Acropolis - Erechtheion-Caryatids, Athens

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  • porch of the Caryatids
    porch of the Caryatids
    by mindcrime
  • porch of the Caryatids
    porch of the Caryatids
    by mindcrime
  • ERECHTHEION VIEW 4
    ERECHTHEION VIEW 4
    by gwendar
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    Erechtheium temple

    by mindcrime Updated May 10, 2014

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    I always liked Erectheion more than the Parthenon that stands just on the right of it!
    It was built in between 421 and 406 B.C. entirely of Pentelic marble, in the ionic order, probably by architect Mnisiclis that was also responsible for the Propylaia.

    It was named after King Erichtonius (the early ruler of Athens) although some sources focus on Erectheus which came later but some texts confused them into one (eg Euripides in his tragedy Erechteus). The main temple was divided into two big sections, each of them dedicated to the worship of the two principal gods of Attica, Athena and Poseidon-Erechtheus. Here was where a lot of ancient ceremonies were taking place and within the foundations lived the sacred snake of the temple, which represented the spirit of Cecrops (a mythical king) and whose well-being was thought essential for the safety of the city.

    The whole building looks elegant but unusual at the same time and managed to survive through many difficulties including bambard by the ottomans during the Greek War of Independence in early 19th century.

    What I always liked (and still do) is the famous porch of the Caryatids, the famous Maidens on the south side of Erectheion. Those six massive female statues are sculpted each one in a manner different from the rest and they seem to carry the weight of the roof over their heads! They are replicas of the original statues but don’t worry!... you can see the original ones at the New Acropolis museum (one of them is in London thanks to Lord Elgin…that tried to take a second one but failed causing the destruction of the statue when he tried to have it sawn to pieces!!!…I wonder if he could take everything from the rock of Acropolis)

    Erechtheion temple at Acropolis hill Erechtheion temple porch of the Caryatids porch of the Caryatids
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    THE ERECHTHEION IN ALL ITS ELEGANCE

    by gwendar Written Jan 13, 2014

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    THE ERECHTHEION PART OF THE ETERNAL CITADEL OF THE ACROPOLIS,THEY MUST BE HUNDEREDS OF REVIEWS THAT TELL THE TRAVELER THE HISTORY OF THIS WONDERFUL BUILDING,SO I WONT ADD TO IT, ALL I WILL SAY IS VISIT THIS GREAT PIECE OF ATHENS ,STOP LOOK AND ADMIRE IT FOR ITS BEAUTY,SPEND TIME AND LET YOUR THOUGHTS RUN WITH THE WIND AND ENJOY.

    ERECHTHEION VIEWS ERECHTHEION VIEWS 2 ERECHTHEION VIEW 3 ERECHTHEION VIEW 4 THE LADYS OF THE ERECHTHEION,THE CARYATIDS.
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    Elegance and style

    by solopes Written Dec 16, 2013

    All isolated statues were removed to the museum, but fortunately, these ones, holding the structure couldn't be removed. They composse the most elegante and harmonious detail in the rich emsemble of Pártenon.

    Now the truth: Yes, they were also removed, five of them to the museum, and one to England, but the copies are perfectly "umperfect" respecting the aging expected in a piece of art coming from the 6th century BC.

    Erechtheion - Athens
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    Temple of Erechtheum

    by call_me_rhia Updated Jan 13, 2012

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    The Temple of Erechtheum, built between 421 and 406 BC and possibly dedicated to the Greek hero, is not just another temple on the Acropolis; it is, in my opinion, the most beautiful of them all. The reason is simple: the amazing Porch of Maidens – also known as the Porch of the Caryatids.

    Placed on the south side of the temple, the porch uses six draped female figures (the caryatids, indeed) as supporting columns. Each one, by the way, is a unique figure.

