Unique Places in Athens

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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Athens

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    Monastery of Daphni UNESCO - World Heritage List

    by MITNIC Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    You can not Visit it this year becouse of renovated it.
    Monasteries of Daphni, Hossios Luckas, and Nea Moni of Chios Although geographically distant from each other, these three monasteries (the first is in Attica, near Athens, the second in Phocida near Delphi, and the third on an island in the Aegean Sea, near Asia Minor) belong to the same typological series and share the same aesthetic characteristics. The churches are built on a cross-in-square plan with a large dome supported by squinches defining an octagonal space. In the 11th and 12th centuries they were decorated with superb marble works as well as mosaics on a gold background, all characteristic of the 'second golden age of Byzantine art'.

    Daphne Separating the Athenian and Thriasian plains is Mt. Aigaleos, which the Sacred Way crosses by the same pass used by the main motor road. To the W of the watershed stands the famous Byzantine monastery. In the exonarthex can be seen a marble Ionic column and capital, probably of Hadrianic date, and in the cloister Doric capitals from Classical times. On the heights to the SW of the monastery, 10 minutes' walk away, is a cave in which Pan and the nymphs were worshiped from the 5th c. B.C. Almost 2 km W of the monastery, immediately N of the highway, is a Classical Sanctuary of Aphrodite, which Pausanias described as having before it a wall of rough stones worth seeing (1.37.7). Today the most prominent remain is a vertical scarp of rock pockmarked with niches for votive reliefs, part of a walled temenos that also included a shrine, stoa, and propylon. A priest's house lies to the N of the Sacred Way, at this point well preserved, while to the S is a rectangular foundation of unknown purpose, whose extremely heavy walls may fit Pausanias' description.C.W.J. Eliot, ed.This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976.

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    Museum of National Resistance

    by STRATOS79 Written Mar 16, 2011

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    The National Resistance from 1940 to 1944 is perhaps the most important event in the Modern Greek history and is dedicated to the Greek Resistance against the Axis occupation during World War II. The museum hosts all kind of material like typewriters uniforms photographs and all kinds of documents that existed at that time
    It is located in Leoforos Marinou Antipa & Sofokli Venizelou in the area of Ilioupoli
    Opened 10:00 – 14:00 (winter schedule)

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    Athens Postal and philatelic museum

    by STRATOS79 Written Mar 13, 2011

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    The museum shows the history of Greek post office through time with collections of rare stamps, seals paintings, mailboxes, horns, telephones.The building is located right next to the Kalimarmaro Stadium
    Open from 8:00 to 14:00 from Monday to Friday

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    the turn of the century

    by nikkot Updated Feb 16, 2011

    When you visit the history of Athens museum you can admire some old photos of Athens city, how it was at the beginning of the 20th century. Marvelious!. Hotel Grande Bretagne at Syntagma squaire, aiolou street, the acropolis, omonia squaire!

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    Thiseio flea market

    by penny_g Written Dec 9, 2010

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    This is definitely a must-do for the fans of oriental markets. You will see lots of gipsies, locals and other "exotic" people, offering a wide range of goods on this market. It is easily reachable by metro. The goods vary from souvenirs and ancient coins to lyngerie and wonderbras. Bear in mind that you can negotiate on the price and many articles start from 1 euro. Enjoy this flea market!

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    City Views Atop A MAssive Stone

    by AusPinay Updated Aug 9, 2010

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    A massive stone right across the enormous Acropolis where most people go saved us the trouble of joining in the crowds there!

    We climbed up a steep flight of steps, though there is also another way up to the top of this massive stone which looked like made of granite. It was a bit slippery but it helped us see uninterrupted views of the city of Athens, even as far as the other temples of popular interest. Due to the intense heat, we were not inclined to go high up to the Acropolis and also we're scared to go back late to the ship as we're sailing around 3 pm and we didn't expect the bus trip to take longer!

    But finding and climbing this rock was a delight and gave us the stunning views that we didn't need to go there ourselves!Just look at the photos!We saw lots of ruins and temples from that vantage point alone!

    we went up here on a massive rock reached the top saw city views and more! another one we saw atop the rock!
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    Day Trip to Vouliagmeni - A Green Suburb of Athens

    by Mozumbus Updated May 10, 2010

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    If you are in search of an escape from the ever-busy Athens and do not want to spend another day at a touristy attraction, then Vouliagmeni – a peninsular town some 25 km south of Athens – is something you should head for. A day trip is worth it especially when you could not plan for Greek islands and wish to at-least have a glimpse of what these islands are so famous for.

    Sporadic hills, pine trees, blue-flagged beaches, sandy sea-shores, clear sea, and a fresh water lake make this green suburb very different from the noisy conurbation. The spot is equally suitable for luxury as well as budget recreation; in addition to lavish private beaches and resorts, public beaches provide with the basis amenities free of cost, however, one ought to be there early to beat local youths who come early and in quite a number. There were hundreds of seats on the beach we visited and we found an unoccupied one only after searching for it.

    Weekend is preferable, when most of the tourist attractions remain close. However, keep in mind that Athenians – and not tourists – flock to their favourite beaches during weekends, but to many tourists this only adds to the ambiance and gives them a chance to savor the culture in a local setting. Because of its unique geographical setting the beach is good for swimming even in days when the sea gets rough.

    The word Vouliagmeni means “Sunken” and the town is named so may be because of its low altitude and isolated nature. For those who want more, the town offers sea sports and activities, Nautical Clubs, and even a docking Marine at Lemos area with modern facilities for boating.

