-Clip Epidaurus Museum, Sanctuary&Theatre out of my YouTube channel.

    Sanctuary of Asclepios reconstruction Sanctuary of Asclepios remainings Sanctuary of Asclepios remainings Sanctuary of Asclepios remainings
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    Ancient Stadium

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 22, 2008

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    The ancient Greeks approached health from a holistic point of view, and the Sanctuary included a theater, gymnasium, and stadium as well as traditional medical treatments.

    The ruins sanctuary of Asclepius is an extended archaeological site with many interesting buildings and a newly excavated stadium. The most interesting building is by far the Tholos that unfortunately must be experienced by some distance since archaeologists are working on restoring it.

    Epidaurus - Ancient Stadium
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    Archaeological Museum

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 22, 2008

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    The museum houses the most important finds of the ongoing excavations.
    The museum of Epidaurus was built in 1902-1909 by the excavator of the sanctuary, P. Kavvadias, in order to house the partial reconstructions of the most important monuments of the Asklepieion, as well as the most significant excavation finds.

    Full admission: € 6 (For both the museum and the archaeological site)
    Reduced admission: € 3 (students from countries outside the E.U., citizens of the E.U. aged over 65)
    Operation Hours:
    Monday:11.00-17.00
    Tuesday-Friday: 07.30-17.00
    Saturday-Sunday: 07.30-17.00
    January 6th, Shrove Monday, Holy Saturday, Easter Monday,
    Holy Spirit, 28th October:07.30-17.00

    Epidaurus - Archaeological Museum
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  • magor65's Profile Photo

    Asklepios

    by magor65 Written Jul 19, 2006

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    I think it's time to say something more about Asklepios whose sanctuary we visit in Epidaurus.
    According to mythology he was the son of Apollo and Koronis - a princess of Tesalia. Unfortunately, she was unfaithful to her her god-lover and met her sad destiny. Goddess Artemis shot her with arrows and then changed her body into a burning stake. Little Asklepios was brought up by Cheiron - a centaur famous for his wisdom and kindness. He taught Apollo's son the art of healing with plants. Soon Asklepios became so skilled that he was even able to raise the dead. This angered Hades who complained to Zeus. The father of gods replied: ' When someone breaks the laws of nature he has to be punished; nobody - neither god nor man - can change fate'. Then Zeus sent a thunderbolt which struck Asklepios dead.

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    Museum

    by magor65 Written Jul 19, 2006

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    On the way from the theatre to the sanctuary we pass a small building that houses a museum. Visitors can see here ancient medical instruments, inscriptions about the miraculous cures and votive sculptures ( many of which have been replaced by plaster casts, whereas originals are in the Archeological Museum in Athens). In the picture you can see a reconstructed part of the Propylaia leading to the sanctuary of Asklepios.

    Fragment of Propylaia
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    Theatre (2)

    by magor65 Written Jul 18, 2006

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    The three main components of a Greek theatre were the theatron, orchestra and skene. The theatron was the curved seating area for audience. The orchestra was the performance area for the chorus and actors. In its centre there usually was a stone altar to Dionysus. The skene was a stage building, whose wall served as a kind of background for actors.
    The theatre of Epidaurus, although representative of its times, had no equal. It could seat 14 thousand people. It had a circular orchestra, which was something rare in those times. The theatron consisiting of 55 rows was horizontally divided into two sections. The seats closest to the orchestra had back supports. Of course, the theatre in Epidaurus, as all other Greek theatres, was not enclosed by any walls. This fact made it possible to incorporate nature into the plot.

    theatre
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    Theatre

    by magor65 Written Jul 18, 2006

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    The theatre in Epidaurus is an excellent example of perfect harmony between nature and architecture. It blends into lush green hills around and constitutes the whole with them. The trees at the top offer welcome shade, so it's no wonder that tourists, though exhausted, climb up to the 55th row of seats where they can find some rest from the merciless sun. What's more, from here they can fully appreciate the widely-known acoustics of the place. Whenever you come here you are bound to witness at least a modest presentation of the wonderful qualities of the theatre. Our guide proved them doing some experiments including dropping a coin - and, YES, we could hear the clinking sound very clearly. She then left us to ponder for a while on the wisdom and ingenuity of Greek architects who created such a wonder. How inferior (at least sometimes) is a modern man who must use all those new technological devices to make himself heard and what a horrible noise these new inventions often produce. A moment of reflection was soon broken by a group of American youths who checked the acoustics of the theatre singing (or rather attempting to sing) some modern hits. It was time to leave ...