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    Marvel at the Lady Caryatids (replicas)

    by jumpingnorman Written Jan 22, 2009

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    I was driving here in Arizona and passed by a little stoneyard and saw a replica of those nice maidens I saw in the Parthenon --- wow, I wanted to buy them but then backed out when the owner wanted to sell it for US$12000 for the 4 statues. It would have looked great in my backyard, hehehe…

    But these structures are the Caryatids, the maiden columns of the Erechteion. Karyatides literally means "maidens of Karyae" (an ancient town).
    Somebody was telling me that women were locked inside in ancient times as a harem for the city officials --- not sure if this is true?

    But the structures that are now at the Parthenon are not the original ones. There were six original figures and one was removed by Lord Elgin in the early 1800s and brought to the British Museum in London. The other five figures were damaged by erosion and are stored in the Acropolis Museum.

    Caryatid Maidens in the Acropolis, Greece
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    Erechtheum and The Porch of the Caryatids

    by eksvist Written Jul 25, 2008

    The Erechtheum is an ancient Greek temple on the north side of the Acropolis, notable for a design that is both elegant and unusual.
    The temple was built between 421 and 407 BCE. The name derived from a shrine dedicated to the legendary Greek hero Erichthonius.

    On the north side, there is another large porch with columns, and on the south, the famous "Porch of the Maidens", with six draped female figures (caryatids) as supporting columns.

    I think this temple more known for these maidens-caryatids ... at least I didn't know nothing about Erechtheum before my trip to Athens but the photos about the Porch of the Caryatids I was seen a lot.

    Opening times and price look from my Acropolis tip.
    I think these maidens are worth to see them.

    the Porch of the Caryatids Erechtheum the Porch of the Caryatids Erechtheum

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    Porch of the Caryatids

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 23, 2008

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    On the north side, there is another large porch with columns, and on the south, the famous "Porch of the Maidens", with six draped female figures (caryatids) as supporting columns, each sculpted in a manner different from the rest and engineered in such a way that their slenderest part, the neck, is capable of supporting the weight of the porch roof whilst remaining graceful and feminine.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Acropolis on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 58' 18.72" N 23º 43' 34.39" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Porch of the Caryatids .

    Acropolis - Porch of the Caryatids Acropolis - Porch of the Caryatids Acropolis - Porch of the Caryatids Acropolis - Porch of the Caryatids
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    Erechtheion

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 23, 2008

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    The Erechtheum is an ancient Greek temple on the north side of the Acropolis. The temple as seen today is considered to be built in the V-th century BC. It may have been built in honor of the legendary king Erechtheus. The main structure consists of up to four compartments, the largest being the east cella, with an Ionic portico on its east end.
    The internal layout has since been obscured by the temple's later use as a church and possibly as a Turkish harem.

    You may watch my high resolution photo of Acropolis on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 37º 58' 18.39" N 23º 43' 33.66" E or on my Google Earth Panoramio Erechtheion.

    Athens - Acropolis - Erechtheion Athens - Acropolis - Erechtheion Athens - Acropolis - Erechtheion Athens - Acropolis - Erechtheion Athens - Acropolis - Erechtheion
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    The Erechtheoin

    by aukahkay Written Nov 5, 2007

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    The Erechtheoin is the most sacred part of the Acropolis. It was built between 421 - 406 BC and dedicated to the old gods of Athens and also to Poseidon and Athena, the dieties who, according to traditions, had quarelled over which of them was to be the patron of Athens. In the south porch of the Erechtheoin stands the Caryatids, scuptures of the kore type whose purpose was to support the roof of the temple. The ones that you see now are plaster casts - the originals are in the Acropolis Museum and one in the British Museum in London.

    The Erechtheoin The Erechtheoin The Caryatids The Caryatids
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    The Erechtheum & The Porch of Maidens

    by BorneoGrrl Written Sep 4, 2007

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    Just beside the Parthenon sits the Erechtheum, a temple dedicated either to the legendary Greek hero Erichthonius or King Erechtheus. This is another fine example of Greek architecture and the highlight of the building is the "Porch of the Caryatids", where six maidens statues stand as supporting columns facing the Parthenon.

