Acropolis - Erechtheion, Athens

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  • THE LADYS OF THE ERECHTHEION,THE CARYATIDS.
    THE LADYS OF THE ERECHTHEION,THE...
    by gwendar
  • ERECHTHEION VIEW 3
    ERECHTHEION VIEW 3
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    ERECHTHEION VIEW 4
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    THE ERECHTHEION IN ALL ITS ELEGANCE

    by gwendar Written Jan 13, 2014

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    ERECHTHEION VIEWS
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    THE ERECHTHEION PART OF THE ETERNAL CITADEL OF THE ACROPOLIS,THEY MUST BE HUNDEREDS OF REVIEWS THAT TELL THE TRAVELER THE HISTORY OF THIS WONDERFUL BUILDING,SO I WONT ADD TO IT, ALL I WILL SAY IS VISIT THIS GREAT PIECE OF ATHENS ,STOP LOOK AND ADMIRE IT FOR ITS BEAUTY,SPEND TIME AND LET YOUR THOUGHTS RUN WITH THE WIND AND ENJOY.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Erechtheion

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 23, 2008

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    Athens - Acropolis - Erechtheion
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    The Erechtheum is an ancient Greek temple on the north side of the Acropolis. The temple as seen today is considered to be built in the V-th century BC. It may have been built in honor of the legendary king Erechtheus. The main structure consists of up to four compartments, the largest being the east cella, with an Ionic portico on its east end.
    The internal layout has since been obscured by the temple's later use as a church and possibly as a Turkish harem.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Acropolis on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 58' 18.39" N 23º 43' 33.66" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Erechtheion.

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    The Erechtheoin

    by aukahkay Written Nov 5, 2007

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    The Erechtheoin
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    The Erechtheoin is the most sacred part of the Acropolis. It was built between 421 - 406 BC and dedicated to the old gods of Athens and also to Poseidon and Athena, the dieties who, according to traditions, had quarelled over which of them was to be the patron of Athens. In the south porch of the Erechtheoin stands the Caryatids, scuptures of the kore type whose purpose was to support the roof of the temple. The ones that you see now are plaster casts - the originals are in the Acropolis Museum and one in the British Museum in London.

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    The Erechtheum & The Porch of Maidens

    by BorneoGrrl Written Sep 4, 2007

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    Porch of the Caryatids
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    Just beside the Parthenon sits the Erechtheum, a temple dedicated either to the legendary Greek hero Erichthonius or King Erechtheus. This is another fine example of Greek architecture and the highlight of the building is the "Porch of the Caryatids", where six maidens statues stand as supporting columns facing the Parthenon.

    However, the caryatids you see in the Erechtheum are actually replicas of the originals. One of the statues was removed and is now housed in the British Museum, while you can see the remaining caryatids in the Acropolis Museum.

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    Erechthion

    by mikey_e Written Jul 4, 2007

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    The Erechthion

    You'll likely see the Erecthion after being blinded by the glory of the Parthenon, but that in no way detracts from the importance of this smaller building. While the Parthenon was used more as a treasury than a religious site, it was the Erechthion where religious services were held. It was built towards the end of the 5th century BCE and is the site where Poseidon supposedly struck the earth with his trident and Athena created the first olive tree. The Erechthion is in fact the smaller part of the structure; it is more likely that you will be photographing the Porch of the Caryatids with its magnificent statues.

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    ACROPOLIS - THE ERECHTHEION

    by LoriPori Written Jun 26, 2007

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    Built into the hillside to the left of the Parthenon, the elegant and delicate form of THE ERECHTHEION supposedly contained the tomb of Erechtheus, a statue of Athena and a temple for Poseidon. Construction of the Erechtheion began in 420 B.C. and concluded in 406 B.C.
    The Temple faces east and its entrance is lined with six long Ionic columns. The Temple is unusual in that it incorporates two Porches (prostaseis). One at the northwest corner which is supported by the tall Ionic columns and one at the southwest corner which is supported by six massive female statues, the famous Caryatids. The maidens are not the original statues. They are located in the Acropolis Museum encased in glass.
    I found the Erechtheion the most wonderful of the Acropolis buildings. I sure took enough pictures of it.