    Getting to Vouliagmeni is easy; just take the fast E22 Saronida Express bus from Syntagma Square for about 45 minutes of easy ride. I understand from a forum posting that E22 is now included in Athens Transportation card, which was not the case when we visited, and we instead took the slow tram plus a bus ride to reach to the beach. Kindly email me should you have any further information in this regard so that I can update the tip.

    Here I would also like to acknowledge a fellow VTer Janet Hellis whose Vouliagmeni Tip compelled me to include the beach in our European backpacking trip itinerary, which we did not regret.

    Me at Vouliagmeni Beach, Athens
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    Piraeus

    by jlanza29 Written Jan 20, 2010

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    On one of our nights we decided to go to Piraeus to walk around and see the port !!!! But once we got there we realized that there was nothing there to see, I expected a lively marina with shops and restaurants, but even near the main square there was nothing but travel agency selling tickets to the various islands...not worth the trip here !!!!!

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    Athens Airport

    by angiebabe Updated Sep 26, 2009

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    I dont know if theres always an exhibition on there but keep an eye out as if theres an as interesting one as when I arrived then its worth taking a few minutes to have a look - when I arrrived there was a World Press Photo exhibition with excellent photos including moving pics of soldiers in Afghanistan - under an Airport Art banner.

    And then I went off to find the rental office and go get sorted with my rental car - great to just take your gear and go get in a car and be free again! Easy access to the motorways and I was on my way to Corinth and the Corinth Canal in no time.

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    Best sunset/view ever!

    by profuselycool Updated Jun 7, 2009

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    I'm not sure how commercially known this is, but the Temple of Poseidon, located about 1.5hrs north of Athens, is definitely worth a half-day trip. My family and I just found a cab driver we really liked and asked him about it, and we got a great rate. We headed up around 6pm, took some photos, and watched as the sun set around the cliffs and rugged landscape.

    The temple has some of the best ruins in Greece, and it is positioned on a cliff that jetisons out into the Aegean forming a small peninsula, which offers spectacular views. I have been to Greece twice recently, and both times felt the need to make this day-trip. If you have any time while in the area I would certainly recommend it!

    sunset! The temple is in the background, over my shoulder!
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    Delos - Views and ruins just a half day-trip away!

    by profuselycool Updated Jun 7, 2009

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    Ok so while Athens has ridiculous amounts of historic sights and scenes, there is a very worthwhile half day-trip to take. Head down to the main docks where you'd catch a ferry to any of the islands, and there will be several different times a day in which a ferry will be offering fares to Delos, which is a small island visible off the coast of Athens. I think the ride took 30-45 minutes if memory serves correctly.

    Anyways, you (and about 100 other ppl on the ferry?) will be privvy to some of the most complete and preserved ruins in Greece! Delos was an old merchant island that went uninhabited, and there's tons of cool stuff to check out here. Foundations from housing plots are still erect, you can make out the squares and gardens that graced the wealthier homesteads, and there is a fantastic hike up a sizeable hill in the center of the island. This was certainly a hightlight- do the hike! It's way less than an hour from the docks to the top of the hill, and the view of the whole Aegean and distant Athens landscape is SO WORTH IT. If theres only a few things you do while in Athens, go to the parthenon, temple of poseidon, and DELOS!

    Sweeping views Ruins Cool sculptures
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    More ancient bits 2

    by leics Written Apr 24, 2009

    As in my other tip, the remains of ancient Athens are now being preserved as they are exposed by new building.

    In Platia Monastirakiou you can see ancient walls, drains and watercourses exposed underneath protective glass covers.

    Sadly, the guard rails around the covers are too high and too far away for small people like me to see clearly.

    But if you are bigger than I am do have a look as you wander through the square.

    Underneath the square.......... Platia Monastirikiou
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    More ancient bits 1

    by leics Written Apr 24, 2009

    Ancient Athens (both Greek and Roman)extended far further than the Acropolis area, of course, but there is little sign of this under the acres of concrete.

    However, when ancient remains are exposed by new building they are now being preserved.

    You can see the remains of the Achanian Gate at the end of pedestrianised Eolou (which leads to Platia Omonia), and some bits of drainage systems, tombs, houses and roads are
    visible under protective glass and in Platia Kotzia (off Eolou).

    There is little enough to see of the ancient city once one is away from the Acropolis area: it is good to see newly-exposed remains being protected and kept visible.

    Achanian Gate and city wall Tombs and houses and wells More tombs and walls
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    Roman baths

    by leics Updated Apr 20, 2009

    You will almost certainly visit the site of the enormous Temple of Olympian Zeus.

    Whilst you are there take the time to wander the edges of the site. You'll find the remains of a 1st century Roman baths complex, and various other buildings, all quite well-signed in English.

    Although not huge, there are some nice bits of mosaic and some good examples of how the heating system worked.

    Worth a look before you go elsewhere.

    Entrance to site on Vasilissis Olgas. Open daily, April - September 8.30am - 7.30pm, October - March 8.30am - 3pm. 2 euro or joint Acropolis ticket.

    Mosaic flooring Heating furnace Exposed heating system Seats for the bath-house
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    Fethiye Tzami

    by leics Written Apr 20, 2009

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    The ancient mosque of Fethiye Tzami dates from 1458 and stands in a corner of the Roman agora/forum site.

    The mosque was dedicated by Sultan Mehmet 11, who conquered Constantinople ('fethiye' means 'conquest')

    You can't go in, because it is used as an archaeological storage area, but you can look round the exterior.

    At the rear there are several tombstones, inscribed with Arabic memorials.

    Fethiye Tzami Ancient gravestones Mosque entrance Above the doorway
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Athens Off The Beaten Path

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