    However, the caryatids you see in the Erechtheum are actually replicas of the originals. One of the statues was removed and is now housed in the British Museum, while you can see the remaining caryatids in the Acropolis Museum.

    Porch of the Caryatids The Erechtheum
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    Porch of the Caryatids

    by mikey_e Written Jul 4, 2007

    The Porch of the Caryatids is a bit misleading. It is indeed quite beautiful and that is in part thanks to the models used for the statues - all of whom were women from Karyai (Karyes), hence the name Caryatids. The lie is in the origin of the statues on display. The ones you will see are in fact plaster casts. The real statues are either in the Acropolis Museum or the British Museum (stolen by Lord Elgin). Nevertheless, it is difficult to notice the well-intentioned forgery when your on the Acropolis Rock.

    Porch of the Caryatids

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    Erechthion

    by mikey_e Written Jul 4, 2007

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    You'll likely see the Erecthion after being blinded by the glory of the Parthenon, but that in no way detracts from the importance of this smaller building. While the Parthenon was used more as a treasury than a religious site, it was the Erechthion where religious services were held. It was built towards the end of the 5th century BCE and is the site where Poseidon supposedly struck the earth with his trident and Athena created the first olive tree. The Erechthion is in fact the smaller part of the structure; it is more likely that you will be photographing the Porch of the Caryatids with its magnificent statues.

    The Erechthion

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    ACROPOLIS - THE CARYATIDS

    by LoriPori Written Jun 26, 2007

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    The Caryatids have become the Erechtheion temple’s signature feature, as they stand and seem to casually support the weight of the porch’s roof on their heads. Their identification, or the purpose for such elaborate column treatment is lost through the centuries. All the Caryatids on site today are exact replicas, while the originals are protected by the corrosive air of modern Athens in the Acropolis museum, encased in glass. One of the six Caryatids can be seen in the London museum having been appropriated, some say stolen, by Lord Elgin along with the Parthenon marbles.
    I found the lovely maidens so wonderful and photogenic.

    The six lovely maidens - the Caryatids
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    ACROPOLIS - THE ERECHTHEION

    by LoriPori Written Jun 26, 2007

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    Built into the hillside to the left of the Parthenon, the elegant and delicate form of THE ERECHTHEION supposedly contained the tomb of Erechtheus, a statue of Athena and a temple for Poseidon. Construction of the Erechtheion began in 420 B.C. and concluded in 406 B.C.
    The Temple faces east and its entrance is lined with six long Ionic columns. The Temple is unusual in that it incorporates two Porches (prostaseis). One at the northwest corner which is supported by the tall Ionic columns and one at the southwest corner which is supported by six massive female statues, the famous Caryatids. The maidens are not the original statues. They are located in the Acropolis Museum encased in glass.
    I found the Erechtheion the most wonderful of the Acropolis buildings. I sure took enough pictures of it.

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    Athens - The Erechtheum

    by littlesam1 Updated Jun 11, 2007

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    The Erectheum is one of the more unusual buildings on the Acropolis. It is built into the hillside and has many unusual sides and angles in its design. At one time it supposedly housed the tomb of Erechtheus (a mytholigical hero), a statue of Athena Polias and a temple for Poseidon. According to mythology Athena challenged Poseidon for the honor of becoming the patron dividinity of Athens. Poseidon created a salt water spring, but Athena caused an olive tree to grow on the spot. The judges chose Athena's olive tree as the winner. Today there is an olive tree growing near the one side of the temple to represent this contest. I did not walk on this side of the building as I did not realize there was an olive tree there until I came home and read some references on the building.

    The Porch of Maidens on the one side are not the original statues. They are located in the Acropolis Museum. There are six caryatids or maidens holding up the support for the porch. Instead of saying te caryatids or maidens Mark nicknamed them 'the chicks" and that became our label for them the rest of our stay.

    The elaborate design of this temple is in direct contrast to the simple beauty of the Parthenon just above it. All in all a fascinating building.

    Porch of Maidens

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