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    Athens - The Erechtheum

    by littlesam1 Updated Jun 11, 2007

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    Porch of Maidens

    The Erectheum is one of the more unusual buildings on the Acropolis. It is built into the hillside and has many unusual sides and angles in its design. At one time it supposedly housed the tomb of Erechtheus (a mytholigical hero), a statue of Athena Polias and a temple for Poseidon. According to mythology Athena challenged Poseidon for the honor of becoming the patron dividinity of Athens. Poseidon created a salt water spring, but Athena caused an olive tree to grow on the spot. The judges chose Athena's olive tree as the winner. Today there is an olive tree growing near the one side of the temple to represent this contest. I did not walk on this side of the building as I did not realize there was an olive tree there until I came home and read some references on the building.

    The Porch of Maidens on the one side are not the original statues. They are located in the Acropolis Museum. There are six caryatids or maidens holding up the support for the porch. Instead of saying te caryatids or maidens Mark nicknamed them 'the chicks" and that became our label for them the rest of our stay.

    The elaborate design of this temple is in direct contrast to the simple beauty of the Parthenon just above it. All in all a fascinating building.

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    The Erectheion

    by viddra Written Sep 22, 2005

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    the famous porch
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    This is yet another main attraction and the best preserved building here. It was built between 420 and 393 B.C. and was named after King Erectheus, who was later identified as Poseidon.

    It's famous for the porch of maidens, the Caryatids (named after the women from Greek village of Karye who were turned into slaves and condemned to carry beams when their village was destroyed because it supported the Persians). These are in fact copies. All the originals but 1 are in the Acropolis Museum. That 1 is in the British Museum.

    This is also the most sacred site of the Acropolis where Poseidon and Athena had their contest because both wanted to become the Patron of the city. Poseidon thrust his trident into the rock and a spring burst forth, while Athena touched the ground with a spear and an olive tree grew. In this way Athena became the Patron and the city was named after her. Poseidon was given a small village in Syros.

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  • Acropolis - Erechteion

    by janbeeu Updated Jul 17, 2005

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    The Erechteion

    The Erechteion is one of the most elegant buildings of the Acropolis and it dominates the north side of the rock. The temple was built from 421 till 414 and from 409 till 406 BC on the place where, according to legend, Athena and Poseidon matched on the name of the town. On the photo you will see the olive tree, Athena?s gift to the town where as Poseidon gave the town a spring.

    The unknown architect of the Erechteion used the uneven rock to build an original temple in different parts on different levels. The temple was dedicated to Athena Polias and to Poseidon but also to gods of the mythical past of Athens like Erechteus. The monument was named after him.

    The Erechteion has three column galleries, one on the east, one on the north and on the south side. The north gallery has a monumental door and the famous Caryatides are at the south gallery also know as the Maidens porch. These six women statues are columns and in spite of their function, they are very elegant. They hold one leg bent which breaks the monotonous vertical axis of the column. The rich, deep folds of the almost transparent chiton (robe) give a feeling of diversity and balance.

    The six Caryatides on the monument are copies. Five of the original are kept in the Acropolis museum. One was taken (read: stolen) along with the Elgin marbles and a lot of other Greek important historical art, by Lord Elgin and is kept in the British Museum in London. For many years Greece and its people have urged the British government to give these artefacts back as they are part of the rich Greek history and belong to the Greek people. Read more on the "The Elgin Marbles" pages.

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    The Erechteion

    by Pieter11 Written May 24, 2005

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    One of the Kariathides
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    About 90 metres to the east, coming from the Propylaea, the Erechteion is located. In ancient times, the palace of the emperor of Mycenian Athens was situated here. Later there was built a first Erechteion at this place, but that one was destroyed in 480 B.C. by the Persians.