    theatre
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  • magor65's Profile Photo

    The sanctuary of Asklepios

    by magor65 Written Jul 18, 2006

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    Although it is the theatre which nowadays attracts the visitors to Epidaurus, we must remember that in the first place it was the sanctuary of Asklepios. People suffering from various ailments came here to seek help and advice. It used to be the best known healing centre of ancient world.
    Today we can see here ruins of hotels, houses for priest-doctors, hospital, the foundations of the temple of Asklepios and of the building called Abaton. It was here that patients spent a night waiting for a visit of the god-healer who came to them in the shape of snake. Another interesting building in the sanctuary was Tolos - much bigger than the one in Delphi. According to Pausanias the inner foundations of Tolos created the maze used for keeping snakes. There is a theory that the mentally ill were let into the maze and their encounter with snakes was a kind of primitive shock therapy. It's hard to say now if it worked.
    I am truly impressed when I realize how ancient Greeks perceived man as a whole, treating the body, intellect and spirit with equal care. It is also visible here in Epidaurus. First pilgrims purified their body and soul from an illness, then they spent time doing physical exercise and the process of healing was completed by intellectual treatment. That is why next to the temple of Askelepios there was a stadium and theatre.
    It's a pity that lots of visitors coming to Epidaurus today limit their sightseeing to the theatre, omitting the archeological site with the sanctuary. It's true that the area is quite big, but definitely worth walking around. And the balsam air smelling of herbs and pine makes you think that the spirit of Asklepios is still present here.

    the sanctuary of Asklepios
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    Ancient Artifacts Portraits of Healing

    by janetanne Updated Feb 11, 2006

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    "I never knew the meaning of peace until I arrived at Epidavros," wrote Henry Miller. A sanctuary to Asclepios, the god of healing, was established in the 6th century BC and reached international prestige by the 4th century BC. Historians believe that Asclepios was a king blessed with a talent for healing that eventually became deified for his abilities. The infirm from all parts of Greece were drawn to the sanctuary at Epidavros to be treated by those trained in the healing arts. Physicians (Asclepiadea) treated patients in an organized manner and museum records reflect the "70 miracles of Asclepios" and recipes for natural medicine and various treatments.

    The prestige and reputation acquired by Asclepios as the major god of healing led to great economic prosperity for the sanctuary which made it possible to build large monuments to aid in the healing. Temples, porticoed buildings, and mineral baths were erected to treat the infirm guests. A library and gymnasium were also on site and games were held at the sanctuary, almost on a level with the greatest international festivals. Worshippers would come to Epidavros for a miracle cure, but stay for a longer period to rest, reflect, take mineral baths, and diet, departing much healthier.

    Today, you can still go to Epidavros to 'heal your city-smogged soul.' The peaceful grounds still remain and the statues in the museum will remind you of what it must have been like in the days of Asclepios.

    Headless Horseman and Headless Horse! Dedicated to Artemis - Goddess of the Hunt Corinthian Column Close Up
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    Ancient Artifacts Portraits of Healing

    by janetanne Written Feb 11, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    "I never knew the meaning of peace until I arrived at Epidavros," wrote Henry Miller. A sanctuary to Asclepios, the god of healing, was established in the 6th century BC and reached international prestige by the 4th century BC. Historians believe that Asclepios was a king blessed with a talent for healing that eventually became deified for his abilities. The infirm from all parts of Greece were drawn to the sanctuary at Epidavros to be treated by those trained in the healing arts. Physicians (Asclepiadea) treated patients in an organized manner and museum records reflect the "70 miracles of Asclepios" and recipes for natural medicine and various treatments.

    The prestige and reputation acquired by Asclepios as the major god of healing led to great economic prosperity for the sanctuary which made it possible to build large monuments to aid in the healing. Temples, porticoed buildings, and mineral baths were erected to treat the infirm guests. A library and gymnasium were also on site and games were held at the sanctuary, almost on a level with the greatest international festivals. Worshippers would come to Epidavros for a miracle cure, but stay for a longer period to rest, reflect, take mineral baths, and diet, departing much healthier.

    Today, you can still go to Epidavros to 'heal you city soul.' The peaceful grounds still remain and the statues in the museum will remind you of what it must have been like in the days of Asclepios.

    Headless Horseman and Headless Horse! Dedicated to Artemis - Goddess of the Hunt Corinthian Column Close Up
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