    The new Erechteion, that is visible now, was built between 437 and 432, and between 409 and 406 B.C. There was a break in the construction because of the Peloponnesian War. This Erechteion the the second largest building on top of the Acropolis. Only the Parthenon is bigger. The building is named after its architect: Erechteus, who is told to be buried inside the temple.

    In the Erechteion three gods are honoured: Zeus, Poseidon and Hephaistos. There also was a wooden statue of goddess Athena inside this temple. This statue first was located in the temple of Athene, but after the Erechteion was finished, it was moved here.

    The Erechteion is built in an Ionical style of construction. Because of the fact that there are so many gods that are honoured in this temple, there was a complex group of spaces inside. The northern hallway was used as temple for Poseidon. The eastern room was dedicated to Athena. The rest of the spaces are not known.

    The roof of the southern hallway is kept up by six famous womenstatues, the so called Kariathides. Because of pollution and rain the original statues have been damaged and therefore they have been removed and replaced by concrete copies.

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    Acropolis - Erechtheion

    by gale.blog.pl Updated Mar 14, 2005

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    Erechtheion

    Construction of Erechtheion started in year 421 BC and ended in 406 BC. Most probably the architect's name was Mnesicles.

    Erechtheion was sacrificed to Erechthereus, subduer of Eleusis and bringer of civilization to Attica, later identified with Poseidon.

    The place is famous for its Caryatid Porch. Unfortunately the maidens we can see today are only copies :(

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  • Acropolis - Erechtheion Caryatids

    by grkboiler Written Dec 11, 2004

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    Caryatids

    The Caryatids, one of the most popular scenes on the Acropolis, made up the southern porch of the Erechtheion. They were columns carved in the shape of women, and models from the village of Karyai in Laconia were used. The models you see on the temple are actually plaster copies - the originals are in the Acropolis Museum to prevent further damage from the elements. Lord Elgin took one back to London with him in 1803, and it is on display in the British Museum.

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  • Acropolis - Erechtheion Construction

    by grkboiler Written Dec 11, 2004

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    Erechtheion's Southern Porch

    The Erechtheion is a very interesting building that was built on 3 levels to accomodate for the unevenness of the ground. The main temple is divided in 2 parts - 1 dedicated to Athena and the other dedicated to Poseidon. The northern porch had 6 columns and has fissures supposedly left by Poseidon's trident striking the ground. It is also where Athena's sacred olive tree grew. The southern porch is the porch of the Caryatids, explained in my next tip.

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  • Acropolis - Erechtheion

    by grkboiler Written Dec 11, 2004

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    Erechtheion

    The Erechtheion, named after the mythical Athenian king Erechthonios, was the most important building on the Acropolis. It was a temple dedicated to Athena and Poseidon and was built on the supposed site of the battle for the naming rights to Athens between Athena and Poseidon. The olive tree that grows there today is said to have been on the spot where Athena planted her olive tree.

    The temple was commissioned by Pericles but work did not begin until 421 BC, 8 years after his death. It was completed in 406 BC. It was built in the Ionic style.

    The Erechtheion was used for many purposes over the years, including a harem for the wives of the Turkish commander in 1463. During the revolution, it was almost completely destroyed by a Turkish shell in 1827.

    See my other tips for more details.

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    Erecthion

    by maple_air Updated Nov 18, 2004

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    Erecthion/ Carytids

    This was Acropolis's holiest shrine, where in symbolic reconciliation, Athena and the city's old patron Poseidon- Erectheus were both worshipped.

    Among the structures left here in Acropolis, this is my favorite. I just think its amazing how it is to design the pillars of this part of the temple into these maidens.

    The south side of this temple, is the Porch of the Carytids, wherein the Ionic line was transformed into six maidens ( Carytids ) holding the entablature on their heads. What can be seen today are only replicas, four of the original ones are in the Acropolis Museum, one is in storage and one is in the British Museum.

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